The Colorado Department of Education

Offices | Staff Contacts | Colorado.gov

Educational Service Providers - Provider Detail

The information provided regarding Educational Service Providers is provided for information only. The Colorado Department of Education does not endorse, represent or warrant the accuracy or reliability of any of the information, content, services or other materials provided by these educational service providers. Any reliance upon any information, content, materials, products, services or vendors included on or found through this listing shall be at the user's sole risk.

Provider

Greta Educational Consulting, LLC

Contact Information

Primary

Isobel Stevenson
3256 Alcott Street
Lafayette, CO 80211

Phone: (720) 641-4619
Email: ips1012@gmail.com

Secondary

Sammye Wheeler-Clouse
14015 W.Exposition Place
Lakewood, CO 80228

Phone: (303) 919-0160
Email: swheelerclouse@gmail.com

General Information

Website: gretaeducationalconsulting.com
Type of Organization: For Profit Company
Organization is best described as: For-Profit
Age of Firm / Number of Years in Operation: 1
Level(s) services may be provided: - Elementary
- Middle
- High School
- District
Provides performance guarantees in contract: NO
Educational Services Provided Comprehensive & Effective Planning
Comprehensive Turnaround Provider
Diagnostic Review
District Culture
Educator Effectiveness
Leadership
Professional Development
School and District Improvement
Unified Improvement Planning

Name of Schools/ Districts that this organization has served in Colorado:

References inside Colorado: (last 12 months)
• David G. Wirth, Principal
o Wheat Ridge High School, Jefferson County School District
o 9505 West 32nd, Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
o (303)9827695
• Shelly Landgraff, Director of Human Resources
o Boulder Valley School District
o 6500 Arapahoe Road Boulder, CO 80303
o (720)561-5080

Recent References:

• Beverly Kingery, Superintendent
o Nicholas County School District, West Virginia
o 400 Old Main Drive, Summersville, WV 26651
o (304)872-3611
• Cyndi Mill, Assistant Superintendent
o Dysart Unified School District, Arizona
o 15802 North Parkview Place, Surprise, Arizona 85374
o (623)8767000
• Carter Hillman, Principal
o East Wake High School of Health Science
o 5101 Rolesville Road, Wendell, NC 27591
o (919)365-2634

Name of Schools/ Districts that this organization has served in other states:

• Acha Ignacia Demapan, Principal
o Kagman Elementary School, Common Wealth of the Northern Marianna Islands Public Schools
o PO BOX 501370, CNMI Retirement Building Saipan, MP 96950
o (670)2373967
• Beth Folger, Assistant, Superintendent
o Guildford County School District
o 712 North Eugene Street, Greensboro, NC 27401
o 3368100
• Catherine Rich, Principal
o Phalen Lake Elementary Hmong Studies Magnet School, Saint Paul Public Schools
o 1089 Cypress Street, Saint Paul, MN 55106
o (651)293-8935

Qualifications of this Organization (licensure, trademark, etc.):

Greta Educational Consulting LLC is a team of educators who are passionate about school leadership and its impact on the source of hope and possibility for our youth, their education. Among us we have 97 years of experience as classroom teachers, school leaders, district leaders, consultants and university teachers. We have served small and large districts in many different states and countries. We have led diverse schools and schools with homogenous populations. We have earned doctoral degrees in educational leadership and hold principal and administrative licensures because we yearn to be better prepared to answer the challenging questions of our profession. Our resumes speak to our broad knowledge and experience. We met each other over ten years ago in Boulder Valley School District. We are just now creating opportunities to work together in a new, more expansive way, blending our talents and personalities to support leaders statewide.

Qualifications of Instructors/ Staff that Provide Services:

Ellen Miller-Brown
3256 Alcott Street
Denver, Colorado 80211
(720) 561-5913
ellenmb00@gmail.com
Objective
To promote quality education for high student achievement, performance and well being
Academic Background
Ph.D. University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 1997; Major:
Multicultural Teacher and Childhood Education
MA University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 1979; Major: Reading
BA Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 1974; Major:
English, Minor: Education; Phi Beta Kappa
Experience
January 2007 – present Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO
Chief Academic Officer in a district of 30,000 students and 4,000 employees
 Lead five departments for instructional accountability and district wide professional development
 Facilitate assistant superintendent and director selection process
 Support and evaluate assistant superintendents and executive directors
 Serve as the district AVID Coordinator for four AVID sites
 Facilitate the New Administrator Training and the New Site Administrator Academy for all new administrators
 Coordinate Equity initiatives and commitments
January, 2004-2007 Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO
Director of K-8 and Middle School Leadership
 Support and evaluate nineteen middle and elementary principals in 2004-05; support and evaluate twelve K-8 and middle level principals in 2005-present
 Facilitate principal and assistant principal selection process, selecting thirteen administrators for Boulder Valley
2005-2012 University of Colorado at Denver
Lecturer for Boulder Valley School Leadership Academy
 Facilitate the learning of future school-based and district leaders
2000-2004 Casey Middle School, Boulder, CO
Principal of a school of 360 students
 Earn Education Trust award in 2002 for high achievement
 Secure funding for Pre-AP, AVID and PEBC facilitation
 Create systems for job-embedded professional development
 Selected as first NMSA/ASCD Colorado Trailblazer Schools to Watch School
1998-2000 Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM
Director of Professional Development in a district of 88,000 students
 Merge two professional development departments and provide professional development for all role groups in district
 Facilitate leadership teams that advise the superintendent
 Facilitate standards-based system development
1994-1998 Truman Middle School, Albuquerque, NM
Principal of a school of 1,100 students
 Receive Strengthening Quality in the Schools Piñon Award
 Coordinate, unify, and manage $3.5 million budget
 Secure an early literacy program for three- and four-year-olds
 Establish GED and ESL classes for parents
 Become a Carnegie school
Spring and Fall, 1998 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Professor of CIMTE 506 and CIMTE 509
 Provide instruction in current research on middle level student development and appropriate school and classroom structures
 Provide instruction on middle level pedagogy
1990-1994 Van Buren Middle School, Albuquerque, NM
Assistant Principal of a school of 560 students
 Coordinate the Blue Ribbon Award application team
 Develop a school-based Human Service Collaborative
 Coordinate activities of the Professional Development School with the University of New Mexico
 Direct interdisciplinary planning for all classrooms
1986-1990 Hayes Middle School, Albuquerque, NM
Reading Consultant
 Facilitate professional development for all staff members
 Team-teach science, math, social studies, language arts, literature and art classes at all grade levels
 Secure funding for Project SHARE, an interage literacy program
 Provide instruction in drama, organize dinner and dessert theaters, and supervise performances by students at retirement centers
 Publish “Teachers Reflect on Change,” Educational Leadership, February 1987
 Publish in Readings from Educational Leadership: Coaching and Staff Development, Spring 1989
Spring and Fall, 1986 University of New Mexico and Continuing
Education, Albuquerque, NM
Teacher of Classroom Teachers
 Provide instruction in current research and practice concerning literacy acquisition
 Demonstrate instructional strategies
 Evaluate professional growth of students
1984-1986 South and North Area Offices, Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM
Staff Development Facilitator
 Design literacy professional development with principals and school leadership groups in five schools
 Provide demonstration teaching and on-going staff development
 Promote literacy-based activities through teacher study groups
1983-1984 Ernie Pyle Middle School, Albuquerque, NM
Chapter I Teacher
 Provide instruction in math and reading to grades 6-8
 Maintain records for students in the program
1982-1983 Adobe Acres Elementary School, Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, NM
Chapter I Teacher
 Provide instruction in reading and writing to third graders
 Publish student work
1975-1981 Tucson High School, Tucson, AZ
Classroom Teacher
 Teach English composition and literature to grades 10 and 12
 Provide real world instruction to at-risk readers
 Teach bilingual literacy to first and second year Spanish students
1974-1975 Colegio Regional de Bayamón, Bayamón, PR
ESL Teacher
 Provide ESL instruction to adults
Awards
April, 2003
Impact on Education Award, Boulder Foundation
September, 2003
I Have A Dream Foundation Dream-Maker Award Winner
Professional and Civic Affiliations
 Mentor for a student in the Challenge Foundation, 2005-present
 Chair, Colorado Principals’ Center, 2006-07
 President, Arapahoe House (A non-profit corporation dedicated to serving people with drug, substance abuse and behavioral health issues), 2007-08
 Member, Colorado Association of School Executives
 Member, Phi Delta Kappa
 Member, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
References
Available upon request

ISOBEL PAGE STEVENSON
2318 Sandpiper Drive, Lafayette, CO 80026
Telephone: 720-641-4619; E-mail: ips1012@gmail.com
Academic Qualifications
2013 PhD, Human and Organizational Systems, Fielding Graduate University
2010 MA, Human Development, Fielding Graduate University
1996 MEd, Special Education, University of Texas at Austin
1994 Summer Seminar Fellowship, National Endowment for the Humanities, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington, 1994.
1987 BA with Honors, Geography, Oxford University
Professional Qualifications
2011 Evidence-based Coaching Certificate, Fielding Graduate University
1998 Principal License, Educational Leadership Program, University of Texas at Austin
1989 Post-Graduate Certificate in Education, Oxford University
Employment History
Current Independent coach and consultant
Coaching for school leaders (references available on request)
Consultant to Catholic Principals Council of Ontario on the development of their coaching training program
Fall 2011 Lecturer, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver
Taught in the Ritchie Program, a nationally recognized, cohort-based principal preparation program focusing particularly on preparing leaders for diverse urban high needs/turnaround schools; field supervisor for Ritchie interns
2007-2011 Chief Academic Officer, School District 27J, Brighton, CO
CAO is responsible for the entire instructional program, including curriculum and instruction, staff development, interventions, assessment, ESL, gifted and talented, and special education; supervises six directors and directs the district’s leadership development program, which includes coaching principals
2001-2007 Principal, Angevine Middle School, Lafayette, CO (BVSD)
Angevine is a diverse school with several programs that make it distinct among BVSD middle schools, including AVID, READ 180, Dual Language Program, and Pre-engineering (Project Lead the Way). The school won a CAMLE Pathfinder Program to Watch Award in 2005 and has been asked to present at NABE, CASE, CAMLE, the Schools to Watch Conference, and CCIRA
2
1998-2001 Principal, Burbank Middle School, Boulder, CO (BVSD)
While I was principal, the school had two programs: a neighborhood program and a Core Knowledge program
1996-1998 Assistant Principal, Martin Junior High School, Austin, TX (AISD)
I fulfilled typical responsibilities for an assistant principal, including discipline, supervising the special education and gifted and talented programs, campus safety, and design of the master schedule
1995-1996 Curriculum and Professional Development Coordinator (funded by a Federal School-to-Work grant through the Capital Area Training Foundation), Austin, TX
I held this position full time for six months, and, subsequently, in addition to teaching part-time. I was part of a multi-million dollar grant, and my responsibilities included administering a large professional development budget, working with principals to provide professional development in standards-based education, curriculum alignment, authentic assessment, and applied learning, and coordinating math curriculum alignment throughout the vertical team, in partnership with Uri Treisman, the Dana Center, University of Texas
1993-1996 Geography Teacher, Liberal Arts Academy, Johnston High School, Austin, TX (AISD)
The Liberal Arts Academy was set up as a magnet program, a school within a school, to attract students from all over the district as part of the district’s desegregation plan. I wrote the curriculum for, and taught, the 9th grade honors geography classes
1992-1993 Special Education Teacher, Johnston High School, Austin, TX (AISD)
Taught Language Arts to students who qualified for special education services as learning disabled
1990-1992 Variety of substitute teaching positions while in graduate school and qualifying for a Texas teaching license (I had to repeat student teaching as the state would not accept my English teaching license)
1989-1990 Geography Teacher, Great Cornard Upper School, Suffolk, England
Taught the equivalent of grades 8-12. In addition to the normal teaching responsibilities, I co-directed three multi-day field trips, to South Wales, to Norfolk, and to Amsterdam
1987-1988 Care Worker in two different residential settings: Greenwood School, Essex, England, and Cotswold Community, Wiltshire, England
Worked with children who had been placed in residential facilities because they had either been removed from the home or had been unsuccessful in all other educational settings
Other professional experience
1994-1996 Member of the Geography AP Committee for the College Board
3
This was the committee that wrote the first ever AP syllabus and exam in Geography
1993-1996 Teacher Leader for the Texas Alliance for Geography Education, funded through the National Geographic Society
Led two week summer workshops for secondary teachers at Southwest Texas State University and other professional development across the state

Wheeler-Clouse Resume - 1
SAMMYE WHEELER-CLOUSE, PhD 14015 West Exposition Place
Lakewood, Colorado 80228
(303) 9190160
EDUCATION
Ph.D. Innovation and Leadership, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, 1999
M.A. Curriculum and Instruction, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, 1992
B.A. Speech Communications, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, 1972
SPECIFIC AREAS OF EXPERTISE
 District and school systems improvement for systemic continuous improvement
 Leadership advancement focused on problem-solving, management and communication skills
 Curriculum development and instructional strategies implementation
 High school redesign and reform
 Research-based practices focused on student achievement and motivation
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
2006 – present MID-CONTINENT RESEARCH FOR EDUCATION AND LEARNING (McREL), Denver, CO
Principal Consultant
 Implemented continuous improvement approach in schools and districts national and internationally
o Northeast High School, North Carolina, with increase in proficiency of 9% in some state-tested courses up to 35% in others over two years.
o Richwood High School, West Virgina, with increase of 7% in math on WESTEST in the first year and 8.9% in ELA and 8% in math the second year.
o Three schools (elementary, middle, and high schools) Saipan with a focus on research-based instructional strategies.
o Cree Indian Nation, Canada, district level administrators to support implementation of school improvement in their schools.
o Rockingham County School District, North Carolina, with emphasis on data analysis in with 26 school leadership teams and technical assistance with two schools.
o Minnesota State Department as support for high school redesign and reform, working directly with Spring Lake Park High School.
o Seven schools, three in St. Paul, Minnesota and four in Missouri, for two years, as a part of a federal IES study to determine that the school improvement process is research-based.
Wheeler-Clouse Resume - 2
 Designed and led training Dysart Unified School District, Arizona, Central Office staff and four school leadership teams on the steps for developing a positive school culture for learning.
 Developed and implemented a K-5 Literacy Framework for Guilford County School District, North Carolina, which includes writing and oral language. Developed a systemic structure and plan for implementation, and a systemic Oral Language program.
 Led training in research-based practices for effective teams, high school transition models, instructional practices, and curriculum alignment, and facilitated the development and implementation of a 9th grade interdisciplinary academy in Temecula Valley High School, California, 9th grade Transitional Academy.
2003-2006 ADAMS 12 FIVE STAR SCHOOL DISTRICT, Thornton, Colorado
Assistant Superintendent for Learning Services
Chief Academic Officer for a school district of 38,000 students and 4000+ employees.
 Aligned supervision, principal expectations, and administrative evaluation of schools
 Lead the following departments:
o Staff Development
o Curriculum and Instruction
o Student Services
o English Language Learners
o Grants
o Title I
o Athletics
2001-2003 BOULDER VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT, Boulder, Colorado
Director of Secondary Education
Supervised and lead high schools and middle schools for Boulder Valley School District
 Provided and planned professional development for secondary principals
 Served as Liaison to several county and city agencies
 Supervised discipline and expulsions
1996-2001 PRAIRIE MIDDLE SCHOOL, Cherry Creek School District, Aurora, Colorado
Principal
Lead a school of 1600 middle school students and 160 staff members
 Planned and implemented ‘Think Tank’ for school improvement through the use of data
 Directed the curriculum and instruction for all disciplines, aligning with state standard
 Provided support for new teachers and supervised all new teachers
 Managed personnel, budget, and facility
1994-1996 CHALLENGER MIDDLE SCHOOL, Air Academy District 20, Colorado Springs, CO
Principal
Wheeler-Clouse Resume - 3
Lead a school of 1300 middle school students and 100 staff members.
 Instructional leader for all curriculum and instruction for the school.
 Managed personnel, budget, and facility
 Identified dysfunctional school community climate and implemented consensus-building decision-making process resulting in a more collaborative, cohesive school community focused on student achievement.
1984-1994 DOUGLAS COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT, Castle Rock, Colorado
Assistant Principal, Cresthill Middle School (1990-1994)
 Supported and supervised instruction and curriculum for 7th and 8th grade
 Managed the disciple for one grade level
Public Information Coordinator (1989-1990)
 Provided communication for district to community and media
 Supported the School Board in all communication efforts
 District leader for the District School Improvement Team
Teacher, Ponderosa High School (1984-1989)
 Taught Speech, Debate, and Sophomore Writing
SELECTED PRESENTATIONS
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2011). How to Monitor UIP Goals and Strategies Effectively. Colorado Association of School Executives, Breckenridge, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2009). Taking on the World: Step by Step. National Title I Conference, San Antonio, TX.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2009). School Improvement: Getting Success in Sight. Presented at the Colorado Association of School Executives, Breckenridge, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2007). Working Together for School Improvement. Presented at the National Staff Development Council Conference. Dallas, TX.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2007). School Improvement Through Systemic Change. Presented at the Colorado Association of School Boards. Colorado Springs, Colorado, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2007). Professional Communities of Inquiry. Presented (panel) at the American Evaluators Association Conference. Baltimore, Maryland.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2007). Taking on the World ... Step by Step, Developing a Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum. Presented at the Colorado Association of School Executives Convention. Breckenridge, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2004). Using Walk Throughs as a Strategy for School Improvement, and Avoiding Checkmate: No Special Students Left Behind. Presented at the Colorado Association of School Executives. Breckenridge, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2003). Making Teams Work Effectively by Focusing on Student Work, and Colorado Trailblazers Schools to Watch. Presented at the Colorado Association of Middle Level Education. Beavercreek, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2003). Middle Level Reform for the 21st Century Age of Accountability. Presented at the Northeast Colorado Regional BOCES; Middle Level educator inservice. Longmont, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2003). Colorado Trailblazers Schools to Watch. Presented at the Colorado
Wheeler-Clouse Resume - 4
Association of School Executive. Breckenridge, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2002). Bully Proofing for Adults. Presented at Boulder Valley School District: Emerald Elementary School. Broomfield, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2002). Effective Teams: Making Them Work. Presented at the Colorado Association of Middle Level Education. Beavercreek, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2002). Too Much on the Plate. Presented at the Colorado State Standards Conference Breckenridge, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (2000). Issues of the Principalship. Presented at the University of Phoenix. Denver, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1999). Aspects, Goals, and Challenges of the 21st Century School Leader. Presented at the University of Phoenix. Denver, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1998). Algebra for All. Presented at the Columbus Public Schools District, Secondary Principal Workshop. Columbus, OH.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1996). A Program to Raise Student Achievement. Presented at the National Institute for Adolescents with Behavior Disorders Conference. Snowmass, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1996). Important Steps for Success as a First-Year Principal. Presented at the University of Phoenix. Denver, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1996). Implementing Character Education from the Ground UP. Presented at the National Character Education Conference. San Diego, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1996). Meeting the Needs of the Gifted Student Within a Middle School Structure. Presented at the Western Regional Middle School Conference. Reno, NV.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1995). Managing School Success Through Shared-Decision Making. Presented at the Colorado Association of Middle Level Education. Vail, CO.
Wheeler-Clouse, S. (1995). Important Steps for Success as a First-Year Principal. Presented at the University of Colorado Springs. CO.
PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS
 Colorado Association of School Executives, 1989-present
 American Association of School Administrators, 2003-present
 National Association of Secondary School Principals, 1994-present
 Phi Delta kappa, 1990-present
 National Staff Development Council, 2001-present
 National Middle School Association, 1990-present
 Colorado Association of Middle Level Education, 1991-2006
o President, 2003-2004

Cost:

A detailed table of services and costs will be provided upon request, as this electronic format does not allow for insertion of tables.

We customize services for districts and schools based on the size and specific needs. Thus, the costs listed here are flexible accordingly.

• Comprehensive and Effective Planning
o Strategic planning at the district, administrative, school level
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Comprehensive and Effective Strategic Planning Time Cost
Pre-planning with client ½ day $300
On-site days with district/school focus groups
• Community
• Administrators
• Teachers
• Students 2-4 days $1200- $2400 (one consultant)
Technical assistance with client throughout project = 1 day 4, two-hour conference = 1 day $600
Final Strategic Plan document development 2 days $1200
Consultant preparation and planning 3 days $1800
Total estimated cost for Comprehensive and Effective Strategic Planning 11 ½ - 13 ½ days $5100 - $6300

• Comprehensive Turnaround Provider
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Comprehensive Turnaround Provider Time Cost
Professional development with staff at beginning of process 2 days $1200 (per consultant)
One day each month technical assistance with School Leadership Team 10 months = 10 days $6000
2 data analysis professional development days and group technical assistance with whole staff 2 days $1200
1 day each month principal coaching and technical assistance 10 months = 10 days $6000
½ day per month coaching and technical assistance via distance 5 days $3000
1 1/2 consultant preparation and planning days per month 15 days $9000
Total estimated cost for Comprehensive Turnaround Provider 44 days $26,400

• Diagnostic Review
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Diagnostic Review Time Cost
Electronic survey administered and analyzed 1 day $600
4 days on-site interviews with
• Administrators
• Staff
• Students
• Parents 4 days $2400 (per consultant)
1 day data analysis and research 1 day $600
2 days report development 2 days $1200
½ day small group presentation and technical assistance with administrators ½ day $300
½ day large group presentation to school community ½ day $300
1 day consultant planning and preparation 1 day $600
Total estimated cost for Comprehensive Turnaround Provider 10 days $6000

• District Culture
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for District Culture Time Cost
Electronic survey administered and analyzed 2 days $1200
3 two-day Professional Development throughout first year 6 days $3600 (per consultant)
6 technical assistance days with Superintendent and staff throughout year 6 $3600
4 consultant preparation and planning days 4 $2400
Total estimated cost for District Culture 18 days $10,800

• Educator Effectiveness
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Educator Effectiveness Time Cost
6 large group facilitation and professional development 6 $3600 (per consultant)
3 - ½ days technical assistance 1 ½ $900
3 days on-site coaching and observations 3 $1800
3 – ½ days consultant preparation and planning 1 ½ $900
Total estimated cost for Educator Effectiveness 12 days $7200


• Leadership
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Leadership Time Cost
5, one-day professional development – leadership team and/or cohort of administrators 5 days $3000 (per consultant)
8, ½ days technical assistance on-site or via distance 4 days $2400
8, ½ days leadership coaching 4 days $2400
5 days of consulting preparation and planning 5 days $3000
Total estimated cost for Leadership 18 $10,800


• Professional Development
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Professional Development Time Cost
5 days team/s professional development 5 days $3000 (per consultant)
6, ½ days technical assistance on-site or via distance 3 days $1800
5 days consultant preparation and planning 5 $3000
Total estimated cost for Professional Development 13 days $7800

• School and District Improvement
o School and District Improvement All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for School and District Improvement Time Cost
4 days data analysis professional development (e.g., District staff, School Board, school staff) 4 days $2400 (per consultant)
2, one-day technical assistance developing UIP plan 2 days $1200
4, ½ days of technical assistance and follow up on-site or via distance 2 days $1200
5 days consultant preparation and planning 5 days $3000
Total estimated cost for School and District Improvement 13 days $7800

• Unified Improvement Planning
o All costs are based on $600 per day, per consultant
o Number of consultants required depends on the size of the group
o Client is responsible for travel time and costs which are not included
o Materials and publications are not included in the costs
Detailed services for Unified Improvement Planning Time Cost
2-4 days data analysis professional development with whole staff 2 -4 days $1200 - $2400 (per consultant)
2 days technical assistance for goal setting, strategies identification, and communication planning 2 days $1200
1 day implementation and monitoring development 1 day $600
4, ½ days of technical assistance for implementation and follow up 2 days $1200
5 days consultant preparation and planning 5 days $3000
Total estimated cost for Unified Improvement Planning 12 – 14 days $7200 - $8400

Explanation of how we are able to provide differentiated services to meet the individual needs of schools and districts.

Because we have so much experience in leadership designed to provide differentiated services to districts, schools and classrooms, we are confident we can provide services throughout the state to meet unique needs of schools and districts. Two aspects of our approach are conducive to delivering tailored services:
• our interest in and ability to build relationships with the people we serve, learning from their strengths and challenges and honoring their hopes and knowledge of their contexts and
• our expertise in collecting and analyzing data so that it presents a picture from which our clients can learn.
Through systematic, inquiry-based processes designed to build trust and safety, we support educators to envision improved outcomes, prioritize challenges based on their data, confront their highest leverage problems, develop theories of action, create SMART goals and design major improvement strategies, evidence to monitor their impact and a timeline for progress conversations. Professional development needed by staffs to deliver the major improvement strategies with fidelity is assessed. Collaborative, interactive problem solving approaches are used to ensure diverse needs are revealed and explored.

How will we evaluate our services and support to schools and districts and its effectiveness in school/ district/ student achievement?

Our evaluation process is tailored to the services we have provided. Our goal is always to base our evaluation on student achievement, although this may not be realistic if the contract with a client is short in duration. Typically, then, our evaluation would comprise some combination of the following:
• Student achievement data from a variety of sources, including standardized tests when appropriate, and also informal assessments
• Perceptual data from participants in workshops, planning sessions, and coaching
• Implementation data from relevant observations such as classroom walkthroughs

Sample of services offered for a school or district:

Under 500 Students:

Our team has a wealth of experience in strategic planning that we bring to bear in assisting schools and districts with developing their UIP. We follow a process that is designed to develop the client’s capacity to gather and analyze their data and take action steps to improve their achievement. While this work is tailored to fit the needs of individual clients (whether schools or districts), a typical approach might include:
• Analyzing the client’s systems for collecting and analyzing data and ascertaining their efficiency and effectiveness;
• Providing training in data analysis, including working with median student growth scores and identifying achievement gaps;
• Facilitating setting performance targets and interim measures;
• Providing research in best practices to address priority performance challenges;
• Designing and providing professional development related to implementing major improvement strategies;
• Designing systems for monitoring implementation of major improvement strategies;
• Facilitating alignment of district mission, vision, policies and practices;
• Providing coaching for leaders who need support with any aspect of the process on an individual basis.

500-1000 Students:

500-1000 Students:

In assessing and enhancing a small school culture, our team follows an interactive, data-based, reflective approach. First we meet with the administrative team at the school to clarify their expectations and learn about their culture’s strengths and challenges. Next we meet with the entire staff and through engaging activities, build trust between the consultants and the staff. We explain the purpose of our work and the processes we use to build the capacity of the staff eventually to invigorate their own culture. We administer an electronic survey focusing on attributes of a healthy school culture, allowing staff to anonymously rate their school on the level of attributes currently in existence. Once data are collected and analyzed, focus groups are held to clarify and deepen the consultants’ and school’s knowledge of the data. A report on school culture data is presented to the administrative team and then the staff. An interactive inquiry process would ensue, proceeding from the data, to envisioning an ideal state for their culture, writing collective statements of prioritized challenges and strategies that would impact the challenges and check-in points throughout the year to “take the temperature” of the culture: what’s working and what needs to change to reach the original vision of their ideal school culture. These “check-in points,” staff meetings, could be lively and fun yet productive, supporting the school in its quest to reach its goals. At the end of each check-in, people are selected to take responsibility for the current challenges. In that way, problems are addressed and people see that the commitment to cultural change is real and progressing. Small group or individual meetings with the consultants are held at mid-point in the year, and at the end of this progressive process, the survey is again conducted and results are shared in a report and in a whole staff presentation.

1000+ Students:

Module Design
Needs Assessment
Prior to all modules, participants will pre-assess their level of leadership for the relevant standard using the Colorado Principal Standards. Module materials, activities and coaching approaches will be differentiated based on the results of participants’ self-assessment.
Outcomes
Module 1: Strategic Leadership (Standard 1)
After engaging in Module 1, participants will
• Collaboratively lead processes to develop or revitalize the values, vision, mission, expectations and goals of their school’s community
• Create a UIP with staff that includes high-leverage improvement strategies and data-based progress monitoring for improved achievement for every student
• Lead the school community in a culture of continuous improvement and change
• Intentionally develop the school community to collectively lead and make decisions related to the UIP
Module 2: Culture and Equity Leadership (Standard 3)
After engaging in Module 2, participants will
• Create an inclusive and welcoming climate that supports high achievement for a diverse population of students, as well as their cognitive, physical, social and emotional health
• Create a UIP with staff that includes high-leverage improvement strategies and data-based progress monitoring for improved achievement for every student
Module 3: Instructional Leadership(Standards 2 and 4)
After engaging in Module 3, participants will
• Lead, execute, and monitor evidence-based curriculum, instruction, and assessment at a variety of levels: individuals to school-wide
• Refine curriculum and instruction based on data
• Support and monitor bell-to-bell instruction
• Develop a system for staff members to meet PD needs related to the school’s vision for good instruction
Module 4: Strategic Leadership for External Development (Standard 6)
After engaging in Module 4, participants will
• Collaboratively lead processes to engage families and the community in their school
• Collaborate with teachers, peers, and central office staff to improve student achievement
• Advocate for their school in order to leverage resources based on UIP goals and initiatives

Module 5: Human Resource and Managerial Leadership (Standards 4 and 5)
After engaging in Module 5, participants will
• Align resources with school goals for student achievement and growth
• Use processes to resolve conflict respectfully and effectively
• Manage processes for achieving a highly qualified staff
• Communicate effectively
Sample Activities
The following are examples of activities that will provide opportunity for participants to meet the above-stated outcomes. Participants will be expected to apply the structures and processes from the activities through collaborative teams at their schools.
• Sample Module 1 activity: Participants will sit or be online in groups of three. They will engage in a Tuning Protocol for Tuning a Plan (http://www.nsrfharmony.org/protocol/doc/tuning_plan.pd ) in which each person brings a plan for engaging his/her school community in the development or revitalizing of their values, vision and mission to the small group for feedback and guidance, refining their plan before engaging in it.
• Sample Module 1 activity: Participants will divide into groups of 4-5. They will practice a Temperature Check activity in which one member “role plays” leading the group in an activity to uncover the celebrations and challenges of implementing the UIP. For concerns, people will offer recommendations. All comments are received without response. At the end of the activity, people offer to be responsible for any items that need resolution. Feedback is shared with the leader about ways in which the activity could be more engaging, collaborative or valuable. Within the next two weeks, each group member will lead this activity at their school and video tape it for feedback from the group.
• Sample Module 2 activity: Participants complete the Teaching Diverse Students School Survey (http://www.tolerance.org/tdsi/schools-survey ) with their school leadership teams and bring what they learned from the experience to the next workshop. In small groups, they will share their learning and work on developing steps for their UIP in order to increase equity of learning outcomes for diverse learners.
• Sample Module 2 activity: Participants sit in groups of five. Each participant brings artifacts from their collaborative team meetings. Using a critical friends protocol, each person shares how the artifacts are based on student outcomes and supportive of the UIP goals.
• Sample Module 3 activity: Participants sit in groups of five. Each participant brings school data from Reading at one grade level. Each participant determines the most challenging common core objective from their school’s data they have provided. Using a structured inquiry-based process each person at the table shares the objective that needs support, and how they, as the instructional leader, will support their staff to increase student learning on this objective.
• Sample Module 3 activity: Participants sit in groups of five. Each participant brings notes and/or a video from a recent teaching observation. Participants use these to delve into their assumptions about good instruction and use reflections to become more intentional about their instructional leadership.
• Sample Module 4 activity: Participants will engage in a World Café with the focus of collaboration structures and processes for advocating for school needs.
• Sample Module 4 activity: Participants will create a communication plan involving all stakeholders.
• Sample Module 5 activity: Participants will develop and share in small groups creative and interactive processes for engaging their staff members in a development or revision of norms of interaction in a professional learning community, including ways in which people bring concerns about potential problems in the school to create an “anticipatory” culture.
• Sample Module 5 activity: Participants will conduct a focus group of teachers at their school to learn about the practices of previous supervisors or colleagues that have most positively impacted their performance. The participants will bring this information to their colleagues online or face-to-face in a Gallery Walk format and collectively determine those best practices that will support them as leaders to lead a supervision and evaluation system in their school that is engaging, inspirational and results-oriented.

<< Return to Provider List