New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

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Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Fundamental Pathway
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Anatomical awareness heightens movement potential

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Discuss how dance can contribute to fitness, wellness, and a positive self-image (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify joints used for mobility, and relate anatomy to movement (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify key anatomical elements that contribute to varying dance movements (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe how developing strength, flexibility, and endurance through dance contributes to fitness and wellness (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one feel differently about his or her body when participating in dance class?
  2. In what ways does a dancer make informed choices about his or her health and wellness that may be different than a non-dancer?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Kinesiologists and physical therapists study body movement to understand the intricacies of human musculature, and to treat and prevent injuries
  2. Fitness and wellness software and online resources can provide tools for monitoring diet, exercise, and one's general health and wellness.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers who understand how and why their body moves demonstrate high levels of technical proficiency.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Articulate correlations among anatomy, kinesiology, and dance movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Name major muscle groups and their affect on joint movement (DOK 1-2)
  2. Name major muscle groups and their engaged affect on joint movement (DOK 1-3)
  3. Use proper anatomical vocabulary to describe muscle action (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How would you move if you had no muscles or bones?
  2. How do bones and muscles work together?
  3. Which muscles initiate a given dance movement such as grand jeté?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Because the human body was designed for motion, anatomical awareness learned in dance can be applied to all effort actions as a means to grasp concepts in physics and body sciences.
  2. Video images and split-screen presentation boards can be used to show real-world photos of movement with overlays of muscle groups and bones that are used for captured movement.
  3. Dancers can use scientific principles and concepts to understand muscular development and proper conditioning to improve movement.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers understand that the infrastructures of the body (a dancer's instrument) have greatly improved the teaching of dance and the learning of choreography.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Develop a proper nutrition regimen for dance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Design an appropriate dietary regimen to complement anticipated dance activity needs (DOK 2-4)
  2. Design an appropriate schedule to ensure fuel intake, rest, and relaxation to support dance activities (DOK 2-4)
  3. Integrate appropriate nutrition, wellness, and fitness into daily lifestyle (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Are dancer's athletes, artists - or both? Why?
  2. What is a healthy dancer?
  3. Do dancers require more, less, or the same caloric intake as non-dancers? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the correlation between what we eat and how we perform is a highly useful life skill.
  2. Using spreadsheet programs like Microsoft Excel and charting software programs can provide clear documentation for recording nutrition/performance ratios.
  3. Studying science in relation to dance identifies nutrients needed to develop muscular health.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers who practice proper nutrition generally experience greater longevity in a performing art that places great demands on the body.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate alignment control during warm-up and movement sequences

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate proper modern dance movements in center- and across-the-floor combinations such as centered and off-centered movement; fall and recovery; and swing and suspend. (DOK 1-2)
  2. Articulate the importance of gradually warming up the body by following a sequence of movements that progressively increases in difficulty and works specific muscle groups. (DOK 1-2)
  3. Maintain balanced and aligned posture by being aware of how this is attained (using eyes for visual cues, middle ear for sense of equilibrium, and receptors in joints and muscles). (DOK 1-3)
  4. Physically demonstrate how a well-planned kinesthetic warm maintains dance technique and rigor in performance (DOK 1-3)
  5. Understands and can demonstrate that center/core strength increases body control and thorough range of movement. (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are some architectural structures suspended?
  2. Which is more satisfying: resisting gravity or giving into it?
  3. What is the connection between a strong center and: fall, recovery, swing and suspension?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to respond mindfully to being thrown off center reflects a flexibility of thought that can be applied in any life situation where the unexpected occurs such as maneuvering a crowded sidewalk.
  2. Dancers use body alignment much like vocalists use proper vocal alignment to provide agility and stability.
  3. Video playbacks can be used to assess proper alignment.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers are trained to be immediately responsive to both internal and external stimuli and to make the resultant response meaningful.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate foundational dance forms (ballet, modern, tap, jazz)

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Match dance terminology correctly to movements executed in a variety of dance forms. (DOK 1)
  2. Demonstrate body positions correctly that relate to a variety of dance forms (parallel and turned-out positions, contract, neutral and release) (DOK 1)
  3. Demonstrate traveling movements correctly from a variety of dance forms (DOK 1-2)
  4. Differentiate what style is being demonstrated by the use of a particular technique. (DOK 1)
  5. Understand the benefits of training in more than one style/technique (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is your experience of modern technique different from your experience of ballet?
  2. What is the connection between muscle control and movement execution?
  3. How would you describe the feeling of working on the floor as opposed to working in a vertical plane?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Because most people move in a parallel orientation, technique leads to better body and kinesthetic awareness for pedestrian movement.
  2. An understanding of how the abdominal wall supports the spine improves posture and helps with proper lifting and carrying.
  3. Voice coaches occasionally have singers lie on the floor to experience proper breathing.
  4. Animation software allows students to take still images and imitate them.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers who study the foundational dance forms are highly versatile performers.
  2. Dancers employ artistic investigation to enhance kinesthetic growth, cross training, and muscular balance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Demonstrate value of sequence in a warm-up

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the rationale for sequential warm-up for the demands of a class (DOK 1-3)
  2. Order correctly a series of warm-up movements using proper technique (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What qualifies as a sequence of events in your morning routine at home?
  2. What happens when you perform a warm-up out of sequence?
  3. How is your day impacted when your normal routine is interrupted?
  4. Why is a sequential regimen an important aspect of performing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Most day-to-day activities have an order or progression in which they happen most efficiently.
  2. The examination of how sequence impacts outcome is a skill that applies to any activity or job.
  3. Software is available to readily order and reorder sequences to maximize the action potential.

Nature Of:

  1. Because the body is a dancer's instrument, it is vital that it be treated well for maximum performance and endurance.
  2. Prevention is better than cure in taking care of the body,

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Identify and demonstrate appropriate posture

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply dance posture and carriage in and outside of dance class (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify proper and improper posture and carriage in others (DOK 1-2)
  3. Suggest anatomical adjustments to correct poor posture and carriage (DOK 1-3)
  4. Maintain alignment appropriate to a dance form while performing (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What images can a dancer use to put her/himself into correct alignment?
  2. Why is it necessary to use proper alignment outside of dance class?
  3. How does alignment affect body systems and functions other than those required for dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Proper alignment and carriage is beneficial for a strong and healthy spine and torso.
  2. Many chronic neck, back, hip, and leg complaints are related to poor posture.
  3. Computer keyboarding requires supported posture and correct placement on one's chair.
  4. The self-correction and adjustment of posture develops a heightened sense of self-awareness and body control.

Nature Of:

  1. What often is labeled the good carriage of a dancer is simply proper posture.
  2. It is the nature of dance to take what is sound, accurate physics, and present it as art.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate movement originating from a strong center

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify in writing movement observed relative to "center" (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify orally movement relative to "center," and begin techniques to strengthen the center (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate physically muscular engagement for appropriate posture relative to a strong central center (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate proper body alignment (parallel and turned out positions) in a variety of foundational dance forms (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What impact does center or core have on your ability to dance and execute steps?
  2. Why is it important to be able to articulate our understanding of "center" through the written and spoken word?
  3. What are some of the non-dance movements you perform that are more efficient because you move from your center?
  4. When would a person not want to move from center? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The knowledge of how to move from the center is fundamental to functional wellness.
  2. The use of words to explain kinesthetic concepts can make those concepts more accessible to verbal and language learners.
  3. The concept of center can be compared to principles of physics, wherein weak cores result in structural collapses. For example, buildings with weak architecture collapse during earthquakes.
  4. Technological networks function properly only if the hubs or routers function properly.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers in all genres understand that the core is what grounds even the freest of dance movement.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Perform a basic dance warm-up

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Memorize and participate in a prescribed warm-up (DOK 1)
  2. Correlate the correct warm up to specific movement (DOK 1-2)
  3. Independently select the appropriate warm-up for any situation (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate flexibility and placement in a warm-up (DOK 1-2)
  5. Refine body control, and develop technique skill through a warm-up (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the difference between warm-up and technique?
  2. Is there a correlation between warm-up and other areas of life?
  3. How can warming up properly affect technique?

Relevance & Application:

  1. To warm up the voice before singing and the fingers before playing piano, and to practice before giving a presentation are all similar examples of the valuable concept of "warm up."
  2. All endeavors benefit from advanced preparation and the ability to strategize.
  3. An understanding that warming up is an essential component of a performance demonstrates a dancer's understanding of muscular and joint-action and response.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers recognize that their bodies are their artistic instrument.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Make appropriate nutritional choices for dance performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify foods and liquids that support dance wellness and enhance performance (DOK 1-2)
  2. Correlate the benefits of sound, nutritional choices to dance performance (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which foods are considered nutritional foods?
  2. How can eating nutritious foods positively or negatively affect one's ability to dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Like dancers, racecars require proper fuel.
  2. An understanding of nutrition and performance enhances general knowledge of body chemistry.
  3. Water functions as a delivery system and is very important for hydration, particularly during physical activity, and contributes to good health.
  4. Internet resources provide excellent sources for wellness and physical performance studies.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers require adequate energy intake to fully reach their capacity as movers.
  2. Dancers are athletes and must care for their bodies in a similar manner.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Move with intent while developing technique

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify by name the major bones and muscles in movement, including the spine, pelvis, knees, feet, and abdominals (DOK 1-2)
  2. Participate in simple warm-ups and stretching before and after dancing (DOK 1)
  3. Demonstrate basic control and flexibility in practice and performance (DOK 1-2)
  4. Articulate the importance of posture and facial expression when communicating an idea in performance (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate coordinated movements incorporating head, shoulders, arms, and legs (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can warming up and stretching affect dancing?
  2. How do your muscles control your movements?
  3. How does control over my body make me more confident?
  4. How can improved technique enhance a performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Dancers use their knowledge of body function and structure to develop proper technique.
  2. The sequential and precise warm-up dancers use to prepare for performance helps them to organize and maintain structure in everyday life.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers pursue higher levels of technical proficiency to develop deeper artistic expression.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform movement phrases alone and with others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate control, coordination, balance, and elevation in the basic actions of travel, gesture, bend, turn, jump, stillness, and transference of weight (DOK 1)
  2. Perform movement sequences alone and with others (leading-following, copying-mirroring, unison-canon, and meeting-parting); and use traveling patterns in space and time (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate good posture and basic joint actions (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate focus and concentration while moving (DOK 1-2)
  5. Develop a one-part movement phrase with a beginning, middle, and an end (DOK 1-3)
  6. Demonstrate a basic sense of rhythm in performance (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is body awareness?
  2. How do you move with rhythm changes?
  3. What kind of body shapes do you see in others' dance?
  4. How does the change in rhythm affect the way you feel?
  5. How can you identify the levels and directions that you see in others' dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Developing proper body control and posture leads to lifelong wellness.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers perform and appreciate dance in multiple ways.