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New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

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Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Participate at a competent level in a variety of lifelong physical activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Combine and apply movement patterns from simple to complex to participate successfully in aquatic, rhythms/dance, combatives, outdoor adventure activities, and variety of lifelong sports and games (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify, explain, and apply the skill-related components of balance, reaction time, agility, coordination, explosive power, and speed that enhance performance levels in aquatic, rhythms/dance, combatives, outdoor adventure activities, and lifelong sports and games (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain and demonstrate advanced offensive, defensive, coaching, officiating, and transition strategies in lifelong sports and games (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain and demonstrate training and conditioning practices that have the greatest impact on skill acquisition and performance in aquatic, rhythms/dance, combatives, outdoor adventure activities, and a variety of lifelong and individual and dual activities (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are both skill-related fitness and health-related fitness taught? Why is each one important?
  2. Which lifelong physical activities do you think you'll be participating in when you're 20, 40, and 60?
  3. How does being healthy and active affect what one can do in life?
  4. Why is it important for an individual to practice and learn sports skills?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in a wide range of physical activities over the course of their education, with the aim that such participation will continue through an individual's lifetime.
  2. The knowledge and understanding of the concepts of movement improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for the transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and who feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. A strong foundation in physical education prepares an individual for a lifetime of physical activity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Understand the cognitive impact of movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate ability to combine and perform movement sequences (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify parts of the brain and describe how movement impacts brain development (DOK 1)
  3. Describe and participate in movements that promote neural pathway development (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify and evaluate personal psychological responses to physical activity (i.e., anxiety/stress, etc.) (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate the ability to use cognitive information to understand and enhance motor skill acquisition and performance (i.e. left/right dominance factor) (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can movement facilitate or enhance learning in other disciplines?
  2. What is your favorite type of movement and why?
  3. How can one become more mentally prepared for competition and sports performance?
  4. When is anxiety helpful, and when is it harmful in a competitive situation?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in social activities that include rhythm, music, patterns, and cross-lateral movements such as social dance.
  2. Individuals understand the effect that stress, anxiety, and excitement can have on physical performance. People can take steps to control stress, anxiety, and excitement in their workplace.

Nature Of:

  1. Exercise is important for a healthy brain.
  2. The important relationship between the brain and its impact on physical performance and academic learning is integral in the development of the whole child.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of principles and concepts for effective rhythmic motor development

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use a variety of motor skill patterns to create a gymnastics or dance routine (DOK 3-4)
  2. Create and perform a timed routine using rotational, balancing, and supporting skills (DOK 3-4)
  3. Create, develop, and refine movement routines based on self-generated themes and self-selected music (DOK 3-4)
  4. Integrate information from other subject matter into a movement activity or routine (DOK 1-4)
  5. Explain the bio-mechanical principles used in performing various manipulative skills (DOK 1-3)
  6. Describe and demonstrate how movement skills learned in one physical activity can be transferred and used to help to learn another physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  7. Explain how growth in height and weight affects performance and influences the selection of developmentally appropriate physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  8. Identify the characteristics of a highly skilled performance for the purpose of improving one's own performance (DOK 3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which sport would be easiest or hardest to integrate into a movement routine, and why?
  2. What are activities and sports in which balance and body rotation are integral for success?
  3. Under which conditions could the transfer of skills be detrimental?
  4. How can body type such as a gymnast's small body affect success in certain sports?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in activities such as social dances that require the integration of skills and knowledge in their social life.
  2. Individuals understand that the principles of locomotion provide the basics for new skill acquisition.
  3. Individuals make decisions about the activities and sports in which they choose to participate as their interests change over their lifetime.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and who feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Knowing and understanding concepts of movement and skill mechanics can improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Understand and apply game strategies to physical activities and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate basic offensive and defensive skills and strategies in games and sports (DOK 1-3)
  2. Apply locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills to games and sports (DOK 1-3)
  3. Diagram, explain, and justify offensive and defensive strategies in net/wall, target, invasion, and fielding/run scoring games (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify relevant bio-mechanical principles such as force production, compactness, spin or rebound, and rotation and their importance to the successful performance of a variety of activities ) (DOK 1-2)
  5. Develop and teach a game that incorporates designated offensive and defensive space, a penalty system, and a scoring system (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it better to have a strong offense or a strong defense? Why?
  2. As a defense, how does one decide where to force the offense to move with the ball in an invasion game? How does one decide (group decision-making), why does one decide (reading game strategy), and what does one decide (making game strategy)?
  3. To what extent does strategy influence performance in competitive games and activities?
  4. What would a game without a scoring system look like?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate and apply game strategies in a wide range of sports and games in community-organized sports leagues.
  2. Individuals implement effective offensive, defensive, and cooperative strategies to be successful in game situations.
  3. Individuals understand that game strategy can increase enjoyment and participation in a range of activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. A strong foundation in physical education prepares an individual for a lifetime of physical activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Combine the critical elements of movement and skills concepts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Design and perform gymnastics or dance sequences that combine traveling, balancing, and weight transfer into smooth, flowing sequences with changes in direction, speed, and flow (DOK 3-4)
  2. Cooperate with another student to create, develop, and refine movement routines based on a theme (DOK 3-4)
  3. Create a game, movement, dance, or sport with a group (DOK 3-4)
  4. Identify and describe key elements in the mature performance of overhand, sidearm, and underhand throwing catching; kicking and punting; striking; trapping; dribbling (hand and foot); and volleying (DOK 1-2)
  5. Analyze movement patterns, and correct errors (DOK 1-4)
  6. Use principles from motor learning to establish, monitor, and meet goals for motor skill development (DOK 1-3)
  7. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of practicing skills as a whole and practicing skills in smaller parts (DOK 1-3)
  8. Diagram and demonstrate basic offensive and defensive strategies for individual and dual physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  9. Develop an individual or dual game that uses a manipulative skill, two different offensive strategies, and a scoring system, and teach it to another person (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do some physical activities require more complex movements than others?
  2. How does one determine what the goal is when creating a game, movement, dance, or sport with a group?
  3. What are some activities and sports in which balance and body rotation are integral for success?
  4. When would it be most effective to learn a skill in parts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. While practicing a sport with friends, individuals identify the key elements used to perform movement patterns.
  2. Individuals compare movement patterns of a sport with the movement patterns of everyday life.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and who feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  3. There are similarities in movements and skill mechanics between different sports.
  4. Knowledge of critical elements for a variety of skills encourages connections and application of those elements when learning a new sport or activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate beginning strategies for a variety of games and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Volley an object repeatedly with a partner, using the forearm pass (DOK 1-2)
  2. Strike a ball continually against a wall and with a partner, using a paddle for the forehand stroke and backhand stroke (DOK 1-3)
  3. Strike an object consistently, using a body part so that the object travels in the intended direction at the desired height (DOK 1-2)
  4. Strike an object consistently, using an implement so that the object travels in the intended direction at the desired height (DOK 1-3)
  5. Dribble and pass a ball to a partner while being guarded (DOK 1-3)
  6. Throw an object accurately and with applied force, using the underhand, overhand, and sidearm movement (throw) patterns (DOK 1-2)
  7. Combine relationships, levels, speed, direction, and pathways in complex individual and group physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  8. Combine motor skills to play a lead-up or modified game (DOK 1-3)
  9. Describe ways to create more space between an offensive player and a defensive player

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are speed and accuracy important?
  2. Why is it important to learn fundamental skills before advanced skills?
  3. Which is more important to master first - accuracy or speed? Why?
  4. How does one increase accuracy in a skill?
  5. What are some sports that require more skill and strategy than others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in a variety of games and sports.
  2. Individuals create a game that utilizes levels, speeds, directions, and pathways.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. A strong foundation in physical education prepares an individual for a lifetime of successful participation in physical activity.
  3. Games and sports require a variety of skills and strategies to be successful.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Participate in activities that require problem-solving, cooperation, skill assessment, and teambuilding

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in and understand the value of initiative and cooperative activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Develop a problem-solving skill assessment (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What activities require problem-solving, cooperation, and team-building? Why?
  2. Is cooperation or competition more important? Why?
  3. Is it more important to learn to compete first, or learn to cooperate first? Can one aid the other?
  4. Why is team-building important?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals use team-building activities to enhance group cohesion.
  2. Individuals use problem-solving skills to overcome a physical challenge at home such as moving furniture safely without damage.
  3. Individuals cooperate in a variety of physical tasks at home such as painting a house.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Physical education settings provide a problem-solving arena, with the problem able to be increased or decreased by changing a number of factors such as the number of participants, level of competition, and umber of rules for activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate mature form for all basic locomotor, nonlocomotor , manipulative, and rhythmic skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Throw and catch objects such as basketballs, footballs, or Frisbees, and demonstrate both accuracy and force (DOK 1-3)
  2. Punt a ball dropped from the hands at a target (DOK 1-2)
  3. Dribble a ball (by hand or foot) while preventing another person from stealing the ball (DOK 1-3)
  4. Volley an object continuously with a partner (DOK 1-2)
  5. Demonstrate efficient patterns of striking with and without an implement (DOK 1-2)
  6. Demonstrate correct steps and patterns for square, folk, and contemporary dances (DOK 1-3)
  7. Perform a jump routine to music with a partner or small group (DOK 1-3)
  8. Develop and refine a gymnastics or creative dance sequence, and demonstrate smooth transitions (DOK 1-4)
  9. Develop and refine a gymnastics sequence or creative dance sequence that combines traveling, rolling, balancing, and weight transfer into smooth-flowing sequences with intentional changes in direction, speed, and flow (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Will understanding these skills allow for participation in other activities later in life?
  2. How could one perform a jump routine to different types of music?
  3. Why does one need to know a variety of dances?
  4. What can dance teach one about other sports?
  5. How can one create a gymnastics routine without moving from one place to another?
  6. What types of dancing are similar to each other?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals engage successfully in activities utilizing manipulatives.
  2. Individuals use a combination of skills to demonstrate self-expression and creativity.
  3. Individuals analyze the basic locomotor, nonlocomotor, and rhythmic shifts of a social dance.
  4. Individuals analyze the basic locomotor, nonlocomotor, and rhythmic shifts of people playing in a public park.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Individuals who are more skillful are more likely to participate in physical activity over a lifetime.
  3. The ability to dance can be an advantage in a variety of social situations.
  4. Motor skills and movement patterns appear in a wide variety of physical activities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate understanding of how to combine and apply movement concepts and principles to learn and develop motor skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Combine skills to competently participate in a variety of activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Select appropriate practice options based on the similarities and differences between two skills (DOK 1-3)
  3. Select appropriate exercises that enhance learning and performing a selected activity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze and correct errors in throw, catch, hand dribble, foot dribble, striking a ball, and volley, and demonstrate control and accuracy (DOK 1-3)
  5. Analyze and correct errors in nonlocomotor and locomotor movements (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze and use basic offensive and defensive strategies, and apply rules in modified games and activities (DOK 1-4)
  7. Analyze and demonstrate a variety of social, folk, square, modern, jazz, or creative dance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some activities that require the combination of skills?
  2. How can one create a game that uses different striking skills?
  3. How can one get better at a skill without physically practicing?
  4. Which skills can one take from other activities that will allow one to become better in your selected activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in recreational games that require skill combinations such as basketball and tennis.
  2. Individuals determine if control or accuracy is more important when playing games such as softball and volleyball in community-organized leagues.
  3. Individuals analyze their own and others' movements while playing pick-up sport games such as basketball to develop their own skills.
  4. Individuals create a workout that enhances their performance in an activity.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Knowing and understanding concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the major characteristics of mature locomotor, nonlocomotor , manipulative, and rhythmic skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Dribble and pass an object such as a basketball or soccer ball to a moving receiver (DOK 1-3)
  2. Throw, catch, and kick to self or a partner (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate ability to adapt and adjust movement skills to changing conditions such as rising and sinking while twisting or using different rhythms (DOK 1-3)
  4. Develop and refine a gymnastics sequence that demonstrates smooth transitions (DOK 1-3)
  5. Develop and refine a creative dance sequence into a repeatable pattern (DOK 1-3)
  6. Jump and land for height and distance using mature form (DOK 1-2)
  7. Recognize and demonstrate agility, balance, coordination, power, speed, and reaction time in a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-2)
  8. Use a variety of manipulatives to throw to a moving target, making the needed adjustments for skill improvement (DOK 1-3)
  9. Create a routine to music (DOK 1-4)
  10. Demonstrate balances with control on a variety of objects such as a balance board, balance beam, or skates (ice or in-line) (DOK 1-2)
  11. Transfer weight from feet to hands at fast and slow speeds using large extensions such as mule kicks, handstands, or cartwheels (DOK 1-2)
  12. Distinguish and describe the similarities and differences of manipulative skills such as punting and kicking, and overhand and underhand (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which is more important - accuracy or speed? Why?
  2. Which dances from today will be considered traditional 100 years from now? Why?
  3. Why is it important to know traditional dances?
  4. How can balance skills help to prevent injuries?
  5. Which is harder to learn - in-line skating or ice-skating?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in playground or backyard games to develop locomotor, nonlocomotor, manipulative, and rhythmic skills, such as catching and throwing baseballs or playing tag.
  2. Individuals participate in dances that are part of a community festival.
  3. Individuals participate successfully in balance activities such as skiing or skating.
  4. Individuals compare modern social dances to traditional social dances in terms of similar movement skills.
  5. Individuals identify the locomotor skills and rhythmic skills in modern devices found around the home such as bicycles.

Nature Of:

  1. Skillful movers are more likely to participate successfully in physical activity over a lifetime.
  2. Good balance skills are important for lifelong wellness and injury prevention.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate a variety of motor patterns in simple combinations while participating in activities, games, and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate changes of pathways, levels, forces, and direction with manipulatives such as hoops, streamers, and balls (DOK 1-3)
  2. Combine locomotor movements in time to music (DOK 1-3)
  3. Dribble in soccer or basketball while changing speed and direction (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate throwing, catching, striking ,or trapping in an activity (DOK 1-2)
  5. Demonstrate skills of chasing, fleeing, and dodging to avoid others (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it enjoyable to combine locomotor movements in time to music?
  2. How is dribbling a soccer ball different from dribbling a basketball?
  3. Which combination of locomotor skills is most aesthetically pleasing?
  4. Why are some games more enjoyable than others?
  5. How do varying types of activity, challenges, and team versus individual activities contribute to enjoyment?
  6. Why do some people find some games more enjoyable than others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals move successfully and skillfully under a variety of movement conditions in their daily activities such as playing basketball or playing tag with friends.
  2. Individuals participate skillfully in a variety of games that require movement and skills.
  3. Individuals combine locomotor movements in time to music while dancing at home or at a social dance.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to combine skills in meaningful ways is critical for success in most forms of physical activity.
  2. Games and sports have motor patterns that appear in simple combinations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform movements that engage the brain to facilitate learning

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, create, and demonstrate movements that require crossing the mid-line (DOK 1-3)
  2. Perform successfully a variety of jump-rope skills using both short and long ropes, and jump to various tempos (DOK 1-2)
  3. Combine jumping, tossing, dribbling, or catching to music or rhythmic beat (DOK 1-3)
  4. Perform a basic tinikling step to 3/4 time (close, tap, and tap) (DOK 1-3)
  5. Balance demonstrating momentary stillness in symmetrical and nonsymmetrical shapes on a variety of body parts (DOK 1-3)
  6. Perform forward and backward rolls with variation (DOK 1-2)
  7. Combine two or more rotational skills (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What must one think about when doing a forward roll?
  2. Which activities are most effective for crossing the mid-line?
  3. How does one use his or her mind in various activities and sports?
  4. What are the benefits to combining activities such as jumping or dribbling to a rhythmic beat?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals learn new movements such as jumping rope to engage the brain.
  2. Individuals perform routines of physical movement that may include dance steps, jumping rope, or a variation of forward and backward rolls.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Exercise is linked to healthy brain development, and certain movements such as cross-laterals, patterns, rhythms are proven to be beneficial for making body and brain connections.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate the elements of movement in combination with a variety of locomotor skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate skipping, hopping, galloping, and sliding while transitioning on command (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate smooth transitions between sequential motor skills such as running into a jump (DOK 1-2)
  3. Move using the concepts of space awareness and movement control to run, hop, and skip in different ways in a large group without bumping into others or falling (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify major characteristics of the skills of walking, running, jumping, hopping, and leaping (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is walking different from running?
  2. What activities require one to change movement skill during the activity?
  3. How can one perform a skill without thinking about it?
  4. If you could only master one of the locomotor movements, which one would you choose, and why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals move skillfully under a variety of movement conditions.
  2. Individuals participate skillfully in a variety of games at home that require movement such as playing tag, skipping, or jumping rope.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. The different combinations or ways that movement can be performed are virtually limitless.
  3. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  4. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate control and balance in traveling and weight-bearing activities using a variety of body parts and implements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move to even and uneven beats using various locomotor movements (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create a routine that includes two types of body rolls such as a log roll, egg roll, shoulder roll, or forward roll and a stationary balance position after each roll (DOK 1-4)
  3. Jump rope repeatedly (DOK 1)
  4. Throw, catch, strike, and trap objects while being stationary and also moving toward a partner (DOK 1-3)
  5. Balance objects on various body parts while in various positions (DOK 1-2)
  6. Demonstrate static and dynamic balance on lines or low beams and benches (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to be able to move in both even and uneven rhythms?
  2. What does it mean to have rhythm?
  3. What body parts are involved when one jumps rope?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in a variety of activities such as playing basketball with friends while maintaining control of the body.
  2. Individuals participate successfully in activities that require balance.
  3. Individuals participate in activities such as social dances that require movements to even and uneven beats.
  4. Individuals participate in activities that require throwing and catching with a friend such as playing catch with a football.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate basic locomotor and nonlocomotor skills, and rhythmic and cross-lateral movements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move in different directions and at high, medium, and low levels in space (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate locomotor movements in a variety of pathways and levels (DOK 1-2)
  3. Travel in forward and sideways directions using a variety of locomotor and nonlocomotor patterns, and change direction quickly in response to a signal (DOK 1-2)
  4. Perform a simple dance step in keeping with a specific tempo (DOK 1-3)
  5. Travel to a variety of rhythms changing time, force, and flow (DOK 1-3)
  6. Manipulate objects such as jump ropes, scarves, hoops, and balls (DOK 1-2)
  7. Balance at different levels on different body parts (DOK 1-2)
  8. Demonstrate both static and dynamic balances (DOK 1-2)
  9. Perform rhythmical movements using small musical aids (DOK 1-3)
  10. Perform a singing dance in a group (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If you were to invent a new locomotor movement, what would it look like, and what would you call it?
  2. Why are dances like the "chicken dance," "bunny hop," and "electric slide" so popular at group gatherings such as wedding receptions?
  3. Why would someone want to know how to do the same things in different ways?
  4. What does it mean to have rhythm? How can one notice whether someone has it?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals move skillfully under a variety of movement conditions.
  2. Individuals successfully ride a two-wheeled bike without training wheels.
  3. Individuals ride a skateboard or skates.
  4. Individuals participate in games that require movement such as playing basketball or tag.
  5. Individuals participate in games that require the use of objects such as jump ropes and balls.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Movement to a beat or pattern activates the brain to facilitate learning.
  3. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate fundamental manipulative skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Standing in place, dribble a ball five times with one's dominant hand (DOK 1)
  2. Throw a ball while stepping forward in opposition (DOK 1)
  3. Strike a stationary object (DOK 1)
  4. Throw an object with an overhand and underhand motion (DOK 1)
  5. Toss a ball to oneself using the underhand throw pattern, and catch it before it bounces (DOK 1)
  6. Catch a thrown large object with both hands (DOK 1)
  7. Kick a stationary object using a simple kicking pattern (DOK 1)
  8. Use body parts and light implements to strike stationary and moving objects (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one get better at throwing a ball?
  2. What is the most effective way to throw a ball?
  3. When is striking used in games and sports?
  4. Is it easier to catch a bigger object or a smaller one? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in activities that require patterned movements such as playing softball or basketball.
  2. Individuals recognize manipulative skills in games and sports by watching sporting events on television.
  3. Individuals recognize manipulative skills in games and sports by watching friends and family members participate in sports.
  4. Individuals demonstrate the skillful use of a variety of manipulatives.
  5. Individuals participate in activities that require the use of manipulatives.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Patterned, rhythmic movement activates the brain to facilitate learning.
  3. Many popular games and sports require the skillful manipulation of an object or objects.
  4. Repetition improves the performance of motor skills.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate body and spatial awareness through movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Travel within a large group without bumping into others or falling while using a variety of locomotor skills (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate contrasts between slow and fast speeds while using locomotor skills (DOK 1-3)
  3. Create shapes at high, medium, and low levels by using hands, arms, torso, feet, and legs in a variety of combinations (DOK 1-3)
  4. Travel in straight, curved, and zigzag pathways (DOK 1-2)
  5. Move in opposition and alternately (DOK 1-2)
  6. Move synchronously with others (DOK 1-2)
  7. Participate in chase-and-flee activities that include various spatial relationships (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When is moving at a fast speed safer, and when is moving at a slow speed safer?
  2. Which animals use the same movements?
  3. When moving in a group, how do you keep from bumping into each other?
  4. Why is it easier to move in the same direction in which a group is moving than to move against the group?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in games that require movement as a group.
  2. Individuals travel successfully and safely in a variety of activities with a large group of friends and family members such as to the movies or a county fair.
  3. Individuals create letters of the alphabet using their arms, legs, and torso.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Spatial awareness is critical for success in any movement-based activity.
  3. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Travel in a variety of directions using basic locomotor skills, and demonstrate understanding of personal and general space

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move safely in a large group without bumping into others or falling while using locomotor skills (DOK 1-2)
  2. Travel forward and sideways while changing directions quickly in response to a signal (DOK 1-2)
  3. Jump over a stationary rope several times in succession using forward-and-back and side-to-side movement patterns (DOK 1-2)
  4. Move with even and uneven rhythms (DOK 1-2)
  5. Perform movements to the rhythm of music (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which movements are easy to control when in a large group?
  2. Which types of music are more rhythmic?
  3. Which are easier - even or uneven rhythms? Why?
  4. Why is a certain amount of space needed between members of a group while the group is moving?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals travel successfully and safely with family members in a variety of activities such as to a shopping center, country fair, or movie theaters.
  2. Individuals follow a rhythmic pattern when jumping rope with friends.
  3. Individuals participate in games that require movement.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Spatial awareness is critical for success in any movement-based activity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate balance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explore balancing on different body parts at different levels, becoming "like" a statue while making symmetrical and nonsymmetrical shapes (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of under, over, behind, next to, through, right, left, up, down, forward, backward ,and in front of by using the body and an object (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How long could one safely remain in an upside down position?
  2. Why is it easier to stand on two legs than one?
  3. What happens to balance when one spins around?
  4. Why was it easier for small children to crawl first before they learn how to walk?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals successfully ride a tricycle.
  2. Individuals successfully get on and off a moving escalator.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.