New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

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Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate alignment control during warm-up and movement sequences

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate proper modern dance movements in center- and across-the-floor combinations such as centered and off-centered movement; fall and recovery; and swing and suspend. (DOK 1-2)
  2. Articulate the importance of gradually warming up the body by following a sequence of movements that progressively increases in difficulty and works specific muscle groups. (DOK 1-2)
  3. Maintain balanced and aligned posture by being aware of how this is attained (using eyes for visual cues, middle ear for sense of equilibrium, and receptors in joints and muscles). (DOK 1-3)
  4. Physically demonstrate how a well-planned kinesthetic warm maintains dance technique and rigor in performance (DOK 1-3)
  5. Understands and can demonstrate that center/core strength increases body control and thorough range of movement. (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are some architectural structures suspended?
  2. Which is more satisfying: resisting gravity or giving into it?
  3. What is the connection between a strong center and: fall, recovery, swing and suspension?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to respond mindfully to being thrown off center reflects a flexibility of thought that can be applied in any life situation where the unexpected occurs such as maneuvering a crowded sidewalk.
  2. Dancers use body alignment much like vocalists use proper vocal alignment to provide agility and stability.
  3. Video playbacks can be used to assess proper alignment.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers are trained to be immediately responsive to both internal and external stimuli and to make the resultant response meaningful.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate performance skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Memorize prescribed choreographic work in an informal setting (DOK 1)
  2. Perform a prescribed choreographic work in a formal setting (DOK 1-2)
  3. Respond to directions by the choreographer, and implement corrective action (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What jobs or careers involve public performances?
  2. What is the difference between dancing in class and dancing in a production?
  3. How is memorized choreography different from improvisation?
  4. Why is the work of some choreographers easier to perform than the work of others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Rehearsals require a different focus and application of skills from skills applied in dance production situations.
  2. To videotape and critique one's performance in practice situations improves real-world applications.
  3. The performance of the basic structures of choreographed works develops confidence to take risks.
  4. Performance skills develop a dancer's self-direction and problem-solving abilities.

Nature Of:

  1. It is the goal of dance performance to impart meaning and elevate awareness.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Identify and demonstrate appropriate posture

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply dance posture and carriage in and outside of dance class (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify proper and improper posture and carriage in others (DOK 1-2)
  3. Suggest anatomical adjustments to correct poor posture and carriage (DOK 1-3)
  4. Maintain alignment appropriate to a dance form while performing (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What images can a dancer use to put her/himself into correct alignment?
  2. Why is it necessary to use proper alignment outside of dance class?
  3. How does alignment affect body systems and functions other than those required for dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Proper alignment and carriage is beneficial for a strong and healthy spine and torso.
  2. Many chronic neck, back, hip, and leg complaints are related to poor posture.
  3. Computer keyboarding requires supported posture and correct placement on one's chair.
  4. The self-correction and adjustment of posture develops a heightened sense of self-awareness and body control.

Nature Of:

  1. What often is labeled the good carriage of a dancer is simply proper posture.
  2. It is the nature of dance to take what is sound, accurate physics, and present it as art.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement, Technique, and Performance

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate movement originating from a strong center

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify in writing movement observed relative to "center" (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify orally movement relative to "center," and begin techniques to strengthen the center (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate physically muscular engagement for appropriate posture relative to a strong central center (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate proper body alignment (parallel and turned out positions) in a variety of foundational dance forms (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What impact does center or core have on your ability to dance and execute steps?
  2. Why is it important to be able to articulate our understanding of "center" through the written and spoken word?
  3. What are some of the non-dance movements you perform that are more efficient because you move from your center?
  4. When would a person not want to move from center? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The knowledge of how to move from the center is fundamental to functional wellness.
  2. The use of words to explain kinesthetic concepts can make those concepts more accessible to verbal and language learners.
  3. The concept of center can be compared to principles of physics, wherein weak cores result in structural collapses. For example, buildings with weak architecture collapse during earthquakes.
  4. Technological networks function properly only if the hubs or routers function properly.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers in all genres understand that the core is what grounds even the freest of dance movement.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Perform a basic dance warm-up

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Memorize and participate in a prescribed warm-up (DOK 1)
  2. Correlate the correct warm up to specific movement (DOK 1-2)
  3. Independently select the appropriate warm-up for any situation (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate flexibility and placement in a warm-up (DOK 1-2)
  5. Refine body control, and develop technique skill through a warm-up (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the difference between warm-up and technique?
  2. Is there a correlation between warm-up and other areas of life?
  3. How can warming up properly affect technique?

Relevance & Application:

  1. To warm up the voice before singing and the fingers before playing piano, and to practice before giving a presentation are all similar examples of the valuable concept of "warm up."
  2. All endeavors benefit from advanced preparation and the ability to strategize.
  3. An understanding that warming up is an essential component of a performance demonstrates a dancer's understanding of muscular and joint-action and response.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers recognize that their bodies are their artistic instrument.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Make appropriate nutritional choices for dance performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify foods and liquids that support dance wellness and enhance performance (DOK 1-2)
  2. Correlate the benefits of sound, nutritional choices to dance performance (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which foods are considered nutritional foods?
  2. How can eating nutritious foods positively or negatively affect one's ability to dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Like dancers, racecars require proper fuel.
  2. An understanding of nutrition and performance enhances general knowledge of body chemistry.
  3. Water functions as a delivery system and is very important for hydration, particularly during physical activity, and contributes to good health.
  4. Internet resources provide excellent sources for wellness and physical performance studies.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers require adequate energy intake to fully reach their capacity as movers.
  2. Dancers are athletes and must care for their bodies in a similar manner.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Extended Pathway
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Refine the creative process in dance-making

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create dance studies using different choreographic forms such as AB, ABA, rondo, chance, or narrative (DOK 3-4)
  2. Develop a full dance work using both literal and abstract methods (DOK 3-4)
  3. Refine and edit the movements of two dances in contrasting styles (DOK 1-3)
  4. Refine in-process drafts into polished products (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is it different to create a dance for a solo compared to a dance for an ensemble piece?
  2. How would you explain the meaning of an abstract dance piece?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Use of video and audio technology in dance creation gives insight to specific details needed to refine a performance.
  2. Comparison of the creative process in all art forms helps one to investigate how auditory and visual repetitions, contrasts, and unity make the artwork coherent.
  3. Use of dance-based software programs creates dance movement.
  4. Performance with concentration and commitment communicates meaning and builds self-esteem and confidence.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers analyze existing work and use existing knowledge to create new works.
  2. Dancers use critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, and process systems to create dance and make dance works.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Compose dance works that convey meaning and intent

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Select intent or stimuli to create a solo dance and an ensemble dance (DOK 1-3)
  2. Define the meaning, intent or stimuli of solo and ensemble dance works (DOK 1-4)
  3. Create dance works using different choreographic forms such as AB, ABA, rondo, chance, or narrative (DOK 3-4)
  4. Compose dances inspired by or based on a particular movement or musical style (DOK 3-4)
  5. Develop an artistic perspective in dance-making (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one use a stimulus to create and develop a dance work?
  2. How does one make a dance movement abstract?
  3. How would one compare his or her use of a stimulus or intent in two different dances?
  4. How does one explain his or her use of a stimulus or intent in an abstract dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Choreography and movement sequences are used to abstractly interpret complex and simple concepts.
  2. Insight into the deeper meaning and intent within a dance work comes from providing justification for the use of stimuli.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers and choreographers reinterpret the world around them, and translate it into physical movement.
  2. Dancers and choreographers can offer new insights or perspectives to their audiences by working with different intents and stimuli.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Choreographic intent involves making intentional movement choices

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Add design and structure to movement choreography to support intent (DOK 1-4)
  2. Delete movement from choreography to support intent (DOK 1-4)
  3. Manipulate or augment existing choreographed movement to support intent (DOK 1-4)
  4. Demonstrate expressive responses to a range of contrasting music, non-musical sounds, and silence through improvisation (DOK 2-3)
  5. Observe personal work and the work of others, and articulate to what extent and in what ways the choreography has been communicated to express intent (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can you make an existing piece of choreography more interesting?
  2. Is it reasonable to change your theme because you like a certain movement? Is that the same as changing a movement to fit a theme?
  3. How does the intent of a dance change when the music is changed, even if the movement remains the same?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Sticking to a chosen course is sometimes beneficial and sometimes harmful. Learning to discern the difference can be life altering.
  2. Studying video of various dance sequences can inspire ideas to incorporate into an improvised or original dance work.
  3. Changing the variables constantly, researchers work toward solutions.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers adapt to ever-changing situations.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Create, Compose and Choreograph

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Articulate creative choices required to develop choreographic intent

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize and articulate the creative choices made in choreography (DOK 1-4)
  2. Select movements that serve the intent through improvisation, experimentation, and exploration, (DOK 1-4)
  3. Organize and design sequences that reflect intent and meaning (DOK 1-4)
  4. Create and develop movement motifs to produce dance studies (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Did the architect of the Leaning Tower of Pisa intend for the bell tower to be straight? Why does it fascinate so many people, and draw in thousands of tourists?
  2. Does art happen by mistake?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Humans create organized structures of communication in order to function without chaos.
  2. Modern technology allows dancers and choreographers to review work in order to highlight specifics that support or undermine message or vision.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers create dances through a process of trial and error that requires the ability and discipline to self-analyze and self-correct.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 3. Historical and Cultural Context

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Historical dance figures represent the era and society in which they lived and worked

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Articulate the importance of dance through history and its ability to communicate across cultures (DOK 1-2)
  2. Understand the impact of notable dancers in history (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe the important contributions of different choreographers in selected dance styles and cultures (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate the role of dance patrons and impresarios as art through history (DOK 1-2)
  5. Use appropriate research techniques to study historical dance figures (DOK 1-3)
  6. Discuss the relationship between the social and political environment of historical dance figures and how these factors contributed to their work (DOK 2-3)
  7. Draw correlations between what is researched and what is learned in dance class (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What qualifies a dancer or choreographer as historical?
  2. What contributions have historical dance figures had on the development of dance and dance styles?
  3. How is the work of historical dance figures relevant today?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Current societal issues are common themes in artistic presentations.
  2. Technological resources give access to research journals, primary sources, and dance literature that provide in-depth research on historical dance figures.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers reflect their world through movement.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Historical and Cultural Context

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. The values of a culture are reflected in their dances

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Examine the human need to communicate individual ideas through movement and dance (DOK 1-3)
  2. Recognize dances from around the world that communicate something unique about specific cultures (DOK 1-2)
  3. Understand the impact of culture and geographic origins on the characteristics, costumes, and styles of dances (DOK 1-3)
  4. Discuss the unique elements of selected world dance forms (DOK 1-2)
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of world dance forms through performance (DOK 1)
  6. Improvise identified world dance forms utilizing their unique elements (DOK 2-3)
  7. Discuss how dance styles influence each other across cultures (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. To what extent do costumes determine how dancers move? How is this related to what they are trying to convey as a culture?
  2. How would youth from other cultures learn our dances?

Relevance & Application:

  1. People express through their dances what they value as a culture.
  2. In the same way that "walking in another's shoes" builds sensitivity, putting another's movements into one's own body builds empathy.
  3. Digital media allow us to experience authentic performances from a variety of world cultures.

Nature Of:

  1. Dance communicates both global and personal perspectives.
  2. Dance reflects a common goal, effort, and communal spirit.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 3. Historical and Cultural Context

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Culture and geography are reflected in the traditional dance heritage of a people

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the origins of selected dances throughout history, and trace their development and evolution through time (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe dance forms that developed along with musical forms (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate basic skills in the replication of a series of traditional steps (DOK 1)
  4. Demonstrate stylistic and technical differences between cultures (DOK 1-2)
  5. Speak to orally or in writing distinctions in cultural contexts (DOK 1-2)
  6. Research selected cultural dances (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do cultural forms reflect current trends in dance?
  2. How does learning about another culture inform your perception of your own?
  3. How does understanding a culture make learning a dance more meaningful?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Concepts in science require memorization and an understanding of traditional processes in order to comprehend how interactions work.
  2. Theatre productions use traditional costumes, music, and movement to convey a sense of time and place.
  3. Software for databases, word processing, and spreadsheets require one to learn traditional industry standards of practice.
  4. Geography impacts how traditional dances are created.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers value traditional and cultural dance forms, which serve as the foundation for new and cutting-edge choreography.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Extended Pathway
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Apply critical analysis to new dance works, reconstructions, and masterpieces

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze and critique personal and professional or historic works (DOK 1-4)
  2. Compare dances from multiple styles, world traditions, and forms (DOK 2-3)
  3. Journal the creative process of the development of one dance work (DOK 1-4)
  4. Use dance notation and diagrams to reconstruct simple dances (DOK 1-2)
  5. Use aesthetic reflection to refine works and to contemplate issues related to dance as art (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. From which perspective (performer, critic, historian, anthropologist, or choreographer) does one view a particular dance, and why?
  2. How does one interpret an artwork based on stylistic and cultural issues?
  3. How does context affect a dance work?
  4. To what extent is a dance work dependent upon the performer's point of view?
  5. To what extent is a dance work dependent upon the viewer's point of view?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The practice of responding to the work of others and being able to critique one's own work helps us to develop our own value set.
  2. The opinion of entertainment and literary critics is valued only when the critic exhibits depth of knowledge and demonstrates expertise in the topic he or she reviews.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers constantly respond to, reflect upon, and analyze the relevance and significance of their own work and the work of others.
  2. Dancers consider how to improve their own skills through self-reflection and critical analysis with others.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Fundamental Pathway
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Respond to, reflect upon, and analyze new dance works, reconstructions, and masterpieces

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze and critique one dance work (DOK 1-4)
  2. Notate one dance phrase along with one diagram (DOK 1-3)
  3. Use technology to aid in researching and understanding all aspects of dance (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does dance evoke an emotional response in a viewer?
  2. What is a personal interpretation of the creative process?
  3. How could one diagram a dance to explain movement to another person?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Demonstrating knowledge of a subject or situation provides credibility to one's critique or review.
  2. Notation software can be utilized to capture movement in a written form.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers constantly respond to, reflect upon, and analyze the relevance and significance of their own work and the work of others.
  2. Dancers review documentation to consider how to improve their own skills through self-reflection and critical analysis with others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Articulate connections in dance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Transform a concept from another discipline into a movement phrase (DOK 2-3)
  2. Create a short dance based on a series of concepts from another academic content area (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the connection between dance and science?
  2. What is the connection between dance and the humanities?
  3. What ideas can be used from other academic content areas to inspire dance or create dance?
  4. How is dance a "universal language?"
  5. What are ways that dancers use connections to make informed choices?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using inspiration from the world around us as stimuli for creating work creates connections.
  2. Using reactions to other disciplines as inspiration for dance work (and vice versa) provides ways to use dance to inspire or change the world around us.
  3. Describing one similarity between dance and the sciences or humanities sparks awareness of the interdisciplinary connections to dance.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers have great sensitivity to the details of the world. They relate issues, events, and daily occurrences to physical movement.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Communicate choreography through written, oral, and practical applications

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Communicate choreography through the use of dance vocabulary to describe movement (DOK 1)
  2. Use proper anatomical terms related to dance movements to describe the body and body parts (DOK 1)
  3. Use proper kinesiology terms to describe body movement (DOK 1)
  4. Use dance notation to document a dance phrase from a social, historical, or famous dance work (DOK 1-2)
  5. Create notation for an original phrase (DOK 1-3)
  6. Use emotional and expressive language to describe a performance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What could be considered a "universal" language?
  2. How do other art forms document or preserve their work?
  3. Should you use personal opinion when critiquing a dance work? Why, why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Every discipline has its own language, and dance is no exception. For example, in math one learns the meaning and application of fractions. In dance one learns the meaning and application of body alignment.
  2. Software programs that computerize notation aid in long-term dance preservation.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers understand that to preserve a dance, it must be documented in writing and through the use of technology.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Formal analysis and critique protocols

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify, describe, compare, and contrast selected dance styles and genres (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use dance language to describe specific aesthetic differences and similarities among styles and artists (DOK 1-2)
  3. Assess and evaluate a composition created by others relative to its effectiveness and what it communicates (DOK 1-4)
  4. Design, implement, and support personal expectations for evaluating a performance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the connection between learning steps and conveying meaning?
  2. Which is more difficult - finding commonalities or finding differences? Why?
  3. Do different dance styles require different critique criteria?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Attorneys must use factual supporting evidence to persuade a jury.
  2. One's own biases can influence our perception of intent and quality of a piece of choreography.
  3. Dance-focused websites provide archives of dance reviews and resources.
  4. Book reviews for English classes rely on established review protocols.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers are aware of how their audience will interpret their work.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Critical analysis of dance works requires specific criteria and documentation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Reflect upon creative process and products in dance (DOK 1-3)
  2. Understand that dance is a tool to convey concepts, ideas, feelings, and themes (DOK 1-2)
  3. Use traditional vocabulary to describe and evaluate world dance forms (DOK 1-2)
  4. Write a formal critique of a completed work (DOK 1-4)
  5. Articulate ideas presented in choreography (DOK 1-4)
  6. Identify the use of choreographic elements and concepts in a work (DOK 1)
  7. Identify the use of stage elements such as costumes and lighting that contribute to the aesthetics of a performance (DOK 1)
  8. Create review criteria based on choreographic criteria (DOK 1-4)
  9. Create a form of personal documentation for performance or choreographic reference (DOK 1-4)
  10. Describe, analyze, and use notation to respond to dance, and read and record movement in symbols (DOK 1-4)
  11. Evaluate the spatial qualities, time elements, relationships, and quality of a particular performance (DOK 1-4)
  12. Describe personal contributions to the choreographic intent (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does writing a critique clarify one's individual preferences and biases?
  2. In what ways do costumes, lighting, music, and performance spaces contribute to or detract from a dance's theme?
  3. How did dancers document and keep a record of dances before video?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Successful authors describe their story's setting in a way that makes readers feel as though they are there.
  2. Technology can be used to simulate venues, lighting, and costume designs to provide a feel for what work would look like in a professional setting.
  3. Visual artists and graphic designers capture ideas in images.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers observe dance works on a global scale.
  2. Dance allows observers to experience personal moments.
  3. Dance critics provide evidence to support their interpretations.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze and evaluate dance works

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the traditional dance vocabulary used in a dance (DOK 1)
  2. Assess the suitability of a movement, the number of dancers participating, and the length of the work to determine whether the choreographer's intent is clear (DOK 1-4)
  3. Recognize how production factors such as poor-quality sound and props may undermine the aesthetic effect of a performance (DOK 1-2)
  4. Compare and contrast works in writing (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe the movement content of a particular dance work and the effect each component has on the work (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does a particular dance say?
  2. How does a particular dance compare with other dances?
  3. How do the elements of dance clarify the intent?
  4. How can appropriate dance terminology help one to describe the feelings in a particular dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The importance of not becoming overly analytic at the expense of engaging with the whole work and responding to it imaginatively reminds the dancer and the viewer that dance is an art form that can and should be enjoyed
  2. Dance analysis of performance in society provides a structure to frame interpretations from around the world. This framework increases one's possibilities of becoming imaginatively and creatively involved in a work.

Nature Of:

  1. Appreciating dance is a process of observing separate movement components of a dance and perceiving them as related or unrelated happenings.
  2. When reviewing dance, one must be objective, and give reasons for opinions by providing evidence to support an interpretation.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Use basic dance vocabulary to analyze dance works

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize how focus, time, and energy are required to create and perform quality dances (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use traditional dance vocabulary to describe aspects of space, time, and energy in a particular dance (DOK 1)
  3. Recognize how the aesthetic principles of design (sequence, contrast, repetition, and unity) increase artistic clarity (DOK 1-2)
  4. See how contrasts can hold one's attention, while sequence, transition, and unity make viewing satisfying (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe and analyze a sequence in a dance based on basic the Laban or Benesh language of dance concepts, symbols, and vocabulary (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What movements are inspirational?
  2. How can appropriate dance terminology help one to describe the structure and design of a dance?
  3. How does one determine what genre he or she prefers?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Utilizing appropriate vocabulary and principles build toward a literate dancer, choreographer, and viewer, much like musicians, actors, and artists use the vocabulary of the trade to communicate.
  2. Analyzing dance works builds critique and evaluation skills for becoming adept at problem-solving.

Nature Of:

  1. Interpretation of a dance requires understanding the character of a dance, its subject matter, and the qualities that might be described.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Compare and contrast the work of well-known choreographers

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify a choreographer's dance vocabulary (DOK 1)
  2. Identify elements of dance (space, time, and energy) in a work (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one identify with a style?
  2. Why does the choreographer choose to create in a particular style?
  3. How do past choreographers influence present-day choreographers?
  4. How can dance notation help one to better understand the choreographer's intent?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Dance criticism in society serves the purpose of furthering knowledge and increasing the depth of response that is possible when observing and evaluating dance works.
  2. Media such as DVD, film, and the Internet that are used to view dance works of well-known choreographers provide ample opportunities to analyze, re-create, and discuss work.

Nature Of:

  1. Appreciating dance includes having a clear picture of the movement, number of dancers, performance environment, costumes, and sound.
  2. Being objective with a dance give reasons for opinions by providing evidence to support an interpretation.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Evaluate the functions of dance training and rehearsal as they contribute to a performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize how the quality of dance training and rehearsal can affect a performance (DOK 1-2)
  2. Recognize how the quantity of dance training and rehearsal can affect a performance (DOK 1-2)
  3. Recognize when performers move precisely (DOK 1-2)
  4. Evaluate how the dancers' sense of rhythm and interpretation can define the meaning in a dance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How long does it take to train to be a dancer?
  2. What is a good dancer?
  3. What historical factors contributed to the American dance style?
  4. How does one know when he or she is ready for performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Rehearsing and training consistently to produce a desired outcome develops strong self-direction and collaboration skills that can be transferred to many vocations.
  2. Being aware of quality production and performance builds discernment skills needed for lifelong endeavors.

Nature Of:

  1. Appreciating dance includes having a clear picture of the movement, number of dancers, performance environment, costumes, and sound.
  2. Being objective with a dance give reasons for opinions by providing evidence to support an interpretation.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Describe the use of dance elements in choreography

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the dance elements (space, time and energy) (DOK 1)
  2. Identify the compositional elements (DOK 1)
  3. Describe the effectiveness use of the dance elements (DOK 1-3)
  4. Describe in written words how the choice of stimuli, costumes, number of dancers, and movements can change the mood and feeling in a dance (DOK 1-4)
  5. Describe the reason for a dance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do the elements of dance communicate the choreographer's intent?
  2. How do the elements of dance communicate feelings and thoughts?
  3. How does experience in a variety of styles help one to understand a dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Demonstrating the ability to deconstruct a dance work utilizes the same kinds of skills needed to decode unfamiliar words, identify the steps within a math problem, or find details in a painting or photograph.
  2. Recognizing and identifying elements in a dance work provides critical abilities used in many vocations such as film and restaurant critique, sports analysis, real estate, engineering, architecture, and interior and fashion design.
  3. Utilizing film and digital reproduction of dance works enables a viewer to review and analyze a large variety of dance works and compositional elements.

Nature Of:

  1. How a choreographer uses the elements of dance can become his or her signature style.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Compare and contrast different dance styles and world dance forms

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe a performer's use of space (DOK 1-2)
  2. View and examine dance works for their design (DOK 1-2)
  3. Recognize dances that maintain order and structure (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify the use of energy in a particular dance (DOK 1-2)
  5. Understand time as a design element (DOK 1-2)
  6. Describe the timing or changes in timing of an observed dance (DOK 1-2)
  7. Understand the meaning in a movement (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are dances different from each other?
  2. How does each style communicate its meaning?
  3. How do the basic elements of dance communicate feelings and thoughts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Demonstrating the ability to compare and contrast dance styles builds foundational problem-solving and classification skills needed in science, social studies, reading, writing, and visual arts, and leads to a variety of vocations.
  2. Articulating the order, structure, and design elements of dance works creates foundational discernment abilities needed to build reading and writing skills such as sequencing and structuring stories.

Nature Of:

  1. Appreciating dance requires one to recognize the use of space, and the many ways a dance is designed and performed.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Describe the feeling that is communicated through various dances

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe a dance, and show interest and self-discipline (DOK 1)
  2. Observe and describe feelings, steps, and movements in a dance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you know what a particular dance say?
  2. How does one know what the dancers are feeling?
  3. How does an informed vocabulary help in describing a dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The development of self-discipline and personal feelings when observing dance works creates strong self-direction skills and promotes internal dialogue required in beginning reading skills.
  2. Mass media and the entertainment industry rely on the emotional connection and excitement that dance works, competitions, and events foster to improve viewer ratings.

Nature Of:

  1. Behaviors surrounding a dance performance such as audience participation and dancers' preparation may be as important as the performance itself.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Respond to different dance styles using basic stylistic vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe a dance, and tell the story (DOK 1-4)
  2. Describe the movements and gestures that stand out in a particular dance work because they tell the story (DOK 1-2)
  3. Respond to a dance with language of dance symbols or other types of symbols, and relate them to a favorite movement in the dance (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one describe his or her favorite movement in a dance?
  2. Why are dances different from each other?
  3. How does each style communicate its meaning?
  4. How do the basic elements of dance communicate feelings and thoughts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Recognizing simple dance symbols builds an understanding of symbolic language in other disciplines such as reading, music, history - and in environmental print such as road signs and public facilities signs.
  2. Demonstrating the relationship between movement and storytelling builds a foundational awareness of how historical cultures preserved their traditions in the absence of the printed word.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers analyze and document dances and movement to capture their stories.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Display, discuss, and demonstrate appropriate etiquette at a dance performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe a dance and show interest (DOK 1)
  2. Describe favorite movements (DOK 1-3)
  3. Discuss reactions to a dance (DOK 1-3)
  4. Learn to use appropriate dance elements vocabulary to describe a dance movement (DOK 1-2)
  5. Use language of dance symbols or other types of symbols to describe a dance movement (DOK 1-3)
  6. Describe the performer's use of space in a dance movement (DOK 1-2)
  7. Describe how the selected accompaniment fits the mood and idea of a dance (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to watch respectfully during a live dance performance?
  2. Why does an audience applaud?
  3. What parts of a dance are inspirational?
  4. How do the basic elements of dance communicate feelings and thoughts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Enjoying and appreciating dance works are the result of hard work and good teaching, just as a good meal is enjoyed after careful preparation, and sports teams perform well in competition after careful practice and coaching.
  2. Using technology makes available a variety of dance performances that would otherwise be difficult to attend in person. It also aids in learning how to view a performance.
  3. Identifying connections of music and dance builds foundational skills in finding many relationships such as mathematical relationships of even and odd; scientific relationships such as temperature and weather patterns; and color relationships in art such as combining primary colors to create secondary colors.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers must describe what they see in dances in order to understand them and learn from them.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Observe different dance styles, and describe one movement you remember

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe in writing or with a drawing the movement and mood of a particular dance work (DOK 1-4)
  2. Describe a favorite movement from a dance (DOK 1-2)
  3. Enjoy participating in and observing a variety of dance styles (DOK 1)
  4. Respond to a dance with language of dance symbols or other types of symbols, and relate them to a favorite movement (DOK 1-3)
  5. Describe the performer's use of space in a favorite movement from a dance (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are characters portrayed in dance?
  2. How do movement and music differ from one culture to another?
  3. How do the basic elements of dance communicate feelings and thoughts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding why it is important for performers to share space appropriately builds foundational collaborative skills needed in many activities and vocations.
  2. Finding a personal connection to or a specific element of a dance work builds strong identification skills and self-direction, enabling personal decision-making and appropriate use of space in collaborative tasks.

Nature Of:

  1. Dancers observe the movement of others, and create something new based on that knowledge.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate appropriate etiquette at a dance performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. View and respond to a performance in a positive manner (DOK 1)
  2. Describe a favorite movement to the dance performer using basic vocabulary (DOK 1-2)
  3. Discuss and critique short dance works that relate to the topics being studied in dance class (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does movement say?
  2. What is a dancer?
  3. How does a dance make one think about the dancers?
  4. Why is it important to watch respectfully during a live dance performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Employing personal response skills and utilizing descriptive language when viewing a dance work provides an authentic venue for building verbal skills and audience participation skills.
  2. Finding connections to dances and topics of study increases long-term memory and sequencing abilities, which are crucial to language development.

Nature Of:

  1. Enjoying and appreciating dance requires audiences to observe and respond based on what they see and feel.

Content Area: Dance
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 4. Reflect, Connect, and Respond

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Observe and identify different dance genres

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Experience the joy of seeing and responding to dance
  2. Demonstrate movement to express emotion
  3. Describe what is seen and felt in a movement by speaking or drawing a picture

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does dance help to convey feelings?
  2. How does dance help us to learn about other people?
  3. What movements and objects are seen in a particular dance work?
  4. What do you like or dislike about a particular dance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Observing dance works and discussing the emotions a dance creates builds foundational language development skills.
  2. Connecting emotions to dance builds foundational abilities to that recognize ideas and messages are shared in many ways.

Nature Of:

  1. Dance provides the opportunity for people to express their ideas and feelings through movement.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Attentively observe a dance performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. View a performance with attention (DOK 1)
  2. Clap to show joy and appreciation of a dance (DOK 1)
  3. Draw on paper the movement seen in the space of a particular dance work (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is dance used in everyday life?
  2. What do you love about dance?
  3. Why is it important to watch respectfully during a live dance performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Demonstrating appropriate audience behavior builds foundational self-direction skills for many societal events such as live performances, movie showings, public events, and presentations.
  2. Transferring movement that is observed to a drawing on a paper builds foundational fine motor skills.

Nature Of:

  1. Choreographers create dances that have meaning, but people often find their own meaning in those dances.