New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Dance - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Extended Pathway
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Refine the creative process in dance-making

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create dance studies using different choreographic forms such as AB, ABA, rondo, chance, or narrative (DOK 3-4)
  2. Develop a full dance work using both literal and abstract methods (DOK 3-4)
  3. Refine and edit the movements of two dances in contrasting styles (DOK 1-3)
  4. Refine in-process drafts into polished products (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is it different to create a dance for a solo compared to a dance for an ensemble piece?
  2. How would you explain the meaning of an abstract dance piece?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Use of video and audio technology in dance creation gives insight to specific details needed to refine a performance.
  2. Comparison of the creative process in all art forms helps one to investigate how auditory and visual repetitions, contrasts, and unity make the artwork coherent.
  3. Use of dance-based software programs creates dance movement.
  4. Performance with concentration and commitment communicates meaning and builds self-esteem and confidence.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers analyze existing work and use existing knowledge to create new works.
  2. Dancers use critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, and process systems to create dance and make dance works.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Utilize choreographic components when creating dance works

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Skillfully use the elements of dance to create new work (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use and manipulate form to create multiple dances (DOK 2-4)
  3. Articulate the significance of transitions in dance creations that bring balance, harmony, and proportion to the work (DOK 1-3)
  4. Use formal structures in professional dances to inspire a composition (DOK 1-4)
  5. Develop an artistic perspective in dance-making (DOK 1-4)
  6. Perform with concentration and commitment to communicate meaning (DOK 1-4)
  7. Create a dance using components of choreography (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does learning to perform phrases from the masterwork help one to comprehend the full, expressive power of that movement?
  2. How do you know what a dance is really about?
  3. How does one use and change specific choreographic forms to create two or more dances?
  4. How does a dancer use changes in space, time, and energy to compose a dance?
  5. How much can you change a dance before it becomes another dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Digital media helps to show how choreography is aesthetically driven.
  2. Connections for kinesthetic learners come from relating dance sequence to the sequencing in math, science, arts, and language arts.
  3. Material culture can influence decision-making in the choreographic process.

Nature Of:

  1. There are many dynamics within the components of choreography.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Fundamental Pathway
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Utilize the principles and practices of choreography to create dance works

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create, repeat, and perform dance works that demonstrate an effective use of dance elements; have a beginning, middle, and an end; and use compositional forms such a theme, variation, canon, and call and response (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use the elements of dance (space, time, and energy) to create a dance (DOK 1-3)
  3. Apply improvisation, experimentation, use of various stimuli, and manipulation tools to integrate with the choreographic process (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do choreographers use space, time, and energy to compose dance?
  2. How can the principles and practices of choreography be adapted based on needs and intent?
  3. What effect do stimuli have on the selection of principles and practices when creating dance works?
  4. How do other cultures create dance works?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The use of principles of choreography to effectively communicate ideas gives a choreographer many options when creating dance works.
  2. Digital technology can be used to manipulate changes in principles and practices to give many options when creating dance works.
  3. Comparison of the benefits of the principles and practices of dance with the elements and principles of design in visual art gives insight into the creative process and the tools artists use.

Nature Of:

  1. The principles and practices of choreography are the glue within the creative process.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Correlation between choreographic intent and choreographic product

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Understand the relevance of form in the creative process (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use choreographic principles, processes, and structures to create dance works based on intent (DOK 3-4)
  3. Understand dance as a way to create and communicate meaning (DOK 1-2)
  4. Articulate and explain intention consistently by using critical and creative thinking skills (DOK 2-3)
  5. Manipulate the time, space, or energy of a given phrase based on a theme or intent (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How would the choreographic intent change if you performed the movements in reverse order?
  2. How do you explain the intent of your dance in relation to the movements you have chosen?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Engineers can create based on a design idea for which they "choreograph" each step of building or bridge until they reach an end or accomplish the intent.
  2. Laptops with styli allow for quick notation when reviewing for consistency in intent.
  3. Writers rely on thematic elements as a means to develop intent.

Nature Of:

  1. All communities create their own set improvisation, which can end in a meaningful repetition or choreographed system of events and patterns.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Create abstract movement using imagery

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create abstract phrasing based on shape (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create abstract phrasing based on a single idea or form (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explore imagery that is concrete and specific in concept but abstract in movement (DOK 1-3)
  4. Design abstract expressive movement (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When is a dance considered "abstract?"
  2. How can a simple phrase be changed to create a less predictable outcome?
  3. Why are some abstract depictions considered odd or difficult for an audience to understand?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Many art disciplines rely on abstract interpretation to communicate an idea.
  2. Movement contains a distinct shape and can be used to help the viewer to visualize meaning.
  3. The use of theme variations in music is a similar process to creating abstract movement in dance.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers create abstract forms of personal expression.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Choreographic intent involves making intentional movement choices

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Add design and structure to movement choreography to support intent (DOK 1-4)
  2. Delete movement from choreography to support intent (DOK 1-4)
  3. Manipulate or augment existing choreographed movement to support intent (DOK 1-4)
  4. Demonstrate expressive responses to a range of contrasting music, non-musical sounds, and silence through improvisation (DOK 2-3)
  5. Observe personal work and the work of others, and articulate to what extent and in what ways the choreography has been communicated to express intent (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can you make an existing piece of choreography more interesting?
  2. Is it reasonable to change your theme because you like a certain movement? Is that the same as changing a movement to fit a theme?
  3. How does the intent of a dance change when the music is changed, even if the movement remains the same?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Sticking to a chosen course is sometimes beneficial and sometimes harmful. Learning to discern the difference can be life altering.
  2. Studying video of various dance sequences can inspire ideas to incorporate into an improvised or original dance work.
  3. Changing the variables constantly, researchers work toward solutions.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers adapt to ever-changing situations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Effective and appropriate use of dance elements (space, time, and energy) in the creative process

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create a composition based solely on one of the elements of dance (space, time, or energy) (DOK 3-4)
  2. Use multiple elements such as time and space, or space and energy when creating a dance (DOK 3-4)
  3. Create a composition using contrasting levels or relationships and a full range of organic shapes such as symmetry and asymmetry in space or time, or differences between two- and three-dimensional space (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to diversify the use of choreographic elements?
  2. What examples have you seen of a combination of elements in nature?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Utilizing the choreographic principles when creating a dance work provides a contextual basis much like a setting provides context in literature.
  2. Using video playbacks, dancers can assess their ability to employ the choreographic elements.
  3. Understanding the relationship among space, time, and energy helps scientists to develop feasible hypotheses.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers know that the choreographic elements connect structure with meaning.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Group dynamics have distinctive choreographic characteristics

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create solo, duet, and group combinations (DOK 2-4)
  2. Integrate world dance choreography into a solo, duet, or group work (DOK 2-3)
  3. Demonstrate basic partnering techniques with transitional flow (DOK 1-2)
  4. Improvise ways to support oneself and a dance partner (DOK 2-3)
  5. Work with others to extend movement options, including mobility and stability (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is a dance space different when working with only one body versus groups?
  2. When is unison satisfying, and when is it oversimplifying?
  3. What makes an ensemble effective?

Relevance & Application:

  1. As a workplace supervisor, one must understand how to effectively facilitate collaboration among groups of people, and motivate individuals to do their best work.
  2. The ability to take vocabulary from one culture and use it in another requires and deepens understandings of both cultures.
  3. Shared, online workspaces create opportunities for people to share ideas and create an outcome that truly is collaborative.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers know that juxtapositions and amalgamations offer excellent opportunities for creative solutions to a dance problem.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Articulate creative choices required to develop choreographic intent

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize and articulate the creative choices made in choreography (DOK 1-4)
  2. Select movements that serve the intent through improvisation, experimentation, and exploration, (DOK 1-4)
  3. Organize and design sequences that reflect intent and meaning (DOK 1-4)
  4. Create and develop movement motifs to produce dance studies (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Did the architect of the Leaning Tower of Pisa intend for the bell tower to be straight? Why does it fascinate so many people, and draw in thousands of tourists?
  2. Does art happen by mistake?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Humans create organized structures of communication in order to function without chaos.
  2. Modern technology allows dancers and choreographers to review work in order to highlight specifics that support or undermine message or vision.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers create dances through a process of trial and error that requires the ability and discipline to self-analyze and self-correct.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate basic composition skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create, repeat, and perform dance studies that demonstrate effective use of space, time, energy, dynamics, body shapes, and rhythm and that have a beginning, middle development, and an ending (DOK 2-3)
  2. Vary movement size (DOK 1-2)
  3. Vary movement tempo (DOK 1-2)
  4. Vary movement force, energy, and flow (DOK 1-2)
  5. Vary meter, rhythm, and accents (DOK 1-2)
  6. Use basic composition to create a dance study (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What examples or comparisons can you give that relate to space, time, and energy in your school environment?
  2. What specifically is a dynamic in your school?
  3. What specifically is a dynamic in your personality?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Traffic congestion such as in halls or roads and accidents occur when individuals do not know how to properly respond to changes in space, time, or energy.
  2. We move differently when we have more or less of any element such as space, time, or energy.
  3. Computations that once required entire rooms of hardware now can be met and exceeded on devices smaller than a lighter.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers have a strong sense of musicality.
  2. Dancers can modify movement for any performance space.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Movement phrases are developed based on both existing knowledge and new discoveries

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create a phrase of varied lengths (DOK 2-3)
  2. Manipulate personal phrase (DOK 1-3)
  3. Manipulate another's phrase (DOK 1-3)
  4. Integrate traditional world dance steps into an original movement phrase (DOK 2-3)
  5. Discover new patterns using design such as repetition, variety, and contrast and structure such as AB, ABA, theme, and variation (DOK 1-3)
  6. Select movements that communicate the meaning and intent (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it more interesting and satisfying to manipulate your own phrase or someone else's? Why?
  2. What are some of your frustrations in watching others execute your movement?
  3. What are some of the surprises or thrills in watching others execute your movement?
  4. What have you learned about yourself as a teacher? As a learner?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Working with others teaches us as much about ourselves as it does about others.
  2. Collaborating successfully in any situation requires the ability to respectfully integrate the appropriate thoughts and ideas of all those participating.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers are dependent on the ability of others to create a shared vision.
  2. The ability to integrate the traditional with the new is what keeps dance vital.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create group dances

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create various group shapes and spatial settings (DOK 1-2)
  2. Create a dance by using group shapes and spatial settings (DOK 3-4)
  3. Evaluate a dance in terms of balance and proportion (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you give form to group shapes in space and time?
  2. Do the chosen movements project the intent?
  3. How do you know you are finished?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When we work with others, we learn as much about ourselves as we do about others.
  2. Shared inquiry builds an appreciation of diverse opinions and styles.
  3. Dance form and design parallel the structure in creative writing.
  4. A strong understanding of mathematical concepts such as numeracy and geometry are used when developing dance studies.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing dances are forms of self-expression and convey the choreographer's intent.
  2. Dance reinvents itself with new works at every opportunity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Create a dance incorporating compositional elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create movement phrases using each one of the compositional elements (DOK 1-2)
  2. Consider the aesthetic quality of the design when composing (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you begin to create a new phrase of movement?
  2. How do the elements of dance make sense of a dance?
  3. How do you know when you are finished?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When we work with others, we learn as much about ourselves as we do about others.
  2. A thinking body is a personal instrument of expression.
  3. Video playbacks aid in determining effective use of space, time, and energy and help to assess the aesthetic qualities of a dance work.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing dances are forms of self-expression and convey the choreographer's intent.
  2. Dance is composed of original expressive movement in time and space, not imitated steps from traditional dance styles.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create simple group dances

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create a phrase for two dancers (DOK 2-3)
  2. Repeat, develop, and vary the phrase (DOK 1-3)
  3. Share work in progress for feedback to improve (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What skills are required to make a short dance study?
  2. How does composing help you to create and solve problems?
  3. How do the rules of composition help you to make dances?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Motifs in dance works can mirror a story, history, or musical motif and can create a seamless connection to these disciplines.
  2. Digital and visual stimuli can be used to provide ideas and inform decisions in the dance-making process.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing dances are forms of self-expression and convey the choreographer's intent.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Create a short dance using compositional elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use both stillness and motion as expressive tools (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use timing to make entrances and exits (DOK 1-2)
  3. Use forms such as AB, ABA, and call and response to structure dance (DOK 1-3)
  4. Edit and refine a dance to clarify the intent (DOK 1-4)
  5. Perform for an audience (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What rules do you use to create dances?
  2. What do you do to structure a dance?
  3. How does making a dance help you to solve problems?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Selecting and using specific criteria in making judgments about the quality of a dance provides foundational understanding of problem solving and critique used in literature, music, theatre, and visual art.
  2. Viewing and responding to existing and improvised dance works enhances the importance of dance participation as well as dance patrons.
  3. Compositional elements in dance can be seen as foundational building blocks for movement much as root words are foundational in literature which provides an understanding of basic structures in everyday life.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing dances are forms of self-expression and convey the choreographer's intent.
  2. Dance is composed of original expressive movement in time and space, not imitated steps from traditional dance styles.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Design a group dance study using the elements of dance (space, time, and energy)

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify how body positions such as upright, off-center, and curved can communicate feelings and ideas (DOK 1-3)
  2. Respond to a variety of motivational stimuli in movement to communicate ideas in solo, duet, and group formations (DOK 1-3)
  3. Use the dance elements to solve a movement problem (DOK 1-3)
  4. Experiment with elements of composition (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to design a dance?
  2. What is the difference between exploring movement and making dance?
  3. How do my chosen movements project my meaning?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to respond to a variety of stimuli builds a multi-sensory awareness of the world and builds skills in multi-sensory processing such as processing messages utilizing simultaneous music and visual images found in television and film, processing a message being delivered by a public speaker in a large crowd etc.
  2. Applying dance elements to solve a movement problem mirrors applying variables in an experiment to solve a scientific problem, adjusting elements of color and texture to solve a visual arts problem or applying various numeric possibilities to solve a mathematics problem.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing are forms of self-expression and convey the choreographer's intent.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Create a short dance using compositional principles (form/structure and design)

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise phrases that express feeling, moods, and ideas inspired by stimuli, including animals, nature sounds, action words, rhythms, objects, and silence (DOK 2-3)
  2. Use repetition and variation with space, time, and energy (DOK 1-2)
  3. Select phrases and link them in order to compose a short dance. (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can a movement phrase tell a story?
  2. What elements are used to create dances?
  3. What does movement mean?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using improvisation to explore ways to communicate without words sets a foundational understanding of the notion of "body language" and the subtleties in expression a movement can provide.
  2. Connecting dance phrases to build a short dance provides a kinesthetic link to taking short phrases in literature and connecting them to build a paragraph thus connecting a concrete structure to a more abstract structure.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing are forms of self-expression and convey the choreographer's intent.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create a dance work alone and with others, and incorporate a movement motif

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise a movement phrase alone and with a partner, and select a movement starting point (DOK 1-3)
  2. Select movement for the phrase that has meaning and relevance to the idea or stimuli (DOK 1-3)
  3. Observe and refine a movement phrase utilizing knowledge of the dance elements (space, time and energy), and incorporate contrast, variety, climax, and relationships (DOK 1-4)
  4. Develop a sense of sequence (DOK 1-3)
  5. Translate basic written word compositions into movement (DOK 1-3)
  6. Reflect upon one's own work, and make suggestions for improvements (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What kinds of inspiration can you use to create dances?
  2. How can the dance elements improve a movement phrase?
  3. Is it necessary to have a pattern in a movement phrase?
  4. Do the sounds have patterns?
  5. How do you know a dance is finished?
  6. How can one movement phrase tell a better story than another movement phrase?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using improvisation to explore ways to communicate without words sets a foundational understanding of the notion of "body language" and the subtleties in expression a movement can provide.
  2. Connecting dance phrases to build a short dance provides a kinesthetic link to taking short phrases in literature and connecting them to build a paragraph thus connecting a concrete structure to a more abstract structure.

Nature Of:

  1. Variety and contrast in the pattern make dance interesting.
  2. "Preformed movement patterns such as 'steps,' 'routines,' or 'combinations? are not used. Rather, significant movement sequences are drawn out of human experience and the very act of moving." ~Lois Ellfeldt

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Use the dance elements to create a simple movement phrase based on personal ideas and concepts from other sources

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create a simple movement phrase that has a beginning, middle, and an end during instructor-lead exercise (DOK 2-3)
  2. Experiment with tempo and timing changes. Walk and move on a beat in various ways such as moving for four beats and stopping for seven beats (DOK 1-2)
  3. Create shapes that relate to nature or an idea, and develop them into a simple phrase of movement, learning to compose a "one-part" phrase (beginning, middle, and end) (DOK 1-3)
  4. Create a short movement phrase to express feelings (DOK 2-4)
  5. Use movement symbols to create a movement phrase during instructor-lead exercise (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Where do movement ideas come from?
  2. What does it mean to dance on beat?
  3. How does the movement of a particular dance make you feel?
  4. Why do some movements look better than others?
  5. Can you see the sounds in the movement of a particular dance?
  6. Does the movement pattern of a particular dance make sense?
  7. Does your dance have a beginning, middle, and an ending?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Promoting thinking through movements of the body demonstrates the body as a personal instrument of expression and ways to communicate without words.
  2. Connecting a simple dance phrase to a simple sentence provides a multi-modality approach to basic sentence structure.
  3. Awareness of similar patterns that happen in writing, reading, and moving pictures provides an understanding that people communicate in many ways.

Nature Of:

  1. Dance is a language of expression.
  2. Dance communicates ideas and stories.
  3. Dance is the human body moving in time and space - expressive movement.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Create a solo dance with changes in space or timing to reflect different feelings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use action words, everyday sounds, and musical instruments to create movements (DOK 1-2)
  2. Learn to improvise within a structure (DOK 2-3)
  3. Explore and learn the concept of variety by using the dance elements (space, time and energy), and incorporate changes of level, space, body part, direction, shaping, and timing to create a phrase of movement (DOK 1-2)
  4. Choose movements that feel right and can define the moment (DOK 1-3)
  5. Select and organize movements to create a "one-part" phrase (beginning, middle, and end) that promotes the theme or idea (DOK 1-4)
  6. Use repetition to create simple movement phrases (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What should you do with movement?
  2. What does movement tell you?
  3. What do you like about the movement of a particular dance?
  4. What shapes and actions help you to understand the story, feelings, and idea?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Connecting the use of space in time in everyday objects builds a foundational understanding of basic everyday elements such as trees can be large and expansive and fill much of the space around it or they can be quite small and fragile, this promotes a foundational awareness of the environment in which we live, work and play.
  2. Exploration of movement and sound connects the senses of see, hear and feel together to show how bodies react to various surroundings.

Nature Of:

  1. Moving patterns change in time and space.
  2. Movement phrases are drawn from human experience and the very act of moving.