The Colorado Department of Education

Offices | Staff Contacts | Colorado.gov

Educational Service Providers - Provider Detail

The information provided regarding Educational Service Providers is provided for information only. The Colorado Department of Education does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of any of the information, content, services or other materials provided by these educational service providers. Any reliance upon any information, content, materials, products, services or vendors included on or found through this listing shall be at the user's sole risk.

Provider

Success for All Foundation, Inc.

Contact Information

Primary

Scott Hesel
200 West Towsontown Boulevard
Baltimore, MD 21204

Phone: (410) 616-2427
Email: shesel@successforall.org

Secondary

Bonnie Darby
12306 N. Pathfinder Dr.
Marana, AZ 85658

Phone: (520) 591-0133
Email: bdarby@successforall.org

General Information

Website: www.successforall.org
Effectiveness Data: www.successforall.org/research/evidence.html
Type of Organization: Other
Non-profit
Organization is best described as: Non-Profit
Age of Firm / Number of Years in Operation: 25
Level(s) services may be provided: - Elementary
- Middle
- High School
Provides performance guarantees in contract: NO
Educational Services Provided Assessment
Comprehensive & Effective Planning
Content Curriculum Programs
Curriculum Alignment
District Culture
Instruction
Leadership
Professional Development
Student
Family and Community Support
School and District Improvement
Diagnostic Review

Name of Schools/ Districts that this organization has served in Colorado:

Success for All foundation currently serves 8 schools in Colorado, with the greatest concentration of schools in the Garfield and Pueblo districts.

Contact for Pueblo School district:

Name: Lisa Gagliardi

Position: Literacy Facilitator

School: Pueblo School for Arts and Sciences

Phone: (719) 568-8600

email: lisa.gagliardi@colostate-pueblo.edu

Recent References:

Roberta W. Freeman
District Administrator for
Assessment & Accountability
Long Branch Public Schools
540 Broadway
Long Branch NJ 07740
(732) 571-2868
rfreeman@longbranch.k12.nj.us

Sylvia Fajardo
Executive Director
Pacoima Charter Elementary School
sgf5847@lausd.net
11016 Norris Ave.
Pacoima, CA 91331
(818) 899-0201

Name of Schools/ Districts that this organization has served in other states:

Success for All has served 1,200 schools over the past 20 years in 45 states. Please refer to previous listed references in this RFI if you would like an evaluation.

Qualifications of this Organization (licensure, trademark, etc.):

The Success for All Foundation's current resources, including field consulting staff, support staff and facilities are more than adequate to implement the projected activities for Colorado turnaround/transformation services. Our total staff of 220 employees includes approximately 100 full time/part time field consulting staff. Two thirds of these field staff has more than 5 years experience with the Foundation. All have established records of strong and successful delivery service.

Qualifications of Instructors/ Staff that Provide Services:

The following is an overview of the qualifications of staff that would be assigned to school in Colorado:

Connie J. Fuller
2804 DeSoto Parkway Northeast
Fort Payne, Alabama 35967
256-630-2731
cfuller@successforall.org

Skills Summary
- Supervision
- Developing/Providing Professional Development
- Organized
- Coaching/Providing Feedback
- People skills
- Develop and maintain performance data for student achievement in 60 schools in seven states/trainers/coaches on team I supervise
- Data Analysis
- Interactive White Board
- Develop and conduct Webinars/WebEx
- Provided professional development training in Israel and the U.K. including appropriate early childhood training sessions
- Developed and presented Early Childhood Development sessions for teachers at National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
- Knowledge and understanding of educating young children and adults
- Evaluates employees

EDUCATION
Troy University, Montogmery, AL
Masters of Education

Auburn University, Montgomery, AL
Bachelor of Arts, Early Childhood and Elementary Education

Troy University, Montgomery, AL
Four semesters of Computer Science








EXPERIENCE
Area Manager of Southeast region for the Success For All Foundation, Inc. 1998-Present
Supervise and evaluate a team of trainers, oversee the management of 60 Success For All (SFA) schools in the areas of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Mississippi, Missouri and Arkansas
- Manage the regional budget, trainer timesheets, client data reports, trainer evaluations and expenses
- Schedule trainers and fulfill school contracts
- Provide professional development and present various SFA components, meet with district and school administrators, superintendents and school staff
- Provide support, training, professional development, coaching and guidance for team members, present Success For All components at conferences, district trainings, school trainings, and awareness's
- Train new employees when necessary
- Meet with district personnel, superintendents and educators
- Plan, develop and lead webinar meetings
- Train and use interactive white board technology
- Collect and analyze trainer evaluations

Instructional Facilitator/Trainer for the Success For All program at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
- Provided professional development for teachers and principals. Trained teachers in various Success For All (SFA) components, point trainer for assigned schools, met with district and school administration
- Planned district and school trainings, helped schools order materials and implement the Success For All (SFA) program as designed
- Mentored less experienced trainers, trained at conferences, provided professional development for clients and presented awareness's
- Trained educators Internationally -Provided professional development for educators in Israel and the United Kingdom, making appropriate modifications
- Provided professional development for educators and trained Early Learning and other SFA components in Alaska for 4 years

Teacher with the Montgomery County Board of Education
Experiences include working in inner-city schools; five years as a Success for All site facilitator/Title 1 Resource Coach.
- Taught grade levels pre-k through sixth
- Taught, developed and organized observation lessons, teacher in-services, community and parent workshops
- Tested and monitored student progress, worked with business partners, community leaders and parents to provide services to students, provided professional development as needed for staff

Name: Lori Martin
Address: 12983 N Westminster Drive
Tucson AZ 85755
Education: University Of Arizona, Bachelor of Arts in Education
Professional Experience
Where/when: Success For All Foundation 1999 - Current
Accomplishment: Helping schools increase student achievement. An example of this increased achievement can be seen at a school in Pacoima, Ca. The school is 100% Free and Reduced Lunch,
97% Hispanic/ Latino and 76% English Language Learners. After 10+ years of partner with Success For All Foundation this school was finally able to be removed from Program Improvement status during the 2010/2011 school year.

Where/when: Amphi Unified School District, Nash Elementary/ 1997-1999
Accomplishment: Helped developed and implement successful Dual Language Program. As a result of implementing the Dual Language Program enrolled second language learners were able to outperform peers that were not part of the program in 4th grade.
Where/when: Nogales Unified School District, Lincoln Elementary 1995- 1997
Accomplishment: Involved in the development of Nogales Unified district standards for Kindergarten Math. Complimentary activities were also created to help ensure student performance met or exceeded the district standards.
Teresa Blanton
1446 Wilshire Way
McDonough, GA 30253
404 915-8318
tblanton@successforall.org

Education:
M. A. Curriculum and Assessment, Walden University, 2009

M. A. Early Childhood Education, University of Georgia, 1983

B. S. Early Childhood Education, University of Georgia, 1978

Experience:
Early Childhood School Consultant, 1999 - Present
Success for All Foundation
Duties: Curriculum Trainer, Curriculum Developer, Mentor, Coach

Classroom Teacher, 1987 - 1999
Winston Elementary in Lakeland, FL
Classes: Kindergarten, 1st grade

Lead Teacher, 1985 - 1987
Sheltering Arms Day Care, Duluth, GA
Duties: Curriculum and Preschool teacher of 4 year olds

Assistant Director, 1983-1985
Young Children, Birmingham, AL
Duties: Supervise teachers, Kindergarten teacher

Classroom Teacher, 1978 - 1983
Danielsville Elementary in Danielsville, GA
Class: 3rd grade

Presentations:

Blanton, Teresa (2009) Playing with Words. Presented workshop at the NAEYC conference in Washington, DC.

Blanton, Teresa (2010) Quality questioning for young minds at risk. Presented workshop at the NAEYC conference in Anaheim, CA.

Blanton, Teresa (2011) Strengthening students' thinking through play. Will be presented at NAEYC conference in Orlando, FL

Professional Affiliations

National Association of the Education of Young Children, NAEYC
International Reading Organization, IRA
Georgia Association of Young Children
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, ASCD

Cost:

The costs of services depends on the number of students, classrooms needs, and technology available in the particular school. Interested parties should contact us directly for specific pricing info.

Explanation of how we are able to provide differentiated services to meet the individual needs of schools and districts.

SFAF will provide differentiated services by conducted an initial needs assessment. SFAF consultants will conduct a thorough review that will assess all aspects of the educational environment for each individual school within the district. This review will result in a summary of school instructional strengths and areas of concern. Specific areas to be reviewed will include the following: student achievement data; student demographic data; class size; curriculums and instructional programs used for reading, math, and writing and if they are research-proven; tutoring programs used and number of students tutored; existence and use of student management protocols; collection and use of formative data, and school structures to support student achievement.

This review will be conducted during the April-August timeline through the use of document reviews, interviews with administrators, classroom walk-throughs, and outcomes and process data reviews. The information collected will be analyzed to provide a review of some of the major factors impacting instruction and student achievement across the school for the purpose of identifying next steps in the effort to improve student achievement .

A brief interview will be conducted with each school principal to gather information on number of classroom teachers; primary reading, math, and writing programs used; number of students involved in tutoring and programs used; confirmation of class size as reported by the central office; student management protocols; and involvement of staff in use of data and continuous improvement planning. Principals will be asked to provide artifacts to document class sizes, involvement of staff in use of data, and written protocols for student management. Artifacts provided by principals will include class rosters, staff data meeting agendas and minutes, staff handbooks/memos and student handbooks/letters.

Classroom walk-throughs will be conducted with a focus on collecting trend data across the school. The focus of the walk-throughs will be to collect information on what teachers are doing while students are in the classroom, and to record the level of student engagement in the learning task, and the level of rigor in the questions and tasks presented to students. In addition, these walk-throughs will provide observations on the orderliness of classrooms, school hallways and lunchrooms, the conditions of facilities, and the resources available in classrooms and libraries. In addition, the SFAF consultant will meet with the top education officials in the district. During this meeting the purpose of the review will be discussed, as well as gathering of information from the central office on what data, documents, and district actions have been taken previously on behalf of the school. The assessment will include major findings from across the school, both strengths and areas of concern. The report will include a summary of findings based on a compilation of information collected and reviewed.

The written servicesplan would include details for:
- structuring the school leadership team
- school support and reporting structures with the district
- school accountability measures including identification of formative assessments
- student organizational model
- student support and intervention services
- professional staffing requirements
- curriculum and additional resources if needed
- instructional model
- comprehensive professional development plan
- school calendar and daily schedule
- technology supports needed
- student management procedures
- parent involvement plan
- community partnership plan

How will we evaluate our services and support to schools and districts and its effectiveness in school/ district/ student achievement?

SFAF will conduct the following tasks to evaluate program effectiveness:

Task 1. Identification/Diagnosis/Evaluation/Monitoring of School Progress

During Leading for Solutions Sessions and assessment visits, SFAF's leadership consultant will work with each school's leadership team to develop an achievement plan establishing specific targets for student achievement. This achievement plan will be a necessary first step in implementing the turnaround program, because it will enable the school's leadership and staff to visualize how the implementation of Success for All will lead to the outlined achievement targets and will allow the SFAF consultants to target each school's specific reform needs. The achievement plan will also serve as a guide to educators as they continually evaluate the school's progress toward achievement targets and adjust instruction as necessary to ensure success in reaching those targets by the end of the year. The development of each school's achievement plan will be realized through the tasks described below.

Task 2. Train and support school leadership and staff in the implementation of the baseline benchmark assessment and the use of Member Center.

Before each school administers its initial benchmark baseline assessment, the SFAF leadership and instructional consultants will train faculty in administration of the assessment, entering and analysis of data into SFAF's Member Center, and regrouping processes.

SFAF's Member Center is an online tool where schools will enter their quarterly benchmarks and other site-specific data to assist in their monitoring of progress toward attainment of school and subgroup goals and proficiency in specific sub-skills by class and by student. The data provided by the Member Center will allow school leaders to better monitor the progress of specific classes and students so they can target interventions.

Task 3. Analyze school data to develop an achievement plan with measurable targets.

Through the data-analysis process of Leading for Solutions, the SFAF leadership consultant will assist each school in developing a concrete plan for reaching established achievement targets aligned to their Restructuring Plan. This data-analysis process is supported by the following actions:
- The SFAF leadership consultant will assist school staff in fully understanding the assessment and accountability standards governing the Illinois public schools and help them understand their level of success in terms of the Colorado accountability system.
- The SFAF leadership consultant will assist each school with the implementation of the benchmark assessments and/or existing benchmarks and will use summative and formative assessment data as well as regular progress monitoring (through classroom walk-throughs and examination of student work products) to engage schools in identifying student strengths and areas of concern.
- Once areas of concern have been identified, the SFAF leadership consultant will help the school staff to set goals that meet or exceed the required proficiency level for all subgroups in order to meet AYP and that address the identified areas of concern. These goals will be student-centered, measurable, appropriate, and specific, focusing on both school-wide issues and specific subgroups, such as special education and ELL.

Task 4. Conduct quarterly assessment visits to assist school leadership and staff in the management and effective use of assessment data.

The SFAF leadership and instructional consultants will visit quarterly, after the school has administered the benchmark assessment for that quarter to help school leaders, including the Success for All facilitator, review the assessment data, regroup students, and monitor quarterly targets. These two-day visits will also provide the SFAF instructional consultant with the opportunity to use new data to inform classroom walk-throughs and to help the facilitator provide feedback to teachers and manage professional learning community meetings. These walk-throughs will combine in-person analysis to go along with the assessment data, and will allow SFAF officials to provide accurate feedback to district officials on teacher performance.

Sample of services offered for a school or district:

Under 500 Students:

The following is an overview of the services we provide schools and districts, regardless of size (which will be adjusted to scale in larger schools).

Element I: Organizational Management and Leadership
The Success for All Foundation, Inc. (SFAF) believes that all children can learn, regardless of their socioeconomic background, and that every school must work relentlessly to ensure students' educational success. With these beliefs at the core of the Success for All Foundation, our reform model is based upon the integration of best practices for instruction, leadership support, data monitoring, professional development, and interventions for individual students.
SFAF research-proven school reform revolves around the concept of cooperative learning. Cooperative learning will group students in four- to five-member teams to help each other master academic content. Dr. Robert Slavin, the co-founder and chairman of SFAF, has completed extensive research on the effects of cooperative learning and has identified the following positive characteristics as common to students who learn in cooperative settings:
- Higher achievement
- Increased retention of information
- More positive heterogeneous relationships
- Greater intrinsic motivation
- Higher self-esteem
- More on-task behavior
- Improved attitudes toward teachers and school

Because of the success of cooperative learning strategies on student motivation, engagement, and achievement, SFAF believes in the necessity of student interaction to facilitate learning and improve student achievement results, so the SFAF instructional consultant will assist district and school leadership in creating a school structure to support cooperative learning and train school staff in the Colorado schools served in using cooperative learning across the content areas as well as in reading. In addition, the use of cooperative learning strategies provides a highly effective instructional strategy for both special education and English language learners by giving them inclusive opportunities to participate in the same rigorous curriculum available to all students. Through SFAF's cooperative learning structures, students will work together to learn and will also be responsible for their teammates' learning using proven strategies to help each other master academic content. This training in and implementation of cooperative learning will directly support school staff in improving instructional practices and, therefore, student achievement in all content areas and will provide consistency of instruction for students.
The SFAF programs are school reform turnaround models based upon the integration of best practices for instruction, leadership support, data monitoring, professional development, and interventions for individual students that have been used in over 1,200 schools over the past 20 years, improving the achievement of more than two million children. Over 52 studies of the effectiveness of Success for All as a reform model in increasing student achievement have been conducted by over 30 researchers. Through these independent reviews of the research on and effects of Success for All, researchers have consistently found that implementation of Success for All has resulted in significant increases in student achievement in a variety of settings. Most recently, the Comprehensive School Reform Quality Center at the American Institutes for Research reviewed the research on 22 comprehensive school reform models and placed Success for All and only one other program in the highest category it awarded. The review cited 31 studies as conclusively showing evidence of the positive impact of Success for All. In addition, The Consortium for Policy Research in Education did a comparison study of Success for All, America's Choice, and the Accelerated Schools Project in its August 2009 "School Improvement by Design" report. The study showed that SFAF student scored 10 percent higher in reading proficiency than AC, ASC and all other comparison schools.

The Success for All Foundation employs a leadership staff with a wealth of experience in every capacity of education: teaching, school leadership, district leadership, and reform-based consulting and research. We have assembled consultants and employees with even more extensive experience in all these areas to serve as whole-school reform consultants and managers. They include former superintendents and assistant superintendents with records of turning around failing schools. The Success for All Foundation has provided support to over 1,000 schools with comprehensive turnaround. The Success for All Foundation's current resources, including field consulting staff, support staff and facilities are more than adequate to implement the projected activities in this proposal. Our total staff of 220 employees includes approximately 100 full time/part time field consulting staff. Two thirds of these field staff has more than 5 years experience with the Foundation. All have established records of strong and successful delivery service.

Initially, SFAF will assist the district in identifying a school leadership with the vision and capability to facilitate the needed changes. A needs analysis would be conducted in collaboration with school and district staff to build a common vision and sense of urgency. This needs analysis would culminate in a school improvement plan with clear goals, targets, and success measures. Data reviews of these goals and targets would be held monthly and conducted collaboratively by the SFAF consultant and district and school leadership. SFAF will utilize Professional Learning Communities (PLC) to facilitate this process. They work collaboratively with distributed leadership to analyze student data, refine instruction to improve results, and hold themselves accountable for the outcomes. Much of the focus in a PLC is on what each student needs to learn, how it is known when a student has learned it, and how teachers will respond when a student is having difficulty learning. In a PLC, educators use the collaborative power of team accountability to focus on interventions rather than letting students get to a point that they need remediation. Schools using the SFA TurnAround model have teachers that participate in at least two PLCs on a regular basis: one that focuses on what students are learning in reading and one that focuses on what students are learning in math.

Element II: Academic Performance
Curriculum Overview

The cooperative-learning structures described in Element I of this proposal will be supported an interactive instructional model known as the Cycle of Effective Instruction. This Cycle of Effective Instruction assists teachers in all content areas in effectively promoting student motivation for learning. This framework, described in the outline below, is used successfully across the curriculum to teach learning behaviors, cooperative learning standards, academic content, processes, strategies, and skills. The SFAF instructional consultant will train school staff in the implementation of this structure to improve and support student motivation, as well as create continuity for students.

Active Instruction: During Active Instruction the teacher explains new skills, concepts, or strategies by providing purposeful and deliberate modeling. Active Instruction is also a time for students to engage in guided practice before using concepts on their own.

Partner/Team Practice: The Partner/Team Practice portion of the lesson allows for the successful use of cooperative learning strategies described earlier and provides students with the opportunity to process new information through engagement with their peers. During Partner/Team Practice, the teacher continues to assist students through monitoring, intervening, prompting, and reinforcing positive learning behaviors.

Assessment: In every Success for All curriculum, both formal and informal assessments occur on an ongoing basis. This continual assessment allows teachers to determine if they need to return to earlier segments of the Cycle of Effective Instruction for more instruction or team practice.

Celebration: When mastery is determined using ongoing assessments, individual achievements are recognized and team contributions are celebrated.

Assessment Procedures

Student progress will be monitored on a weekly basis using classroom measures and on a quarterly basis using reading and math level assessment and three times per year benchmarks aligned with the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) and that provide a prediction of student performance on these assessments. Classroom measures include end of unit assessments that provide information on student master of standards and skills taught that week. End of quarter assessments for reading include either SRI or Gates-MacGinitie (district choice) that will provide information on student reading mastery levels and allow for the monitoring of student reading gains. End of quarter assessments for math include either GMADE or the SFAF math benchmark that will provide information on student math mastery levels and allow for the monitoring of student math gains. In addition, three times a year students will take a predictive benchmark that provides predictive information on student scores on the CSAP as well as information on which standards students need additional support before taking the state assessment. The benchmark currently used by the school's district will be used if such a benchmark is in place in the district or the district will secure the Colorado version of Acuity (McGraw-Hill) to be used for this purpose. The building schedule will be constructed in such a way that teachers meet in teams or PLCs for data analysis and planning on a weekly basis. These PLCs will be primarily responsible for analyzing and responding to this weekly and quarterly data.

Element III: Learning Environment
Through the Solutions Network, SFAF offers a School-wide Behavior Management Program that the SFAF Solutions consultant will help implement in each Colorado school it serves. Because the design of the School-wide Behavior Management Program will be based on the needs of each individual school, the SFAF Solutions consultant will help each school develop a plan through the following actions:
- Utilize multiple data collection points (discipline referrals, suspension/expulsion records, and surveys for administrators, teachers, parents, auxiliary staff, and students) to assess behavior "hot points" and determine interventions that have been successful.
- Use collected data to develop a comprehensive behavior management plan with behavior tracking mechanisms and timelines for testing and modifying the plan.
- At the beginning of the year, train the school staff in Proactive Behavior Management and support the implementation throughout the year.
- Implement Getting Along Together program.
- Provide behavior management support throughout the year, covering such topics as the ABC's of behavior, the cycle of off-task behavior, and managing the disruptive student.
- Review data at the end of the year and modify the behavior management plan in preparation for the next year.

At the beginning of the year, the SFAF instructional consultant will train the entire school staff in SFAF's Getting Along Together program, a K-8 social problem-solving curriculum designed to teach children to think critically, solve problems nonviolently, and work in teams effectively and cooperatively. By implementing the Getting Along Together program, SFAF will help each Colorado school establish school-wide processes for preventing and resolving conflicts among students, as well as between students and teachers both in and outside of the classroom. Benefits of Getting Along Together include:
- Ten interactive, literature-based lessons that introduce skills and strategies.
- Teacher's guides that provide structures for coaching individual students to resolve specific conflicts, conducting class meetings, setting positive expectations, rewarding positive peer interaction, and addressing class-selected issues as a group throughout the school year.
- Refinement and reinforcement of learned skills throughout the rest of the school year with weekly class meetings, additional instruction and coaching, and Peace Path and Think-It-Through strategy sheets in all classroom and common spaces throughout the school.

Because all school staff members, including the principal, teachers, cafeteria staff, and office staff, are trained and involved in the Getting Along Together process, it will promote an effective, consistent structure that the solutions coordinator and Cooperative Culture management team of the Solutions Network will reinforce throughout the year.

Parental Involvement

To support the involvement of families in the academic lives of their children, the Solutions Network at each school will use a Parent and Family Involvement Team led by a parent liaison. The SFAF Solutions consultant will work with the school's leadership to identify a current staff member who understands the needs of families in the school community to act as the parent liaison. This parent liaison will serve as the leader and coordinator of the Parent and Family Involvement team, which will consider school goals in targeting family involvement to the needs of the particular school. The parent liaison will also work to recruit at least one parent representative to serve on the team and ensure that the needs of families are represented within the school community.

Community Involvement

To better involve the community in the workings of the school and to draw upon resources from within the community, the SFAF Solutions consultant will assist the solutions coordinator in creating a Community Involvement Team. Members of the Solutions Network in each school will choose to work with the Community Involvement Team, under the guidance of the solutions coordinator and the support of the SFAF Solutions consultant. The Community Involvement Team will forge relationships with business and community partners able to provide assistance to students in a wide variety of areas and will draw upon the knowledge of the entire school staff in identifying and developing additional partnerships that would be particularly beneficial in helping the school reach its achievement targets. Before the school year starts, the Community Involvement Team will conduct a Community Needs Survey to determine how the school can best serve the community and vice versa.

Social Services

The SFAF Community Connections Team will also work to establish service provider partnerships that will secure social, emotional, and physical health for low-income students. The following are types of service provider partnerships that SFAF will work to establish, depending on the culture and climate of each school:
- Physical and Mental Health Services: Schools that have a need for physical and mental health services can meet these needs in a variety of ways. In the past, SFAF has established clinics by stationing service health providers onsite on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Other options include identifying health clinics and making them aware that school children and their families are in need of service providers with whom they feel comfortable and can trust, such as clinics with bilingual staff members.
- Food Services: The Community Connections Team will utilize the school as a food distribution site by linking with local agencies. By establishing this partnership, hungry students will be fed, and parents who rarely have an opportunity to visit the school building can come to pick up food, which will give them a chance to chat with staff members of the school.
- Shelter: Community Connections component members will establish working relationships with emergency shelter providers to help support a child while a family is homeless or in a temporary living situation. Component members will also help to plan transportation and additional support for homeless students. These types of partnerships allow homeless students to continue their schooling while having their living needs met.

500-1000 Students:

The following is an overview of the services we provide schools and districts, regardless of size (which will be adjusted to scale in larger schools).

Element I: Organizational Management and Leadership
The Success for All Foundation, Inc. (SFAF) believes that all children can learn, regardless of their socioeconomic background, and that every school must work relentlessly to ensure students' educational success. With these beliefs at the core of the Success for All Foundation, our reform model is based upon the integration of best practices for instruction, leadership support, data monitoring, professional development, and interventions for individual students.
SFAF research-proven school reform revolves around the concept of cooperative learning. Cooperative learning will group students in four- to five-member teams to help each other master academic content. Dr. Robert Slavin, the co-founder and chairman of SFAF, has completed extensive research on the effects of cooperative learning and has identified the following positive characteristics as common to students who learn in cooperative settings:
- Higher achievement
- Increased retention of information
- More positive heterogeneous relationships
- Greater intrinsic motivation
- Higher self-esteem
- More on-task behavior
- Improved attitudes toward teachers and school

Because of the success of cooperative learning strategies on student motivation, engagement, and achievement, SFAF believes in the necessity of student interaction to facilitate learning and improve student achievement results, so the SFAF instructional consultant will assist district and school leadership in creating a school structure to support cooperative learning and train school staff in the Colorado schools served in using cooperative learning across the content areas as well as in reading. In addition, the use of cooperative learning strategies provides a highly effective instructional strategy for both special education and English language learners by giving them inclusive opportunities to participate in the same rigorous curriculum available to all students. Through SFAF's cooperative learning structures, students will work together to learn and will also be responsible for their teammates' learning using proven strategies to help each other master academic content. This training in and implementation of cooperative learning will directly support school staff in improving instructional practices and, therefore, student achievement in all content areas and will provide consistency of instruction for students.
The SFAF programs are school reform turnaround models based upon the integration of best practices for instruction, leadership support, data monitoring, professional development, and interventions for individual students that have been used in over 1,200 schools over the past 20 years, improving the achievement of more than two million children. Over 52 studies of the effectiveness of Success for All as a reform model in increasing student achievement have been conducted by over 30 researchers. Through these independent reviews of the research on and effects of Success for All, researchers have consistently found that implementation of Success for All has resulted in significant increases in student achievement in a variety of settings. Most recently, the Comprehensive School Reform Quality Center at the American Institutes for Research reviewed the research on 22 comprehensive school reform models and placed Success for All and only one other program in the highest category it awarded. The review cited 31 studies as conclusively showing evidence of the positive impact of Success for All. In addition, The Consortium for Policy Research in Education did a comparison study of Success for All, America's Choice, and the Accelerated Schools Project in its August 2009 "School Improvement by Design" report. The study showed that SFAF student scored 10 percent higher in reading proficiency than AC, ASC and all other comparison schools.

The Success for All Foundation employs a leadership staff with a wealth of experience in every capacity of education: teaching, school leadership, district leadership, and reform-based consulting and research. We have assembled consultants and employees with even more extensive experience in all these areas to serve as whole-school reform consultants and managers. They include former superintendents and assistant superintendents with records of turning around failing schools. The Success for All Foundation has provided support to over 1,000 schools with comprehensive turnaround. The Success for All Foundation's current resources, including field consulting staff, support staff and facilities are more than adequate to implement the projected activities in this proposal. Our total staff of 220 employees includes approximately 100 full time/part time field consulting staff. Two thirds of these field staff has more than 5 years experience with the Foundation. All have established records of strong and successful delivery service.

Initially, SFAF will assist the district in identifying a school leadership with the vision and capability to facilitate the needed changes. A needs analysis would be conducted in collaboration with school and district staff to build a common vision and sense of urgency. This needs analysis would culminate in a school improvement plan with clear goals, targets, and success measures. Data reviews of these goals and targets would be held monthly and conducted collaboratively by the SFAF consultant and district and school leadership. SFAF will utilize Professional Learning Communities (PLC) to facilitate this process. They work collaboratively with distributed leadership to analyze student data, refine instruction to improve results, and hold themselves accountable for the outcomes. Much of the focus in a PLC is on what each student needs to learn, how it is known when a student has learned it, and how teachers will respond when a student is having difficulty learning. In a PLC, educators use the collaborative power of team accountability to focus on interventions rather than letting students get to a point that they need remediation. Schools using the SFA TurnAround model have teachers that participate in at least two PLCs on a regular basis: one that focuses on what students are learning in reading and one that focuses on what students are learning in math.

Element II: Academic Performance
Curriculum Overview

The cooperative-learning structures described in Element I of this proposal will be supported an interactive instructional model known as the Cycle of Effective Instruction. This Cycle of Effective Instruction assists teachers in all content areas in effectively promoting student motivation for learning. This framework, described in the outline below, is used successfully across the curriculum to teach learning behaviors, cooperative learning standards, academic content, processes, strategies, and skills. The SFAF instructional consultant will train school staff in the implementation of this structure to improve and support student motivation, as well as create continuity for students.

Active Instruction: During Active Instruction the teacher explains new skills, concepts, or strategies by providing purposeful and deliberate modeling. Active Instruction is also a time for students to engage in guided practice before using concepts on their own.

Partner/Team Practice: The Partner/Team Practice portion of the lesson allows for the successful use of cooperative learning strategies described earlier and provides students with the opportunity to process new information through engagement with their peers. During Partner/Team Practice, the teacher continues to assist students through monitoring, intervening, prompting, and reinforcing positive learning behaviors.

Assessment: In every Success for All curriculum, both formal and informal assessments occur on an ongoing basis. This continual assessment allows teachers to determine if they need to return to earlier segments of the Cycle of Effective Instruction for more instruction or team practice.

Celebration: When mastery is determined using ongoing assessments, individual achievements are recognized and team contributions are celebrated.

Assessment Procedures

Student progress will be monitored on a weekly basis using classroom measures and on a quarterly basis using reading and math level assessment and three times per year benchmarks aligned with the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) and that provide a prediction of student performance on these assessments. Classroom measures include end of unit assessments that provide information on student master of standards and skills taught that week. End of quarter assessments for reading include either SRI or Gates-MacGinitie (district choice) that will provide information on student reading mastery levels and allow for the monitoring of student reading gains. End of quarter assessments for math include either GMADE or the SFAF math benchmark that will provide information on student math mastery levels and allow for the monitoring of student math gains. In addition, three times a year students will take a predictive benchmark that provides predictive information on student scores on the CSAP as well as information on which standards students need additional support before taking the state assessment. The benchmark currently used by the school's district will be used if such a benchmark is in place in the district or the district will secure the Colorado version of Acuity (McGraw-Hill) to be used for this purpose. The building schedule will be constructed in such a way that teachers meet in teams or PLCs for data analysis and planning on a weekly basis. These PLCs will be primarily responsible for analyzing and responding to this weekly and quarterly data.

Element III: Learning Environment
Through the Solutions Network, SFAF offers a School-wide Behavior Management Program that the SFAF Solutions consultant will help implement in each Colorado school it serves. Because the design of the School-wide Behavior Management Program will be based on the needs of each individual school, the SFAF Solutions consultant will help each school develop a plan through the following actions:
- Utilize multiple data collection points (discipline referrals, suspension/expulsion records, and surveys for administrators, teachers, parents, auxiliary staff, and students) to assess behavior "hot points" and determine interventions that have been successful.
- Use collected data to develop a comprehensive behavior management plan with behavior tracking mechanisms and timelines for testing and modifying the plan.
- At the beginning of the year, train the school staff in Proactive Behavior Management and support the implementation throughout the year.
- Implement Getting Along Together program.
- Provide behavior management support throughout the year, covering such topics as the ABC's of behavior, the cycle of off-task behavior, and managing the disruptive student.
- Review data at the end of the year and modify the behavior management plan in preparation for the next year.

At the beginning of the year, the SFAF instructional consultant will train the entire school staff in SFAF's Getting Along Together program, a K-8 social problem-solving curriculum designed to teach children to think critically, solve problems nonviolently, and work in teams effectively and cooperatively. By implementing the Getting Along Together program, SFAF will help each Colorado school establish school-wide processes for preventing and resolving conflicts among students, as well as between students and teachers both in and outside of the classroom. Benefits of Getting Along Together include:
- Ten interactive, literature-based lessons that introduce skills and strategies.
- Teacher's guides that provide structures for coaching individual students to resolve specific conflicts, conducting class meetings, setting positive expectations, rewarding positive peer interaction, and addressing class-selected issues as a group throughout the school year.
- Refinement and reinforcement of learned skills throughout the rest of the school year with weekly class meetings, additional instruction and coaching, and Peace Path and Think-It-Through strategy sheets in all classroom and common spaces throughout the school.

Because all school staff members, including the principal, teachers, cafeteria staff, and office staff, are trained and involved in the Getting Along Together process, it will promote an effective, consistent structure that the solutions coordinator and Cooperative Culture management team of the Solutions Network will reinforce throughout the year.

Parental Involvement

To support the involvement of families in the academic lives of their children, the Solutions Network at each school will use a Parent and Family Involvement Team led by a parent liaison. The SFAF Solutions consultant will work with the school's leadership to identify a current staff member who understands the needs of families in the school community to act as the parent liaison. This parent liaison will serve as the leader and coordinator of the Parent and Family Involvement team, which will consider school goals in targeting family involvement to the needs of the particular school. The parent liaison will also work to recruit at least one parent representative to serve on the team and ensure that the needs of families are represented within the school community.

Community Involvement

To better involve the community in the workings of the school and to draw upon resources from within the community, the SFAF Solutions consultant will assist the solutions coordinator in creating a Community Involvement Team. Members of the Solutions Network in each school will choose to work with the Community Involvement Team, under the guidance of the solutions coordinator and the support of the SFAF Solutions consultant. The Community Involvement Team will forge relationships with business and community partners able to provide assistance to students in a wide variety of areas and will draw upon the knowledge of the entire school staff in identifying and developing additional partnerships that would be particularly beneficial in helping the school reach its achievement targets. Before the school year starts, the Community Involvement Team will conduct a Community Needs Survey to determine how the school can best serve the community and vice versa.

Social Services

The SFAF Community Connections Team will also work to establish service provider partnerships that will secure social, emotional, and physical health for low-income students. The following are types of service provider partnerships that SFAF will work to establish, depending on the culture and climate of each school:
- Physical and Mental Health Services: Schools that have a need for physical and mental health services can meet these needs in a variety of ways. In the past, SFAF has established clinics by stationing service health providers onsite on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Other options include identifying health clinics and making them aware that school children and their families are in need of service providers with whom they feel comfortable and can trust, such as clinics with bilingual staff members.
- Food Services: The Community Connections Team will utilize the school as a food distribution site by linking with local agencies. By establishing this partnership, hungry students will be fed, and parents who rarely have an opportunity to visit the school building can come to pick up food, which will give them a chance to chat with staff members of the school.
- Shelter: Community Connections component members will establish working relationships with emergency shelter providers to help support a child while a family is homeless or in a temporary living situation. Component members will also help to plan transportation and additional support for homeless students. These types of partnerships allow homeless students to continue their schooling while having their living needs met.

1000+ Students:

The following is an overview of the services we provide schools and districts:

Element I: Organizational Management and Leadership
The Success for All Foundation, Inc. (SFAF) believes that all children can learn, regardless of their socioeconomic background, and that every school must work relentlessly to ensure students' educational success. With these beliefs at the core of the Success for All Foundation, our reform model is based upon the integration of best practices for instruction, leadership support, data monitoring, professional development, and interventions for individual students.
SFAF research-proven school reform revolves around the concept of cooperative learning. Cooperative learning will group students in four- to five-member teams to help each other master academic content. Dr. Robert Slavin, the co-founder and chairman of SFAF, has completed extensive research on the effects of cooperative learning and has identified the following positive characteristics as common to students who learn in cooperative settings:
- Higher achievement
- Increased retention of information
- More positive heterogeneous relationships
- Greater intrinsic motivation
- Higher self-esteem
- More on-task behavior
- Improved attitudes toward teachers and school

Because of the success of cooperative learning strategies on student motivation, engagement, and achievement, SFAF believes in the necessity of student interaction to facilitate learning and improve student achievement results, so the SFAF instructional consultant will assist district and school leadership in creating a school structure to support cooperative learning and train school staff in the Colorado schools served in using cooperative learning across the content areas as well as in reading. In addition, the use of cooperative learning strategies provides a highly effective instructional strategy for both special education and English language learners by giving them inclusive opportunities to participate in the same rigorous curriculum available to all students. Through SFAF's cooperative learning structures, students will work together to learn and will also be responsible for their teammates' learning using proven strategies to help each other master academic content. This training in and implementation of cooperative learning will directly support school staff in improving instructional practices and, therefore, student achievement in all content areas and will provide consistency of instruction for students.
The SFAF programs are school reform turnaround models based upon the integration of best practices for instruction, leadership support, data monitoring, professional development, and interventions for individual students that have been used in over 1,200 schools over the past 20 years, improving the achievement of more than two million children. Over 52 studies of the effectiveness of Success for All as a reform model in increasing student achievement have been conducted by over 30 researchers. Through these independent reviews of the research on and effects of Success for All, researchers have consistently found that implementation of Success for All has resulted in significant increases in student achievement in a variety of settings. Most recently, the Comprehensive School Reform Quality Center at the American Institutes for Research reviewed the research on 22 comprehensive school reform models and placed Success for All and only one other program in the highest category it awarded. The review cited 31 studies as conclusively showing evidence of the positive impact of Success for All. In addition, The Consortium for Policy Research in Education did a comparison study of Success for All, America's Choice, and the Accelerated Schools Project in its August 2009 "School Improvement by Design" report. The study showed that SFAF student scored 10 percent higher in reading proficiency than AC, ASC and all other comparison schools.

The Success for All Foundation employs a leadership staff with a wealth of experience in every capacity of education: teaching, school leadership, district leadership, and reform-based consulting and research. We have assembled consultants and employees with even more extensive experience in all these areas to serve as whole-school reform consultants and managers. They include former superintendents and assistant superintendents with records of turning around failing schools. The Success for All Foundation has provided support to over 1,000 schools with comprehensive turnaround. The Success for All Foundation's current resources, including field consulting staff, support staff and facilities are more than adequate to implement the projected activities in this proposal. Our total staff of 220 employees includes approximately 100 full time/part time field consulting staff. Two thirds of these field staff has more than 5 years experience with the Foundation. All have established records of strong and successful delivery service.

Initially, SFAF will assist the district in identifying a school leadership with the vision and capability to facilitate the needed changes. A needs analysis would be conducted in collaboration with school and district staff to build a common vision and sense of urgency. This needs analysis would culminate in a school improvement plan with clear goals, targets, and success measures. Data reviews of these goals and targets would be held monthly and conducted collaboratively by the SFAF consultant and district and school leadership. SFAF will utilize Professional Learning Communities (PLC) to facilitate this process. They work collaboratively with distributed leadership to analyze student data, refine instruction to improve results, and hold themselves accountable for the outcomes. Much of the focus in a PLC is on what each student needs to learn, how it is known when a student has learned it, and how teachers will respond when a student is having difficulty learning. In a PLC, educators use the collaborative power of team accountability to focus on interventions rather than letting students get to a point that they need remediation. Schools using the SFA TurnAround model have teachers that participate in at least two PLCs on a regular basis: one that focuses on what students are learning in reading and one that focuses on what students are learning in math.

Element II: Academic Performance
Curriculum Overview

The cooperative-learning structures described in Element I of this proposal will be supported an interactive instructional model known as the Cycle of Effective Instruction. This Cycle of Effective Instruction assists teachers in all content areas in effectively promoting student motivation for learning. This framework, described in the outline below, is used successfully across the curriculum to teach learning behaviors, cooperative learning standards, academic content, processes, strategies, and skills. The SFAF instructional consultant will train school staff in the implementation of this structure to improve and support student motivation, as well as create continuity for students.

Active Instruction: During Active Instruction the teacher explains new skills, concepts, or strategies by providing purposeful and deliberate modeling. Active Instruction is also a time for students to engage in guided practice before using concepts on their own.

Partner/Team Practice: The Partner/Team Practice portion of the lesson allows for the successful use of cooperative learning strategies described earlier and provides students with the opportunity to process new information through engagement with their peers. During Partner/Team Practice, the teacher continues to assist students through monitoring, intervening, prompting, and reinforcing positive learning behaviors.

Assessment: In every Success for All curriculum, both formal and informal assessments occur on an ongoing basis. This continual assessment allows teachers to determine if they need to return to earlier segments of the Cycle of Effective Instruction for more instruction or team practice.

Celebration: When mastery is determined using ongoing assessments, individual achievements are recognized and team contributions are celebrated.

Assessment Procedures

Student progress will be monitored on a weekly basis using classroom measures and on a quarterly basis using reading and math level assessment and three times per year benchmarks aligned with the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP) and that provide a prediction of student performance on these assessments. Classroom measures include end of unit assessments that provide information on student master of standards and skills taught that week. End of quarter assessments for reading include either SRI or Gates-MacGinitie (district choice) that will provide information on student reading mastery levels and allow for the monitoring of student reading gains. End of quarter assessments for math include either GMADE or the SFAF math benchmark that will provide information on student math mastery levels and allow for the monitoring of student math gains. In addition, three times a year students will take a predictive benchmark that provides predictive information on student scores on the CSAP as well as information on which standards students need additional support before taking the state assessment. The benchmark currently used by the school's district will be used if such a benchmark is in place in the district or the district will secure the Colorado version of Acuity (McGraw-Hill) to be used for this purpose. The building schedule will be constructed in such a way that teachers meet in teams or PLCs for data analysis and planning on a weekly basis. These PLCs will be primarily responsible for analyzing and responding to this weekly and quarterly data.

Element III: Learning Environment
Through the Solutions Network, SFAF offers a School-wide Behavior Management Program that the SFAF Solutions consultant will help implement in each Colorado school it serves. Because the design of the School-wide Behavior Management Program will be based on the needs of each individual school, the SFAF Solutions consultant will help each school develop a plan through the following actions:
- Utilize multiple data collection points (discipline referrals, suspension/expulsion records, and surveys for administrators, teachers, parents, auxiliary staff, and students) to assess behavior "hot points" and determine interventions that have been successful.
- Use collected data to develop a comprehensive behavior management plan with behavior tracking mechanisms and timelines for testing and modifying the plan.
- At the beginning of the year, train the school staff in Proactive Behavior Management and support the implementation throughout the year.
- Implement Getting Along Together program.
- Provide behavior management support throughout the year, covering such topics as the ABC's of behavior, the cycle of off-task behavior, and managing the disruptive student.
- Review data at the end of the year and modify the behavior management plan in preparation for the next year.

At the beginning of the year, the SFAF instructional consultant will train the entire school staff in SFAF's Getting Along Together program, a K-8 social problem-solving curriculum designed to teach children to think critically, solve problems nonviolently, and work in teams effectively and cooperatively. By implementing the Getting Along Together program, SFAF will help each Colorado school establish school-wide processes for preventing and resolving conflicts among students, as well as between students and teachers both in and outside of the classroom. Benefits of Getting Along Together include:
- Ten interactive, literature-based lessons that introduce skills and strategies.
- Teacher's guides that provide structures for coaching individual students to resolve specific conflicts, conducting class meetings, setting positive expectations, rewarding positive peer interaction, and addressing class-selected issues as a group throughout the school year.
- Refinement and reinforcement of learned skills throughout the rest of the school year with weekly class meetings, additional instruction and coaching, and Peace Path and Think-It-Through strategy sheets in all classroom and common spaces throughout the school.

Because all school staff members, including the principal, teachers, cafeteria staff, and office staff, are trained and involved in the Getting Along Together process, it will promote an effective, consistent structure that the solutions coordinator and Cooperative Culture management team of the Solutions Network will reinforce throughout the year.

Parental Involvement

To support the involvement of families in the academic lives of their children, the Solutions Network at each school will use a Parent and Family Involvement Team led by a parent liaison. The SFAF Solutions consultant will work with the school's leadership to identify a current staff member who understands the needs of families in the school community to act as the parent liaison. This parent liaison will serve as the leader and coordinator of the Parent and Family Involvement team, which will consider school goals in targeting family involvement to the needs of the particular school. The parent liaison will also work to recruit at least one parent representative to serve on the team and ensure that the needs of families are represented within the school community.

Community Involvement

To better involve the community in the workings of the school and to draw upon resources from within the community, the SFAF Solutions consultant will assist the solutions coordinator in creating a Community Involvement Team. Members of the Solutions Network in each school will choose to work with the Community Involvement Team, under the guidance of the solutions coordinator and the support of the SFAF Solutions consultant. The Community Involvement Team will forge relationships with business and community partners able to provide assistance to students in a wide variety of areas and will draw upon the knowledge of the entire school staff in identifying and developing additional partnerships that would be particularly beneficial in helping the school reach its achievement targets. Before the school year starts, the Community Involvement Team will conduct a Community Needs Survey to determine how the school can best serve the community and vice versa.

Social Services

The SFAF Community Connections Team will also work to establish service provider partnerships that will secure social, emotional, and physical health for low-income students. The following are types of service provider partnerships that SFAF will work to establish, depending on the culture and climate of each school:
- Physical and Mental Health Services: Schools that have a need for physical and mental health services can meet these needs in a variety of ways. In the past, SFAF has established clinics by stationing service health providers onsite on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Other options include identifying health clinics and making them aware that school children and their families are in need of service providers with whom they feel comfortable and can trust, such as clinics with bilingual staff members.
- Food Services: The Community Connections Team will utilize the school as a food distribution site by linking with local agencies. By establishing this partnership, hungry students will be fed, and parents who rarely have an opportunity to visit the school building can come to pick up food, which will give them a chance to chat with staff members of the school.
- Shelter: Community Connections component members will establish working relationships with emergency shelter providers to help support a child while a family is homeless or in a temporary living situation. Component members will also help to plan transportation and additional support for homeless students. These types of partnerships allow homeless students to continue their schooling while having their living needs met.

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