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New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

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Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Participate at a competent level in a variety of lifelong physical activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Combine and apply movement patterns from simple to complex to participate successfully in aquatic, rhythms/dance, combatives, outdoor adventure activities, and variety of lifelong sports and games (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify, explain, and apply the skill-related components of balance, reaction time, agility, coordination, explosive power, and speed that enhance performance levels in aquatic, rhythms/dance, combatives, outdoor adventure activities, and lifelong sports and games (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain and demonstrate advanced offensive, defensive, coaching, officiating, and transition strategies in lifelong sports and games (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain and demonstrate training and conditioning practices that have the greatest impact on skill acquisition and performance in aquatic, rhythms/dance, combatives, outdoor adventure activities, and a variety of lifelong and individual and dual activities (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are both skill-related fitness and health-related fitness taught? Why is each one important?
  2. Which lifelong physical activities do you think you'll be participating in when you're 20, 40, and 60?
  3. How does being healthy and active affect what one can do in life?
  4. Why is it important for an individual to practice and learn sports skills?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in a wide range of physical activities over the course of their education, with the aim that such participation will continue through an individual's lifetime.
  2. The knowledge and understanding of the concepts of movement improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for the transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and who feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. A strong foundation in physical education prepares an individual for a lifetime of physical activity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Understand the cognitive impact of movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate ability to combine and perform movement sequences (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify parts of the brain and describe how movement impacts brain development (DOK 1)
  3. Describe and participate in movements that promote neural pathway development (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify and evaluate personal psychological responses to physical activity (i.e., anxiety/stress, etc.) (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate the ability to use cognitive information to understand and enhance motor skill acquisition and performance (i.e. left/right dominance factor) (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can movement facilitate or enhance learning in other disciplines?
  2. What is your favorite type of movement and why?
  3. How can one become more mentally prepared for competition and sports performance?
  4. When is anxiety helpful, and when is it harmful in a competitive situation?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in social activities that include rhythm, music, patterns, and cross-lateral movements such as social dance.
  2. Individuals understand the effect that stress, anxiety, and excitement can have on physical performance. People can take steps to control stress, anxiety, and excitement in their workplace.

Nature Of:

  1. Exercise is important for a healthy brain.
  2. The important relationship between the brain and its impact on physical performance and academic learning is integral in the development of the whole child.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Apply rules, principles, problem-solving skills and concepts to traditional and nontraditional movement settings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze and explain training and conditioning practices that have the greatest impact on skill acquisition and successful performance in a variety of lifelong activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create or modify practice and training plans based on evaluative feedback of skill acquisition and performance in a variety of lifelong activities (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of training and participating year-round in one sport, or training and participating in multiple sports in a year?
  2. How does one develop an appropriate personal fitness program?
  3. What techniques can be employed to maintain motivation?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals develop and implement a fitness program that utilizes appropriate training principles necessary for a lifetime of fitness such as jogging two days per week, or lifting weights two days a week.
  2. Periodically evaluate the effectiveness of one's personal fitness program.

Nature Of:

  1. The integration of the health and skill-related fitness components in designing and implementing a personal fitness plan supports a healthy, active lifestyle.
  2. Ongoing feedback and assessment are necessary to determine the effectiveness of a personal fitness program.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of principles and concepts for effective rhythmic motor development

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use a variety of motor skill patterns to create a gymnastics or dance routine (DOK 3-4)
  2. Create and perform a timed routine using rotational, balancing, and supporting skills (DOK 3-4)
  3. Create, develop, and refine movement routines based on self-generated themes and self-selected music (DOK 3-4)
  4. Integrate information from other subject matter into a movement activity or routine (DOK 1-4)
  5. Explain the bio-mechanical principles used in performing various manipulative skills (DOK 1-3)
  6. Describe and demonstrate how movement skills learned in one physical activity can be transferred and used to help to learn another physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  7. Explain how growth in height and weight affects performance and influences the selection of developmentally appropriate physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  8. Identify the characteristics of a highly skilled performance for the purpose of improving one's own performance (DOK 3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which sport would be easiest or hardest to integrate into a movement routine, and why?
  2. What are activities and sports in which balance and body rotation are integral for success?
  3. Under which conditions could the transfer of skills be detrimental?
  4. How can body type such as a gymnast's small body affect success in certain sports?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in activities such as social dances that require the integration of skills and knowledge in their social life.
  2. Individuals understand that the principles of locomotion provide the basics for new skill acquisition.
  3. Individuals make decisions about the activities and sports in which they choose to participate as their interests change over their lifetime.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and who feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Knowing and understanding concepts of movement and skill mechanics can improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Understand and apply game strategies to physical activities and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate basic offensive and defensive skills and strategies in games and sports (DOK 1-3)
  2. Apply locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills to games and sports (DOK 1-3)
  3. Diagram, explain, and justify offensive and defensive strategies in net/wall, target, invasion, and fielding/run scoring games (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify relevant bio-mechanical principles such as force production, compactness, spin or rebound, and rotation and their importance to the successful performance of a variety of activities ) (DOK 1-2)
  5. Develop and teach a game that incorporates designated offensive and defensive space, a penalty system, and a scoring system (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it better to have a strong offense or a strong defense? Why?
  2. As a defense, how does one decide where to force the offense to move with the ball in an invasion game? How does one decide (group decision-making), why does one decide (reading game strategy), and what does one decide (making game strategy)?
  3. To what extent does strategy influence performance in competitive games and activities?
  4. What would a game without a scoring system look like?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate and apply game strategies in a wide range of sports and games in community-organized sports leagues.
  2. Individuals implement effective offensive, defensive, and cooperative strategies to be successful in game situations.
  3. Individuals understand that game strategy can increase enjoyment and participation in a range of activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. A strong foundation in physical education prepares an individual for a lifetime of physical activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Combine the critical elements of movement and skills concepts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Design and perform gymnastics or dance sequences that combine traveling, balancing, and weight transfer into smooth, flowing sequences with changes in direction, speed, and flow (DOK 3-4)
  2. Cooperate with another student to create, develop, and refine movement routines based on a theme (DOK 3-4)
  3. Create a game, movement, dance, or sport with a group (DOK 3-4)
  4. Identify and describe key elements in the mature performance of overhand, sidearm, and underhand throwing catching; kicking and punting; striking; trapping; dribbling (hand and foot); and volleying (DOK 1-2)
  5. Analyze movement patterns, and correct errors (DOK 1-4)
  6. Use principles from motor learning to establish, monitor, and meet goals for motor skill development (DOK 1-3)
  7. Compare and contrast the effectiveness of practicing skills as a whole and practicing skills in smaller parts (DOK 1-3)
  8. Diagram and demonstrate basic offensive and defensive strategies for individual and dual physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  9. Develop an individual or dual game that uses a manipulative skill, two different offensive strategies, and a scoring system, and teach it to another person (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do some physical activities require more complex movements than others?
  2. How does one determine what the goal is when creating a game, movement, dance, or sport with a group?
  3. What are some activities and sports in which balance and body rotation are integral for success?
  4. When would it be most effective to learn a skill in parts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. While practicing a sport with friends, individuals identify the key elements used to perform movement patterns.
  2. Individuals compare movement patterns of a sport with the movement patterns of everyday life.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and who feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  3. There are similarities in movements and skill mechanics between different sports.
  4. Knowledge of critical elements for a variety of skills encourages connections and application of those elements when learning a new sport or activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate beginning strategies for a variety of games and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Volley an object repeatedly with a partner, using the forearm pass (DOK 1-2)
  2. Strike a ball continually against a wall and with a partner, using a paddle for the forehand stroke and backhand stroke (DOK 1-3)
  3. Strike an object consistently, using a body part so that the object travels in the intended direction at the desired height (DOK 1-2)
  4. Strike an object consistently, using an implement so that the object travels in the intended direction at the desired height (DOK 1-3)
  5. Dribble and pass a ball to a partner while being guarded (DOK 1-3)
  6. Throw an object accurately and with applied force, using the underhand, overhand, and sidearm movement (throw) patterns (DOK 1-2)
  7. Combine relationships, levels, speed, direction, and pathways in complex individual and group physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  8. Combine motor skills to play a lead-up or modified game (DOK 1-3)
  9. Describe ways to create more space between an offensive player and a defensive player

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are speed and accuracy important?
  2. Why is it important to learn fundamental skills before advanced skills?
  3. Which is more important to master first - accuracy or speed? Why?
  4. How does one increase accuracy in a skill?
  5. What are some sports that require more skill and strategy than others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in a variety of games and sports.
  2. Individuals create a game that utilizes levels, speeds, directions, and pathways.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. A strong foundation in physical education prepares an individual for a lifetime of successful participation in physical activity.
  3. Games and sports require a variety of skills and strategies to be successful.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Participate in activities that require problem-solving, cooperation, skill assessment, and teambuilding

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in and understand the value of initiative and cooperative activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Develop a problem-solving skill assessment (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What activities require problem-solving, cooperation, and team-building? Why?
  2. Is cooperation or competition more important? Why?
  3. Is it more important to learn to compete first, or learn to cooperate first? Can one aid the other?
  4. Why is team-building important?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals use team-building activities to enhance group cohesion.
  2. Individuals use problem-solving skills to overcome a physical challenge at home such as moving furniture safely without damage.
  3. Individuals cooperate in a variety of physical tasks at home such as painting a house.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Physical education settings provide a problem-solving arena, with the problem able to be increased or decreased by changing a number of factors such as the number of participants, level of competition, and umber of rules for activity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Use information from a variety of resources to improve performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use basic understanding of the knowledge of strategies in activity settings such as moving to open space to receive a pass or intercepting an object (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and correct errors in movement patterns, and provide and use feedback from a peer or instruction technology (DOK 1-4)
  3. Develop a cooperative movement game that uses locomotor skills, object manipulation, and an offensive strategy, and teach the game to another person (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can aspects of movement contribute to the aesthetic dimension of physical activity?
  2. When would the use of video feedback be more useful for learning a skill than feedback from a peer or teacher?
  3. What resources could one use to improve performance?
  4. What resource works best for you in improving performance? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals show family members how to play a game that uses locomotor skills.
  2. Individuals use the Internet to study strategies of a game.

Nature Of:

  1. Knowing and understanding concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  2. Technology can be used as a tool to improve physical performance. For example, pulse monitors maximize performance.
  3. The implementation of effective offensive, defensive, and cooperative strategies is beneficial for all players to be successful in game situations.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate mature form for all basic locomotor, nonlocomotor , manipulative, and rhythmic skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Throw and catch objects such as basketballs, footballs, or Frisbees, and demonstrate both accuracy and force (DOK 1-3)
  2. Punt a ball dropped from the hands at a target (DOK 1-2)
  3. Dribble a ball (by hand or foot) while preventing another person from stealing the ball (DOK 1-3)
  4. Volley an object continuously with a partner (DOK 1-2)
  5. Demonstrate efficient patterns of striking with and without an implement (DOK 1-2)
  6. Demonstrate correct steps and patterns for square, folk, and contemporary dances (DOK 1-3)
  7. Perform a jump routine to music with a partner or small group (DOK 1-3)
  8. Develop and refine a gymnastics or creative dance sequence, and demonstrate smooth transitions (DOK 1-4)
  9. Develop and refine a gymnastics sequence or creative dance sequence that combines traveling, rolling, balancing, and weight transfer into smooth-flowing sequences with intentional changes in direction, speed, and flow (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Will understanding these skills allow for participation in other activities later in life?
  2. How could one perform a jump routine to different types of music?
  3. Why does one need to know a variety of dances?
  4. What can dance teach one about other sports?
  5. How can one create a gymnastics routine without moving from one place to another?
  6. What types of dancing are similar to each other?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals engage successfully in activities utilizing manipulatives.
  2. Individuals use a combination of skills to demonstrate self-expression and creativity.
  3. Individuals analyze the basic locomotor, nonlocomotor, and rhythmic shifts of a social dance.
  4. Individuals analyze the basic locomotor, nonlocomotor, and rhythmic shifts of people playing in a public park.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Individuals who are more skillful are more likely to participate in physical activity over a lifetime.
  3. The ability to dance can be an advantage in a variety of social situations.
  4. Motor skills and movement patterns appear in a wide variety of physical activities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate understanding of how to combine and apply movement concepts and principles to learn and develop motor skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Combine skills to competently participate in a variety of activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Select appropriate practice options based on the similarities and differences between two skills (DOK 1-3)
  3. Select appropriate exercises that enhance learning and performing a selected activity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze and correct errors in throw, catch, hand dribble, foot dribble, striking a ball, and volley, and demonstrate control and accuracy (DOK 1-3)
  5. Analyze and correct errors in nonlocomotor and locomotor movements (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze and use basic offensive and defensive strategies, and apply rules in modified games and activities (DOK 1-4)
  7. Analyze and demonstrate a variety of social, folk, square, modern, jazz, or creative dance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some activities that require the combination of skills?
  2. How can one create a game that uses different striking skills?
  3. How can one get better at a skill without physically practicing?
  4. Which skills can one take from other activities that will allow one to become better in your selected activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in recreational games that require skill combinations such as basketball and tennis.
  2. Individuals determine if control or accuracy is more important when playing games such as softball and volleyball in community-organized leagues.
  3. Individuals analyze their own and others' movements while playing pick-up sport games such as basketball to develop their own skills.
  4. Individuals create a workout that enhances their performance in an activity.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Knowing and understanding concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the major characteristics of mature locomotor, nonlocomotor , manipulative, and rhythmic skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Dribble and pass an object such as a basketball or soccer ball to a moving receiver (DOK 1-3)
  2. Throw, catch, and kick to self or a partner (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate ability to adapt and adjust movement skills to changing conditions such as rising and sinking while twisting or using different rhythms (DOK 1-3)
  4. Develop and refine a gymnastics sequence that demonstrates smooth transitions (DOK 1-3)
  5. Develop and refine a creative dance sequence into a repeatable pattern (DOK 1-3)
  6. Jump and land for height and distance using mature form (DOK 1-2)
  7. Recognize and demonstrate agility, balance, coordination, power, speed, and reaction time in a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-2)
  8. Use a variety of manipulatives to throw to a moving target, making the needed adjustments for skill improvement (DOK 1-3)
  9. Create a routine to music (DOK 1-4)
  10. Demonstrate balances with control on a variety of objects such as a balance board, balance beam, or skates (ice or in-line) (DOK 1-2)
  11. Transfer weight from feet to hands at fast and slow speeds using large extensions such as mule kicks, handstands, or cartwheels (DOK 1-2)
  12. Distinguish and describe the similarities and differences of manipulative skills such as punting and kicking, and overhand and underhand (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which is more important - accuracy or speed? Why?
  2. Which dances from today will be considered traditional 100 years from now? Why?
  3. Why is it important to know traditional dances?
  4. How can balance skills help to prevent injuries?
  5. Which is harder to learn - in-line skating or ice-skating?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate successfully in playground or backyard games to develop locomotor, nonlocomotor, manipulative, and rhythmic skills, such as catching and throwing baseballs or playing tag.
  2. Individuals participate in dances that are part of a community festival.
  3. Individuals participate successfully in balance activities such as skiing or skating.
  4. Individuals compare modern social dances to traditional social dances in terms of similar movement skills.
  5. Individuals identify the locomotor skills and rhythmic skills in modern devices found around the home such as bicycles.

Nature Of:

  1. Skillful movers are more likely to participate successfully in physical activity over a lifetime.
  2. Good balance skills are important for lifelong wellness and injury prevention.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Provide and receive feedback to and from peers using the major characteristics of mature locomotor and manipulative skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use peer assessment tools to recognize and evaluate the critical elements of movement in a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify critical elements of movements skills when watching a video for self assessment (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know the critical elements of movement?
  2. Why is it important to improve physical skills?
  3. What can a partner tell one about one's skills that he or she cannot see oneself?
  4. Why is it helpful to give feedback to a peer?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals watch people performing sports to learn elements of movement for evaluating locomotor and manipulative skills.
  2. Individuals use videos cameras to record elements of movement for evaluating locomotor and manipulative skills.
  3. Individuals ask friends for advice about their performance of locomotor skills when playing games.

Nature Of:

  1. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  2. Ongoing feedback and assessment is necessary in determining the effectiveness of personal goal-setting strategies.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate a variety of motor patterns in simple combinations while participating in activities, games, and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate changes of pathways, levels, forces, and direction with manipulatives such as hoops, streamers, and balls (DOK 1-3)
  2. Combine locomotor movements in time to music (DOK 1-3)
  3. Dribble in soccer or basketball while changing speed and direction (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate throwing, catching, striking ,or trapping in an activity (DOK 1-2)
  5. Demonstrate skills of chasing, fleeing, and dodging to avoid others (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it enjoyable to combine locomotor movements in time to music?
  2. How is dribbling a soccer ball different from dribbling a basketball?
  3. Which combination of locomotor skills is most aesthetically pleasing?
  4. Why are some games more enjoyable than others?
  5. How do varying types of activity, challenges, and team versus individual activities contribute to enjoyment?
  6. Why do some people find some games more enjoyable than others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals move successfully and skillfully under a variety of movement conditions in their daily activities such as playing basketball or playing tag with friends.
  2. Individuals participate skillfully in a variety of games that require movement and skills.
  3. Individuals combine locomotor movements in time to music while dancing at home or at a social dance.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to combine skills in meaningful ways is critical for success in most forms of physical activity.
  2. Games and sports have motor patterns that appear in simple combinations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform movements that engage the brain to facilitate learning

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, create, and demonstrate movements that require crossing the mid-line (DOK 1-3)
  2. Perform successfully a variety of jump-rope skills using both short and long ropes, and jump to various tempos (DOK 1-2)
  3. Combine jumping, tossing, dribbling, or catching to music or rhythmic beat (DOK 1-3)
  4. Perform a basic tinikling step to 3/4 time (close, tap, and tap) (DOK 1-3)
  5. Balance demonstrating momentary stillness in symmetrical and nonsymmetrical shapes on a variety of body parts (DOK 1-3)
  6. Perform forward and backward rolls with variation (DOK 1-2)
  7. Combine two or more rotational skills (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What must one think about when doing a forward roll?
  2. Which activities are most effective for crossing the mid-line?
  3. How does one use his or her mind in various activities and sports?
  4. What are the benefits to combining activities such as jumping or dribbling to a rhythmic beat?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals learn new movements such as jumping rope to engage the brain.
  2. Individuals perform routines of physical movement that may include dance steps, jumping rope, or a variation of forward and backward rolls.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Exercise is linked to healthy brain development, and certain movements such as cross-laterals, patterns, rhythms are proven to be beneficial for making body and brain connections.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate the elements of movement in combination with a variety of locomotor skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate skipping, hopping, galloping, and sliding while transitioning on command (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate smooth transitions between sequential motor skills such as running into a jump (DOK 1-2)
  3. Move using the concepts of space awareness and movement control to run, hop, and skip in different ways in a large group without bumping into others or falling (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify major characteristics of the skills of walking, running, jumping, hopping, and leaping (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is walking different from running?
  2. What activities require one to change movement skill during the activity?
  3. How can one perform a skill without thinking about it?
  4. If you could only master one of the locomotor movements, which one would you choose, and why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals move skillfully under a variety of movement conditions.
  2. Individuals participate skillfully in a variety of games at home that require movement such as playing tag, skipping, or jumping rope.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. The different combinations or ways that movement can be performed are virtually limitless.
  3. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  4. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate control and balance in traveling and weight-bearing activities using a variety of body parts and implements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move to even and uneven beats using various locomotor movements (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create a routine that includes two types of body rolls such as a log roll, egg roll, shoulder roll, or forward roll and a stationary balance position after each roll (DOK 1-4)
  3. Jump rope repeatedly (DOK 1)
  4. Throw, catch, strike, and trap objects while being stationary and also moving toward a partner (DOK 1-3)
  5. Balance objects on various body parts while in various positions (DOK 1-2)
  6. Demonstrate static and dynamic balance on lines or low beams and benches (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to be able to move in both even and uneven rhythms?
  2. What does it mean to have rhythm?
  3. What body parts are involved when one jumps rope?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in a variety of activities such as playing basketball with friends while maintaining control of the body.
  2. Individuals participate successfully in activities that require balance.
  3. Individuals participate in activities such as social dances that require movements to even and uneven beats.
  4. Individuals participate in activities that require throwing and catching with a friend such as playing catch with a football.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Use feedback to improve performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use self feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses as well as modifications that need to be made to improve the performance of a skill or physical movement (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses as well as modifications that need to be made to improve performance of a skill or physical movement (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify methods to keep the brain healthy and ready to learn (DOK 1)
  4. Identify brain-healthy foods (DOK 1)
  5. Describe the role of water as an essential nutrient for the body and brain (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is water essential for the body?
  2. When trying to improve skills, is it better to correct weaknesses or expand on strengths? Why?
  3. Which health habit is most important? Why?
  4. What are the advantages of instructor feedback over self feedback?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals examine the effects of limited water consumption after playing or doing yard work on a hot day.

Nature Of:

  1. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  2. The use of self and instructor feedback identifies strengths and weaknesses to improve performance.
  3. Keeping the brain healthy keeps the body healthy.
  4. Understanding the important relationship between the brain and its impact on physical performance and academic learning is integral in the development of the whole child.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate basic locomotor and nonlocomotor skills, and rhythmic and cross-lateral movements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move in different directions and at high, medium, and low levels in space (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate locomotor movements in a variety of pathways and levels (DOK 1-2)
  3. Travel in forward and sideways directions using a variety of locomotor and nonlocomotor patterns, and change direction quickly in response to a signal (DOK 1-2)
  4. Perform a simple dance step in keeping with a specific tempo (DOK 1-3)
  5. Travel to a variety of rhythms changing time, force, and flow (DOK 1-3)
  6. Manipulate objects such as jump ropes, scarves, hoops, and balls (DOK 1-2)
  7. Balance at different levels on different body parts (DOK 1-2)
  8. Demonstrate both static and dynamic balances (DOK 1-2)
  9. Perform rhythmical movements using small musical aids (DOK 1-3)
  10. Perform a singing dance in a group (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If you were to invent a new locomotor movement, what would it look like, and what would you call it?
  2. Why are dances like the "chicken dance," "bunny hop," and "electric slide" so popular at group gatherings such as wedding receptions?
  3. Why would someone want to know how to do the same things in different ways?
  4. What does it mean to have rhythm? How can one notice whether someone has it?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals move skillfully under a variety of movement conditions.
  2. Individuals successfully ride a two-wheeled bike without training wheels.
  3. Individuals ride a skateboard or skates.
  4. Individuals participate in games that require movement such as playing basketball or tag.
  5. Individuals participate in games that require the use of objects such as jump ropes and balls.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Movement to a beat or pattern activates the brain to facilitate learning.
  3. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate fundamental manipulative skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Standing in place, dribble a ball five times with one's dominant hand (DOK 1)
  2. Throw a ball while stepping forward in opposition (DOK 1)
  3. Strike a stationary object (DOK 1)
  4. Throw an object with an overhand and underhand motion (DOK 1)
  5. Toss a ball to oneself using the underhand throw pattern, and catch it before it bounces (DOK 1)
  6. Catch a thrown large object with both hands (DOK 1)
  7. Kick a stationary object using a simple kicking pattern (DOK 1)
  8. Use body parts and light implements to strike stationary and moving objects (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one get better at throwing a ball?
  2. What is the most effective way to throw a ball?
  3. When is striking used in games and sports?
  4. Is it easier to catch a bigger object or a smaller one? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in activities that require patterned movements such as playing softball or basketball.
  2. Individuals recognize manipulative skills in games and sports by watching sporting events on television.
  3. Individuals recognize manipulative skills in games and sports by watching friends and family members participate in sports.
  4. Individuals demonstrate the skillful use of a variety of manipulatives.
  5. Individuals participate in activities that require the use of manipulatives.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Patterned, rhythmic movement activates the brain to facilitate learning.
  3. Many popular games and sports require the skillful manipulation of an object or objects.
  4. Repetition improves the performance of motor skills.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Establish a beginning movement vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Distinguish between a jog and a run, a hop and a jump, and a gallop and a slide (DOK 1-2)
  2. Respond appropriately to a variety of cues (DOK 1-2)
  3. Recognize personal space, high and low levels, fast and slow speeds, light and heavy weights, balance, and twist (DOK 1-2)
  4. Discuss personal space, general space, and boundaries (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can there be a game with no boundaries?
  2. What are some similarities in different types of locomotor movements?
  3. What makes a jog different from a run?
  4. Why is it important to have personal space?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals perform movements safely on command.
  2. Individuals recognize when to jog, run, hop, jump, gallop, or slide in an activity performed at home.
  3. Individuals recognize when boundaries and personal space are needed in physical activities.

Nature Of:

  1. The knowledge and understanding of concepts of movement and skill mechanics improve performance in a specific skill, and provide the foundation for transfer of skills in a variety of sports and activities.
  2. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate body and spatial awareness through movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Travel within a large group without bumping into others or falling while using a variety of locomotor skills (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate contrasts between slow and fast speeds while using locomotor skills (DOK 1-3)
  3. Create shapes at high, medium, and low levels by using hands, arms, torso, feet, and legs in a variety of combinations (DOK 1-3)
  4. Travel in straight, curved, and zigzag pathways (DOK 1-2)
  5. Move in opposition and alternately (DOK 1-2)
  6. Move synchronously with others (DOK 1-2)
  7. Participate in chase-and-flee activities that include various spatial relationships (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When is moving at a fast speed safer, and when is moving at a slow speed safer?
  2. Which animals use the same movements?
  3. When moving in a group, how do you keep from bumping into each other?
  4. Why is it easier to move in the same direction in which a group is moving than to move against the group?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in games that require movement as a group.
  2. Individuals travel successfully and safely in a variety of activities with a large group of friends and family members such as to the movies or a county fair.
  3. Individuals create letters of the alphabet using their arms, legs, and torso.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Spatial awareness is critical for success in any movement-based activity.
  3. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Locate the major parts of the body

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move specified body parts in response to a variety of sensory cues such as auditory or visual (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify body planes such as front, back, and side (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which body parts are unable to move?
  2. Why do we walk on two feet?
  3. Which are stronger - arms or legs? Why?
  4. What in their arms and legs helps people to move?
  5. When would it be important to be able to change directions quickly?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals play "head, shoulders, knees, and toes" with parents.
  2. Individuals identify body parts correctly.
  3. Individuals identify the front, back, and side of the body.

Nature Of:

  1. Understanding the important relationship between the brain and its impact on physical performance and academic learning is integral in the development of the whole child.
  2. The brain helps the body to learn how to move.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 1. Movement Competence & Understanding in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Travel in a variety of directions using basic locomotor skills, and demonstrate understanding of personal and general space

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move safely in a large group without bumping into others or falling while using locomotor skills (DOK 1-2)
  2. Travel forward and sideways while changing directions quickly in response to a signal (DOK 1-2)
  3. Jump over a stationary rope several times in succession using forward-and-back and side-to-side movement patterns (DOK 1-2)
  4. Move with even and uneven rhythms (DOK 1-2)
  5. Perform movements to the rhythm of music (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which movements are easy to control when in a large group?
  2. Which types of music are more rhythmic?
  3. Which are easier - even or uneven rhythms? Why?
  4. Why is a certain amount of space needed between members of a group while the group is moving?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals travel successfully and safely with family members in a variety of activities such as to a shopping center, country fair, or movie theaters.
  2. Individuals follow a rhythmic pattern when jumping rope with friends.
  3. Individuals participate in games that require movement.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Spatial awareness is critical for success in any movement-based activity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate balance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explore balancing on different body parts at different levels, becoming "like" a statue while making symmetrical and nonsymmetrical shapes (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of under, over, behind, next to, through, right, left, up, down, forward, backward ,and in front of by using the body and an object (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How long could one safely remain in an upside down position?
  2. Why is it easier to stand on two legs than one?
  3. What happens to balance when one spins around?
  4. Why was it easier for small children to crawl first before they learn how to walk?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals successfully ride a tricycle.
  2. Individuals successfully get on and off a moving escalator.

Nature Of:

  1. Individuals who learn to move safely, effectively, and efficiently and feel comfortable and confident in the performance of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.
  2. Individuals who learn the benefits of motor skills are more likely to participate in health-enhancing forms of physical activity throughout life.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Establish goals based on fitness assessment data, and develop, implement, achieve, and monitor an individual health and fitness plan

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop and describe a physical fitness plan that enhances personal health and performance in future leisure and workplace activities (DOK 1-4)
  2. Design and participate in activities that improve all components of health-related fitness (DOK 1-3)
  3. Assess the components of health-related physical fitness (DOK 1-3)
  4. Refine individual fitness goals for each of the five components of health-related physical fitness using research-based criteria (DOK 1-4)
  5. Examine fitness assessment data, and develop a plan to show personal improvement toward achievement of fitness goals, including monitoring personal levels of fitness within each of the five health-related fitness components (DOK 1-4)
  6. Evaluate individual measures of physical fitness in relationship to patterns of physical activity (DOK 1-3)
  7. Plan an extended personal physical fitness program in collaboration with an instructor (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When one experiences a plateau in his or her fitness plan, what are options to consider?
  2. How does one know that a fitness plan is effective?
  3. How might one help a friend to develop personal fitness goals and a fitness plan that fits his or her individual lifestyle?
  4. How does your fitness plan compare to a friend's fitness plan?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals investigate such as by performing an Internet search the economic impact of being healthy.
  2. Individuals use health-related fitness software to compare fitness performance over several years.
  3. Individuals use the Internet to research a physical fitness plan that integrates workplace activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Continually reassess fitness levels in order to establish and work toward meaningful goals.
  2. Regular assessment of physical activity is important for physical well-being.
  3. Be personally responsible for and monitor one's own physical fitness goals.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify community resources to maintain lifelong physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and access physical activity opportunities in the communities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Explain the requirements such as cost involved with participation in a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  3. Evaluate and make wise consumer choices about equipment, products, and programs needed to successfully participate in a wide range of physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  4. Evaluate the availability and quality of fitness resources in the community (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Should insurance companies pay for memberships to health clubs if they will help to prevent chronic diseases?
  2. How do TV commercials and other fitness advertisements try to influence one to buy certain products, and how does one decide on quality fitness facilities, equipment, and activities?
  3. If you could create the ultimate physical activity facility, what would it include, where would it be located, and how much would it cost?
  4. If you lived in a social sphere with absolutely no fitness resources such as facilities, modern equipment, or the Internet, what would you do to reach and maintain optimal levels of health and fitness?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals access resources for physical activity participation throughout a lifetime such as public gyms, parks, and swimming pools.
  2. Individuals use a blog to compare and contrast physical activity opportunities in their community.
  3. Individuals select a piece of sporting equipment, and conduct Internet research and analysis of brands and cost.
  4. Individuals compare the cost of participating in an outdoor adventure sport such as mountain biking and a community-organized sport such as basketball.
  5. Individuals analyze the physical fitness messages in sports and athletic-related television advertisements.

Nature Of:

  1. There are a variety of activities used to improve and maintain lifelong fitness. Participating in these activities likely improves quality of life now and in the future.
  2. Regular participation in physical activity requires access to opportunities in the wider community.
  3. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.
  4. The revolution of health and fitness in the world and our nation is an ongoing evolution.
  5. There are a number of ways to get physical activity outside of school.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Participate regularly in health-enhancing and personally rewarding physical activity outside of physical education

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate willingly in a variety of physical activities appropriate for maintaining or enhancing a healthy lifestyle (DOK 1-3)
  2. Establish personal physical activity goals to accumulate a recommended number of minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity outside of physical education classes on five or more days during the week (DOK 1-3)
  3. Monitor physical activity in a physical activity log through the use of fitness equipment such as a pedometer or heart-rate monitor (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain the benefits of participation in a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate effective time management skills that allow opportunities for physical activity during the day (DOK 1-3)
  6. Demonstrate the ability to monitor and adjust activity to meet personal goals (DOK 1-4)
  7. Participate in a variety of self-selected physical activities, and evaluate the value of each as it relates to personal fitness goals

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How should physical activity be prioritized between work and school?
  2. Why is using a variety of physical activities important?
  3. What are the pros and cons of participating in a variety of physical activities versus specializing in one sport or activity?
  4. If you had a chance to address the U.S. President and Congress about the importance of physical activity, what would you say?
  5. How are your current fitness goals likely to change over time?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals make physical activity a part of an individual lifestyle at home.
  2. Individuals use technology such as computer spreadsheets to create and keep a physical activity diary or log.
  3. Individuals compare and contrast the lifelong wellness benefits of participation in a physical education class versus participating in a high school marching band or a varsity sport.
  4. Individuals appreciate the physical benefits of dancing.
  5. Individuals appreciate the physical benefits of walking or riding a bike instead of driving a car.

Nature Of:

  1. There are a variety of activities used to improve and maintain lifelong fitness. Participating in these activities likely improves the quality of one's life now and in the future.
  2. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.
  3. There are a number of ways to get physical activity outside of school.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the personal, physiological, and fitness benefits of participating in a variety of physical activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Plan and implement an extended personal physical fitness plan in collaboration with an instructor (DOK 1-4)
  2. Explain the relationship among physical activity, nutrition, adequate rest and sleep, and weight management (DOK 1-3)
  3. Participate safely in moderate to vigorous physical activity when conditions are atypical (weather, travel, or injury) (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can individuals who do not meet ideal standards for body weight be fit?
  2. Why are fitness plans not "one size fits all?"
  3. Which physical activities do you enjoy performing in the rain or snow?
  4. Which is more important - good nutrition or adequate sleep? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals engage in wellness behavior such as yoga or meditation that acknowledges its holistic nature.
  2. Individuals use technology such as computer spreadsheets to record activity goals, and monitor progress toward those goals.
  3. Individuals record how much sleep they get every night, and see how it affects their fitness.

Nature Of:

  1. Good health-related fitness is interrelated with nutrition and other personal health habits.
  2. Physical activities can be performed in a variety of conditions that are not typical.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify preferences for lifetime physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in a variety of recreational activities appropriate to a geographical area (DOK 1-2)
  2. Match personal preferences in physical activities with each of the five components of health-related physical fitness (body composition, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, muscular endurance, and muscular strength) (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which component of health-related fitness is most important, and why?
  2. What recreational activities do you and your family participate in weekly, and where do you go to participate?
  3. How does your physical fitness compare to peers from other countries around the world?
  4. What is your favorite adventure sport?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals choose appropriate physical activities at home for wellness such as stretching or jogging.
  2. Individuals use the Internet to learn about the health benefits of physical activities appropriate to their area such as mountain biking, rock climbing, skiing, or hiking.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical activity choices that change throughout a lifetime have a positive effect on the individual's overall health.
  2. Being aware of personal strengths, individual needs, and specific health risks is essential for safely starting a new physical activity.
  3. The selection of activities in which to participate requires knowledge of benefits and outcomes for a wide range of activities.
  4. A variety of physical activities can be performed in any geographical area.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Determine one's responsibility for developing skills, acquiring knowledge, and achieving fitness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create an individual physical activity portfolio that includes: 1. Identifying reasons for choosing a particular physical fitness activity such as have fun, gain flexibility, increase core strength, increase fitness level, and lose weight 2. Reflecting on how and why this activity may differ from now and when one is 25, 40, 55+ (DOK 1-4)
  2. Set realistic fitness goals, and strive to attain them through participation in activities of individual choosing (DOK 1-3)
  3. Maintain a physical activity log for an extended period, documenting progress toward achievement of personal goals (DOK 1-3)
  4. Accumulate a recommended number of minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity outside of physical education class on five or more days during the week (DOK 1)
  5. Design and participate activities that will improve all components of health-related fitness (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do one's age, community, and friends affect the choices about participating in physical activities?
  2. What do you think of your personal fitness assessment results, and what changes should you make in your exercise routine to improve those results?
  3. If you were the editor of a fitness magazine for teenagers, what headlines would you include on your cover page? What hot topics would you include in the magazine?
  4. How are your parents' and grandparents' physical fitness activities similar to or different from your physical fitness activities?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals enjoy participating in physical activity such as regular jogging or walking throughout a lifetime.
  2. Individuals use a computer to monitor their physical activity, and meet guidelines for wellness.
  3. Individuals discuss with family members the physical fitness activities that can be done together as a family.

Nature Of:

  1. An individual's success in and enjoyment of and physical activity choices are affected by changes in geographical and community setting, lifestyles, friends, and age.
  2. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.
  3. It takes commitment and dedication to successfully attain personal goals in fitness and physical activities.
  4. Goal-setting is a critical component of successful behavior change.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Set personal goals for improving health-related fitness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Compare individual physical fitness goals with research-based standards for good health (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify activities that will help to improve cardio-respiratory, muscular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, and body composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the best activities for improving muscular strength?
  2. Why is it important to have flexible muscles?
  3. What are the different components of fitness?
  4. Which physical activities do you enjoy to help to improve cardio-respiratory and muscular endurance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals use the Internet to compare their personal wellness to national trends.
  2. Individuals create a graph to compare fitness test scores to health-related fitness standards.
  3. Individuals research on the Internet national and state standards for good health.

Nature Of:

  1. Setting and working toward fitness goals is critical for positive behavior change.
  2. Everyone can set personal fitness goals for themselves.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate the ability to perform self-paced cardiovascular endurance activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Monitor the intensity of one's heart rate during physical activity (DOK 1)
  2. Identify target heart rate (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why can a peer of the same age and same size have a completely different pace during a cardiovascular activity?
  2. Why is the concept of pace so importance during both aerobic and anaerobic activities?
  3. If you wanted to improve your cardiovascular endurance, what would your training look like?
  4. What is your optimum heart rate for improving your cardiovascular endurance? How can you check and monitor this?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals self-assess their fitness levels in order to make and implement a personal wellness plan.
  2. Individuals use a heart rate monitor to keep activity within the recommended intensity level.
  3. Individuals compare the heart rates of family members during physical activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Cardio-respiratory endurance is extremely important for the prevention of heart disease.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify opportunities in school and in the community for regular participation in physical activity to enhance physical fitness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in self-selected activities that require muscular strength and endurance (DOK 1-3)
  2. Sets realistic fitness goals (DOK 1-3)
  3. Strive to attain fitness goals through participation in physical activity of individual choosing (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should people of different ages have different fitness goals?
  2. How does an individual demonstrate taking responsibility for his or her own physical fitness?
  3. What muscular strength and endurance invention has made the most impact on people's fitness?
  4. What five muscular strength and endurance activities would you do to become physically fit? Would your choices stay the same in order to maintain your fitness level?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals establish physical activity goals relevant to a selected component of fitness such as deciding how many push-ups to do once a week.
  2. Individuals use technology to document and record progress toward fitness goals such as tracking progress with a computer or keeping a journal.
  3. Individuals recognize that there are physical activities available to people of all ages in their community.

Nature Of:

  1. An individual's success in and enjoyment of physical activity choices are affected by changes in geographical and community setting, lifestyles, friends, and age.
  2. Living a healthy lifestyle contributes to a positive self awareness, fewer illnesses, and more opportunities to be active.
  3. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Understand and apply basic principles of training to improving physical fitness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Accurately take a pulse at rest and during exercise (DOK 1)
  2. Develop and describe three short-term and three long-term fitness goals (DOK 1-3)
  3. Correctly differentiate the body's response to physical activities of various exercise intensities (DOK 1-3)
  4. Record and analyze food consumption for one day, and make a plan to replace foods with healthier choices (DOK 1-3)
  5. Explain why dehydration impairs temperature regulation and physical and mental performance (DOK 1-3)
  6. Determine appropriate cardiovascular training zone (DOK 1-2)
  7. Perform flexibility exercises that will stretch particular muscles area for given physical activities (DOK 1)
  8. Identify, select, and participate in activities designed to improve self-diagnosed areas for improvement in health-related fitness components (DOK 1-3)
  9. Engage in moderate to vigorous physical activity at the target heart rate for a minimum of 60 minutes per day (DOK 1-2)
  10. Accurately identify activities that are aerobic and anaerobic (DOK 1-2)
  11. Determine the intensity of personal physical activity using the concept of perceived exertion (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which are more important - short-term goals or long-term goals? Why?
  2. What are all of the different ways that one can determine the intensity of an activity?
  3. How are your physical activity habits similar to or different from the other members of your family? Why are they similar or different? Who in your family benefits the most from their activities?
  4. What would a comprehensive, one-month fitness calendar include? How would this calendar change depending on the weather and available equipment?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals create and implement a fitness plan that reflects current best practices about fitness.
  2. Individuals use a heart rate monitor such as a clock or watch to measure intensity of activity.
  3. Individuals participate safely in a training program. For example, parents sign up their children for YMCA or community center classes.
  4. Individuals use a heart rate monitor such as a clock or watch) to determine whether the intensity of their activity is appropriate.
  5. Individuals create a graph, plotting resting and exercise heart rates over an established period of time.
  6. Individuals discuss with their family some ways they can become more physically active together.

Nature Of:

  1. Knowledge of training principles is critical for developing an effective health-related fitness plan.
  2. Safety in exercise, including warm-up and cool-down techniques, is important to being healthy and injury free.
  3. Physical activity has health and fitness benefits for all ages.
  4. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate understanding of skill-related components of fitness and how they affect physical performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify an exercise that is used to develop agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time, or speed (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create an exercise plan using the six skill-related components to improve performance in a chosen activity (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which component of skill-related fitness do you like the most?
  2. Which component of skill-related fitness is most important, and why?
  3. In which component of skill-related fitness are you the strongest? How can you continue to improve in this component? How can you improve in the other components?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate effectively on a sport team by implementing training methods consistent with the requirements of the activity
  2. Individuals use technology such as a personal computer to monitor an exercise program.
  3. Individuals identify examples of components of skill-related fitness that they use in outdoor activities such as climbing trees.

Nature Of:

  1. Knowledge of skill-related components can influence fitness and physical performance.
  2. Different physical activities require different combinations of agility, balance, coordination, power, reaction time, and speed.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Connect the health-related fitness components to the body systems

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Understand the importance of participation in fitness-enhancing physical activities such as gymnastic clubs, community-sponsored youth sports, or activity clubs (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate appropriate warm-up procedures before participation in vigorous physical activity (DOK 1)
  3. Distinguish healthy balanced meals and snacks designed to enhance the performance of physical activities (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do you prefer participating in organized group activities such as youth basketball leagues or playing in unstructured physical activities such as pick-up basketball games? Why?
  2. If you managed a restaurant, what foods would be on the menu? Why?
  3. Should children be allowed to eat whatever snacks they want? Why or why not?
  4. Should people eat immediately before exercising? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals establish healthy habits for physical activity and nutrition such as tracking fat and caloric intake from nutritional information on food labels.
  2. Individuals keep a computer log to track and analyze a daily diet.
  3. Individuals use the Internet to research healthy, balanced meals.

Nature Of:

  1. A healthy diet and exercise program provides energy for performance and successful participation in recreational and competitive activities.
  2. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.
  3. People have many options to participate in organized physical activities outside of school.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Explain how the health-related components of fitness affect performance when participating in physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the principles of physical fitness: Overload, progression and specificity, frequency, intensity, time, and type (F.I.T.T.) (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify the importance of correct body alignment for performing lower-body stretches (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate an exercise that positively impacts each component of health-related physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  4. Measure and record personal heart rate before, during, and after moderate to vigorous exercise (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What's the difference between the overload principle and "no pain, no gain?"
  2. Do different types of physical activities produce different results?
  3. Which exercise is the healthiest? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals understand the benefits of stretching and warming up before playing a community-organized sport.
  2. Individuals prevent lower back injuries when engaging in exercise.
  3. Individuals complete a video comparison and analysis of safe and unsafe exercises.
  4. Individuals create a video demonstration of exercises for each component of health-related fitness.
  5. Individuals use a watch to monitor their heart rate before, during, and after performing a physical activity.
  6. Individuals watch a video or television, and compare the way professional athletes perform stretches to the way they perform stretches.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy living requires knowledge of the basic principles of physical fitness.
  2. The lack of knowledge regarding safety factors can adversely affect one's ability to participate in physical activity.
  3. Levels of exercise directly influence a person's heart rate, and overall health and fitness.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Recognize the relationship between healthy nutrition and exercise

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Record water intake before, during, and after physical activity (DOK 1)
  2. Identify healthy choices for meals and snacks that help to improve physical performance (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If you left home without your water bottle, how would that impact your choice of physical activity?
  2. If an energy bar and a candy bar have the same number of calories, why is the energy bar considered to be healthier?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals maintain healthy body composition through a lifetime.
  2. When hiking, keep a record of how much water you drink.
  3. Keep a record of how much water you drink every day for a month. Explain days that have more or less water intake.

Nature Of:

  1. Making healthy food choices is an important habit to learn to manage weight.
  2. Drinking water is important for physical health and well-being.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Recognize the benefits derived from regular, moderate, and vigorous physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain how the five health-related fitness components (body composition, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, muscular endurance, and muscular strength) affect ability to participate normally in everyday activities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Compare results of fitness testing to personal health status and ability to perform various activities (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the role of fitness testing in overall wellness?
  2. Which specific activities might affect your body?
  3. How does physical fitness impact successful participation of a variety of activities?
  4. How would you go about improving your physical fitness?
  5. Why would you want to change the results of your physical assessment?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals record and analyze fitness test results using fitness testing software.
  2. Individuals keep a chart of all physical activities, listing the amounts of time for each.
  3. Individuals compare the five health-related physical components to car parts, and explain how they are similar.

Nature Of:

  1. Participation in moderate to vigorous daily activity is important to lifelong health.
  2. It is important to choose activities that will enhance wellness.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the benefits of sustained physical activity that causes increased heart rate and heavy breathing

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain why the body perspires, the heart beats faster and breathing increases when participating in moderate to vigorous physical activity (DOK 1-3)
  2. Recognize that the body will adapt to increased workloads (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe the relationship among the heart, lungs, muscles, blood, and oxygen during physical activity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify several moderate to vigorous physical activities that provide personal pleasure (DOK 1-2)
  5. Identify all activities that children participate in on a regular basis (formal or informal) (DOK 1-2)
  6. Locate heart rate on at least two different pulse points on the body (DOK 1-2)
  7. Discuss how body temperature and blood volume are maintained during physical activity when an adequate amount of water is consumed (DOK 1-3)
  8. Demonstrate the ability to understand the concept of pacing during cardiovascular endurance activity (DOK 1-3)
  9. Explain how the intensity and duration of exercise as well as nutritional choices affect fuel use during physical activity (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which physical activities are the healthiest?
  2. What factors help you to decide why you enjoy an activity or sport?
  3. If you are bored with a current physical activity, how would you choose a new physical activity?
  4. Does your body feel different after you swim than after you run?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals maintain healthy cardiovascular and respiratory system to prevent heart disease.
  2. Individuals participate in a wide range of physical activities over a lifetime such as swimming, bicycling, running, or hiking.
  3. Individuals participate safely in physical activity under a variety of environmental conditions such as high altitude, heat, humidity, or cold.
  4. Individuals use a watch to monitor their heart rate.
  5. Individuals compare the way riding a bicycle makes them feel to the way riding a skateboard makes them feel.
  6. Individuals keep a chart for a month of all physical activities, listing the amount of time for each.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical activity affects heart, lungs, and muscles.
  2. Physical activity affects the way one feels emotionally and physically.
  3. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active life.
  4. Different levels of exercise affect heart rate and overall health and fitness.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Understand that the body is composed of water, muscle, bones, organs, fat, and other tissues

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the location of the lungs and heart (DOK 1)
  2. Identify muscles and fat (DOK 1)
  3. Locate the heart, and feel it beat after moderate to vigorous exercise (DOK 1)
  4. Compare heart rate before, during, and after exercise, and explain that increasing the heart rate during physical activity strengthens the heart muscles (DOK 1-3)
  5. Identify physical activities that cause the heart to beat faster (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do your heart and lungs feel different after you swim than after you run?
  2. If entire bodies were made of fat, how would people move?
  3. What would bodies look like if they had no bones?
  4. Which of your favorite activities do you think contribute most to your heart beating faster?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals understand the role of fitness in preventing chronic disease.
  2. Individuals take a virtual tour of the body, focusing on the lungs and heart.
  3. Individuals prevent heart disease by engaging in aerobic activity such as bicycle riding, or playing tag or basketball.
  4. Individuals use a heart rate monitor to compare heart rate before, during, and after exercise.
  5. Individuals compare body parts to parts of a car or a computer.

Nature Of:

  1. The amount of exercise done does directly influences heart rate and overall health and fitness.
  2. The body is made up of different parts, and each part must be cared for with exercise.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Recognize the importance of making the choice to participate in a wide variety of activities that involve locomotion, nonlocomotion, and manipulation of objects outside of physical education class

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Correctly identify activities and the locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skill involved (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify activities enjoy the most, and connect success with enjoyment of activity (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the relationship between enjoyment and wellness when choosing activities to participate in?
  2. How does the ability to successfully perform various movements encourage increased participation in activities for enjoyment?
  3. If you had to choose one skill, which is the most important - locomotor, nonlocomotor, or manipulative? How would activities change if you were limited to only one or two of these skills?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals identify sports equipment such as skateboards and bicycles that requires locomotor skills.
  2. Individuals value physical activity for a lifetime. For example, they might take an interest in outdoor activities.
  3. Individuals photograph their favorite physical activities.
  4. Individuals watch sports programs on television, and identify activities that involve locomotor, nonlocomotor and manipulative skills.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical activities involve locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills.
  2. The more one performs physical activities, the more success and fun he or she will have doing them.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify good brain health habits

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the fuel requirements of the body during physical activity and inactivity (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify healthy food choices to fuel the body (DOK 1-2)
  3. Determine the proper amount of sleep to get every night (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify changes in the body during exercise and how that makes you feel (DOK 1-3)
  5. Identify feelings resulting from challenges, successes, and failures in physical activity (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are your favorite healthy snacks?
  2. How do you face challenges, overcome failures, and celebrate successes in physical activity?
  3. Do you feel better or worse when you get a lot of sleep at night? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals know the link between good nutrition and physical activity for being healthy.
  2. Individuals ask their parents about healthy foods.
  3. Individuals identify healthy foods on television or billboards.
  4. Individuals experience a wide range of positive emotions and feelings through physical activity.
  5. Individuals create a video demonstrating a wide range of emotions during physical activity.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical activity affects overall health and fitness.
  2. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.
  3. Food choices affect overall health and fitness.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the body's normal reactions to moderate and vigorous physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify basic exercises that help to strengthen various muscles of the body (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify physical activities that require strong muscles (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify and perform specific exercises that can be done to improve the muscular strength and endurance of various muscle groups (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify activities that rely on muscular endurance and muscular strength for someone to be successful (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Would you rather have strong arm and leg muscles, or a strong heart muscle? Why?
  2. How could you work on improving your muscular strength and endurance?
  3. Can one have muscular strength without muscular endurance? What about the other way around? Explain.

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals can prevent injury by maintaining adequate muscular strength and endurance.
  2. Individuals use a computer to find examples of safe exercises to improve muscular strength and endurance.
  3. Individuals create an exercise program that improves their health-related fitness.
  4. Individuals identify equipment in parks and playgrounds that helps to build muscles.

Nature Of:

  1. Regular physical activity contributes to emotional well-being.
  2. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active lifestyle.
  3. Muscular strength and endurance are separate and equally important components of fitness.
  4. The body reacts positively to physical exercise.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Understand that physical activity increases the heart rate, making the heart stronger

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the heart rate as an indicator of moderate to vigorous activity (DOK 1-2)
  2. Sustain moderate to vigorous physical activity for short periods of time (DOK 1)
  3. Identify activities that will increase the heart rate (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which activities can you do for the longest time? Shortest time?
  2. Are there other ways other than checking your heart rate to know that your heart is working hard?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in fitness activities to strengthen their heart.
  2. Individuals identify technology that will allow heart rate monitoring and checking.

Nature Of:

  1. The heart is the most important muscle in the body.
  2. Exercise directly influences heart rate and overall health and fitness.
  3. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active life.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Recognize the positive feelings experienced during and after physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in activities that increase the heart rate (DOK 1)
  2. Participate in activities that require stretching the muscles (DOK 1)
  3. Begin to understand how daily activity and healthy behavior promote overall personal health and safety (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If your body could stretch like a rubber band, which activities would you like to be good at?
  2. What are different ways to make a heart beat faster?
  3. How does running make you feel?
  4. How many different ways can one move his or her body safely?
  5. How do you feel before exercising your body? Immediately after exercising your body? Five minutes after? Ten minutes after?
  6. How do you feel after stretching?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate in fitness activities to have a healthy heart.
  2. Individuals set a base groundwork for lifetime physical fitness such as enjoying outside play.
  3. Individuals compare their heart rate.
  4. Individuals use sports equipment such as bicycles and tricycles that increases their heart rate.

Nature Of:

  1. Levels of exercise directly influence heart rate and overall health and fitness.
  2. Regular physical activity contributes to emotional well-being.
  3. Taking responsibility for one's own health is an essential step toward developing and maintaining a healthy, active life.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate respect for individual differences in physical activity settings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Acknowledge the performance of others, regardless of the outcome (DOK 1-2)
  2. Participate with others in all types of physical activity, regardless of their race or ethnicity, gender, or culture (DOK 1-2)
  3. Practice conflict management and listening skills in a competitive atmosphere (DOK 1-4)
  4. Demonstrate appropriate audience and participant behavior during class performances (DOK 1-2)
  5. Identify areas of personal weakness, and complete an action plan for improvement (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do some attendees at sporting events behave so badly?
  2. What constitutes healthy competition?
  3. What might one do if someone were being bullied because he or she showed poor physical fitness skills?
  4. If peer pressure were nonexistent, how would you determine your choices of physical activity?
  5. How might one peacefully resolve a dispute between friends? Between people who are not friends?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals appreciate the diversity of physical activity experiences in the broader community such as visiting a park and seeing the variety of people engaged in physical activities).
  2. Individuals explain how social networking tools help to and hinder interpersonal relationships.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical education can help individuals from different backgrounds to work together successfully.
  2. Developing self-esteem, resiliency, tolerance, and coping skills support social and emotional health.
  3. In order for all participants and spectators to experience the maximum benefit from games and sports, everyone must demonstrate knowledge and commitment to sportsmanship, rules, and safety guidelines.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate collaboration, cooperation, and leadership skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Contribute to group success through a variety of noncompetitive roles (DOK 1-4)
  2. Initiate responsible behavior, and function independently and cooperatively (DOK 1-4)
  3. Identify and utilize the potential strengths of each individual within a group setting (DOK 1-3)
  4. Influence positively the behavior of others in physical activity settings (DOK 1-4)
  5. Evaluate the role of cooperation and positive interactions with others when participating in physical activity in a variety of settings (DOK 1-4)
  6. Identify leadership skills, perform planned leadership assignments, and assume spontaneous leadership roles (DOK 1-4)
  7. Implement cooperative learning strategies to achieve group goals (DOK 1-4)
  8. Abide by the decisions of officials, accept the outcome of the game, and show appreciation toward participants (DOK 1-3)
  9. Identify contributions of members of a group or team, and reward members for accomplishing a task or goal (DOK 1-3)
  10. Compare and contrast different leadership skills required in a variety of physical activities such as outdoor education and adventure activities, and weight training (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it more important to have the most-skilled players on a team, or to have a team that demonstrates teamwork? Which has more influence on the outcome of a game?
  2. How do you choose to lead or follow in group settings?
  3. How would a team look if all teammates' behavior were the same?
  4. If you could develop the perfect team, what behaviors and traits would your players express?
  5. What are some things one could do to show appreciation of opponents?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate effectively in groups across a variety of settings such as community-sponsored sports leagues.
  2. Individuals describe how technology can aid a coach of a sport team.
  3. Individuals create and follow behavior modification plans for a variety of wellness areas.
  4. Individuals describe how they could use technology to create and monitor an action plan for physical activity.
  5. Individuals create a document outlining proper etiquette for social networking sites.
  6. Individuals react to negative events in healthy ways such as going for a walk after an argument with a friend.
  7. Individuals work effectively with a wide range of personality types in a job setting.
  8. Individuals use technology to show appreciation of fans, officials, and teammates. For example, they might design a website or blog.

Nature Of:

  1. Participation in lifetime sports requires cooperation and leadership skills.
  2. Character can be developed and supported through individual and group activities, influence of positive role models, and involvement in community service and activities.
  3. Individuals can develop positive behavior patterns if they take personal responsibility for their actions.
  4. Cooperation can help to solve difficult problems in groups or teams.
  5. In order for all participants and spectators to experience the maximum benefit from games and sports, everyone must demonstrate knowledge and commitment to sportsmanship, rules, and safety guidelines.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate responsible behavior in group settings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Engage in physical activity with others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Display empathy toward the feelings of others during physical activities (DOK 1-3)
  3. Accept the diversity and individual differences in participation in physical activity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Accept the roles of group members within the structure of a game or activity (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How might one help a teammate with poor physical skills to be a team contributor?
  2. What might one do if he or she were assigned to a team with friends whom he or she doesn't like?
  3. How might one respond if friends didn't want him or her on their team?
  4. How might one try to make a new team member feel welcomed to the team?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate as both a leader and a group member in a variety of settings such as a community-sponsored sports league.
  2. Individuals describe how a social networking site could be used to include others in physical activity such as using social networking sites to organize a game.

Nature Of:

  1. Respect for differences can enhance group performance.
  2. Character can be developed and supported through individual and group activities, influence of positive role models, and involvement in community service and activities.
  3. The development of self-esteem, resiliency, tolerance, and coping skills supports social and emotional health.
  4. Individuals with different levels of physical skill can make a contribution to a group activity.
  5. Physical activities can be useful tools for getting to know other people.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Develop strategies to communicate ideas and feelings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate through verbal and nonverbal behavior cooperation with peers of different backgrounds (DOK 1-4)
  2. Consider the consequences of various choices, and make a responsible decision when confronted with negative peer pressure (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some ways to demonstrate cooperation without actually talking to someone?
  2. How can one nonverbally communicate with teammates to ensure they feel like an important component of the team?
  3. How can one communicate to others that he or she does not want to participate in an activity when confronted by peer pressure?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals work with a variety of people to accomplish group goals.
  2. Individuals compare and contrast digital and face-to-face communication as a method of showing feelings or emotions.

Nature Of:

  1. Communication can take many forms in physical activity settings.
  2. Responsible participants demonstrate positive and appropriate interpersonal skills while participating in physical activity.
  3. There are effective ways to handle peer pressure.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate inclusiveness in and out of classroom settings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Seek out participation with, and show respect for a peer with varying skill ability (DOK 1-3)
  2. Participate in group cooperation games and adventure activities to encourage team building and fun (DOK 1-3)
  3. Make decisions to modify a game to allow all members to participate (DOK 1-4)
  4. Recognize the role of physical activity in getting to know and understand others of similar and different backgrounds (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Are some physical activities better for getting people to interact with each other? Which ones?
  2. What is the value of team-building activities? How can what is learned in team-building activities be applied to other settings?
  3. How could schools support a physically active environment outside of physical education classes?
  4. Why is it important to learn to cooperate with many types of individuals from diverse backgrounds?
  5. How does increasing the number of players in a game affect the outcome?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals recognize and utilize the talents of others when solving a problem.
  2. Individuals describe how technology has impacted adventure activities. For example, helicopters help people to reach remote destinations for rock climbing, hiking, and skiing.
  3. Individuals understand that others of different physical skill levels can make a contribution to a group activity.
  4. Individuals appreciate that physical activities can be useful tools for getting to know other people. For example, community sports leagues are used for social networking.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical education is for people of all abilities.
  2. Responsible participants demonstrate positive and appropriate interpersonal skills while participating in physical activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Recognize diverse skill performance in others and how that diversity affects game, activity, and sport participation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Evaluate individual responsibility in group efforts (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate an acceptance of differences among friends in physical development (DOK 1-3)
  3. Participate in activities that address diversity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Participate in activities with individuals of various skill levels (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why might it be difficult to be the smallest person in class? The largest?
  2. What variety of modifications could be made in a game of basketball, volleyball, or other game to include others of beginning to advanced skills on the same team?
  3. Why are dance and music universal forms of expression?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals work with others from a variety of cultural backgrounds in community sports leagues.
  2. Individuals describe how technology could be used to track individual performance in a team sport. For example, computer spreadsheet programs can be used to keep individual statistics.
  3. Individuals appreciate that others have different levels of skills and physical abilities.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical activity experiences are enriched by the diversity of the participants.
  2. Individuals of different physical skill levels can make a contribution to a group activity.
  3. All participants in a group activity can make a contribution and have responsibilities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Work cooperatively and productively in a group

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Establish and accomplish goals in both cooperative and competitive activities (DOK 1-4)
  2. Identify and define the role of each participant in a cooperative physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  3. Analyze possible solutions to a movement problem in a cooperative physical activity, and come to a consensus on the best solution (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate the ability to resolve conflicts with peers (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What might one do to interact with a friend who refuses to participate in a group problem-solving activity?
  2. How might one include a friend with a disability into the activity?
  3. Do cooperative and competitive activities have similar or different goals?
  4. How might one recommend resolving a dispute between two peers in a game?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals identify and utilize the strengths of group members in a work setting.
  2. Individuals make a video demonstrating conflict resolution through role play.
  3. Individuals visit a rock-climbing gym with friends and determine the best path up a climbing wall.

Nature Of:

  1. Participation in competitive sports and games requires cooperation.
  2. Cooperation between teammates is important for solving complex problems.
  3. Cooperation in physical activities prepares individuals to learn how to cooperate in other activities.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Assess and take responsibility for personal behavior and stress management

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Act in a safe and healthy manner when confronted with negative peer pressure during physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  2. Set a personal goal to improve a skill, and work toward that goal (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe and demonstrate responsible behavior and decision-making while participating in physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  4. Demonstrate respect for the person who is officiating (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does setting goals for physical activities help one to take on personal responsibilities in school work?
  2. Why are officials necessary? What would be the result if there were no officials?
  3. What are some of the ways you have seen others treat officials?
  4. Why is it important to set personal goals?
  5. Are you going to work harder for your goals if you write them out rather than just talk about them? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals follow and respect established guidelines for behavior in a variety of settings.
  2. Individuals use a computer to keep track of personal achievements in physical activities such as running or doing push-ups and pull-ups.

Nature Of:

  1. Taking personal responsibility for healthy behaviors is a foundation for lifetime wellness.
  2. Recognizing that stress is a manageable part of life is important for an individual's emotional development.
  3. Recognizing that performing physical activities can help to manage stress is important.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Choose to participate cooperatively and productively in group and individual physical activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Help others with physical activity challenges (DOK 1-3)
  2. Contribute ideas, and listen to the ideas of others in cooperative problem-solving activities (DOK 1-3)
  3. Acknowledge and accommodate individual differences in others' physical abilities in small-group activities (DOK 1-3)
  4. Officiate an activity, game, or sport (DOK 1-4)
  5. Demonstrate conflict resolution behavior in socially appropriate ways (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How might one interact with a friend who dominates the discussion in a cooperative problem-solving activity?
  2. What are ways to include others who are physically unable to participate due to a disability or injury?
  3. Does your view of talking to officials change when you are an official yourself?
  4. Why is resolving conflicts more important than winning a game?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals solve problems or help to negotiate a conflict among friends.
  2. Individuals participate in a blog with friends, demonstrating positive social behaviors.
  3. Individuals interact with people such as officials, teachers, and coaches who are in leadership roles in a sport or game setting.

Nature Of:

  1. Successful participation in physical activity requires communication and cooperation.
  2. Individuals with different physical skill levels can participate and contribute to activities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify personal activity interests and abilities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Accept responsibility for one's own performance without blaming others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Respond to winning and losing in socially appropriate ways (DOK 1-3)
  3. Develop confidence in a physical activity setting (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do professional athletes sometimes blame others for their performance?
  2. Why do citizens of a city sometimes riot or vandalize things when their team wins the World Series or the NBA Championship?
  3. What is the difference between being confident and being cocky?
  4. What can losing a game or activity allow one to learn that winning can't?
  5. Why do teams sometimes shake hands with the opposition after competing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals can cope with adversity in a healthy manner such as talking with a parent about a problem.
  2. Individuals can use a social networking website to congratulate an opponent after competition.

Nature Of:

  1. Participation in physical activity promotes positive emotional well-being.
  2. Winning is not the most important thing in playing sports.
  3. Losing can be an opportunity to learn.
  4. How one behaves when one wins or loses influences people's perception of him or her.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate positive social behaviors during class

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the positive behaviors of self and others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Congratulate partners, opponents, or team upon conclusion of game or activity (DOK 1-2)
  3. Accept and give constructive feedback to peers (DOK 1-3)
  4. Follow directions, activity-specific rules, procedures, and etiquette with few reminders (DOK 1-2)
  5. Encourage others regularly, and refrain from put-down statements (DOK 1-3)
  6. Ask a partner to participate in a physical activity (DOK 1-2)
  7. Congratulate friends for a well-executed movement (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How should you congratulate someone when he or she wins, and you lose?
  2. When would peer feedback be inappropriate?
  3. How can you give advice to a friend about how to improve at a physical activity?
  4. How does your body feel when you achieve success while working with others?
  5. What is your role in maintaining a positive learning environment that everyone can enjoy?
  6. Why is it important to be polite when you lose?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals acknowledge the efforts of others when they have done something well such as sending a group email acknowledging the efforts of someone to other people.
  2. Individuals describe how they could use technology to assist a friend in learning a skill.
  3. Individuals are gracious winners and losers. For example, they shake the hand of a winning opponent.
  4. Individuals initiate social interaction with someone they don't know in a social situation such as a school dance.
  5. Individuals send an electronic invitation to a friend asking him or her to join them in a physical activity such as playing Frisbee.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical education provides opportunities to reinforce positive social behaviors.
  2. Successful participation in physical activity requires cooperation with others.
  3. Group physical activities should be fun for everyone participating.
  4. How you behave when you win or lose influences how people look at you.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate positive and helpful behavior and words toward other students

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe how positive social interaction can make physical activity with others more fun (DOK 1-2)
  2. Participate in a variety of group settings without distracting behavior (DOK 1-2)
  3. Encourage others by using verbal and nonverbal communication (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should you be polite when playing in a group physical activity?
  2. Why is it important to have good behavior, especially when in a group setting?
  3. Is it easier or harder to work with peers to complete a task? Explain.
  4. How can you encourage someone who is shy to participate in a physical activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals encourage friends or peers.
  2. Individuals brainstorm the forms of technology that have been used to make physical activity more fun.

Nature Of:

  1. Successful participation in physical activity requires cooperation with others.
  2. Group physical activities should be fun for everyone participating.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Work independently and with others to complete work

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and demonstrate acceptable responses to challenges, successes, and failures (DOK 1-3)
  2. Invite others to use equipment before repeating a turn (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify and demonstrate the attributes of being an effective partner or group member in physical activity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Help another student share space effectively (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the most important quality of a good partner, and why?
  2. What makes you a good partner?
  3. What is different about working with someone rather than working by yourself?
  4. What does "help" look like? Express "help" without using words.

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals share limited resources in a way that allows everyone access.
  2. Individuals describe how to share technology with a partner.
  3. Individuals include everyone in an activity such as inviting friends to participate in a game on the weekend.
  4. Individuals can describe a tool that requires more than one person to operate such as a sailboat.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical education provides opportunities to practice and reinforce positive social behaviors.
  2. Physical education provides opportunities to demonstrate responsible social behavior.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Follow the rules of an activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform a simple sequence of movements within given parameters and guidelines (DOK 1-2)
  2. Develop rules for an activity, and participate in the activity while following the rules (DOK 1-4)
  3. Follow the rules for simple games (DOK 1-2)
  4. Accept responsibility for one's behavior in a game situation (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which rules for good behavior would you most want to see in your physical education class, and why?
  2. Why is it important to follow the rules?
  3. What would happen if there were no rules when playing a game?
  4. What game has too many rules?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals use technology to create a rules sheet for a game.
  2. Individuals create games and physical activities that have rules.

Nature Of:

  1. Respect for and commitment to rules is an underlying foundation of game play.
  2. Rules are important for enjoying game play.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate respect for self, others, and equipment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate the characteristics of sharing (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify feelings that result from participation in physical activity (DOK 1-2)
  3. Participate as a leader and follower (DOK 1-2)
  4. Help to manage equipment (DOK 1-2)
  5. Play without interfering with others (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is sharing sometimes difficult?
  2. Would you rather be a leader or a follower? Why?
  3. What would equipment look like if we didn't take care of it? How would that change the games?
  4. How does playing "Simon says" make you feel?
  5. Why is it important to take care of equipment?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals recognize when leading is necessary and when following is necessary such as playing at a friend's house.
  2. Individuals use technology to demonstrate feelings associated with physical activity.
  3. Individuals recognize that taking care of equipment such as toys is an important responsibility.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical education provides opportunities to reinforce healthy social and emotional behaviors.
  2. Physical education provides opportunities to participate in different roles.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate the ability to follow directions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Start and stop on an auditory and visual signal (DOK 1-2)
  2. Follow a simple series of instructions for an activity (DOK 1-2)
  3. Speak at appropriate times (DOK 1)
  4. Follow established class protocols (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to follow directions when participating in physical education?
  2. How is playing "red light, green light" similar to crossing the street?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals follow established rules when engaging in physical activity in settings such as the community pool public playground.
  2. Individuals identify traffic rules that they see on the street.

Nature Of:

  1. Respect for and commitment to rules is an underlying foundation of game play.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Understand the risks and safety factors that may affect participation in physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe and demonstrate the correct use of safety equipment for a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and apply principles from biomechanics and exercise physiology necessary for safe performance of physical activities (DOK 1-4)
  3. Demonstrate proper spotting techniques for all lifts and exercises that require spotting (DOK 1-2)
  4. Inspect equipment and facilities for safety hazards prior to participation (DOK 1-3)
  5. Explain strategies for the prevention of injuries when engaging in physical activity (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Are physical activities becoming safer or more dangerous?
  2. What is the meaning of the saying, "No pain, no gain?" What's the potential harm in it?
  3. What is the importance of fitness and nutrition to safe and efficient practices at home, in school, and at work?
  4. Why is risk a positive aspect of physical activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate safely in lifetime physical activities.
  2. Individuals create a video demonstrating proper form for lifts and exercises.
  3. Individuals make good choices when confronted with a life-threatening situation.
  4. Individuals identify proper safety equipment for different physical activities. For example, they visit a sporting goods store, and compare safety equipment for different physical activities.

Nature Of:

  1. Participation in physical activity requires attention to safety.
  2. Participation in physical activity often involves controlled risk.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate knowledge of safety and emergency response procedures

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in one or more of the following areas: Basic first aid, CPR, lifeguard training, water safety instruction, basic water safety, and automated external defibrillators (AEDs) (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe emergency procedures for a physical education setting (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If you are not trained in first aid or CPR, how can you be of help in an emergency situation?
  2. When did you want to help with a problem, but couldn't?
  3. Why is it important to be trained in first aid, CPR, lifeguarding, water safety, and AEDs?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals assist in efforts to help someone in case of an accident or emergency.
  2. Individuals use technology to practice skills in emergency first aid or CPR. For example, they might take a CPR course at a community center.
  3. Individuals can volunteer to work as lifeguards after they are properly trained.

Nature Of:

  1. Everybody can save a life if given the proper training.
  2. Safety and emergency response procedures are not limited to emergency medical technician (EMT) professionals.
  3. Understanding safety and emergency response procedures is important to the well-being of the community.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Implement safety procedures in the utilization of space and equipment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and participate in safe warm-up and cool-down activities (DOK 1-2)
  2. Review components of safe participation and what constitutes a safe environment (DOK 1-2)
  3. Follow the rules of activities to maintain safe playing conditions (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe safe and unsafe practices for a variety of physical activities (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If you had to skip warming up or cooling down, which one would you skip, and why?
  2. What are ways to avoid injury in basketball? In softball or baseball? In soccer?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate safely in a variety of physical activities.
  2. Using a computer, individuals create a safety information sheet for a favorite physical activity.
  3. Individuals learn safe practices for downhill skiing.
  4. Individuals learn safe practices for climbing.
  5. Individuals learn safe practices for swimming in a public pool.

Nature Of:

  1. Participating in physical activities such as swimming or skating requires attention to safety.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate knowledge of safe practices in a physical activity setting

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Maintain a safe distance from others when using implements (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain safety considerations prior to participation in invasion, net/wall, target, and fielding/run-scoring games (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate the safe use of rackets, bats, and other long-handled implements (DOK 1-2)
  4. Differentiate between safe and unsafe participation and environment (DOK 1-3)
  5. Display safe and responsible behavior while engaging in fitness activities (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If a friend is engaging in unsafe behavior in the weight room, how would you handle it?
  2. How would you explain why the behavior was unsafe?
  3. How would your unsafe behavior affect your friends?
  4. Why do sports have different or similar safety practices?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals learn how to avoid injury when using sports equipment.
  2. Individuals analyze video clips of people engaging in a physical activity to learn safe and unsafe practices.
  3. Individuals learn safe practices for skateboarding or bicycle riding.
  4. Individuals learn that different physical activities such as football, skateboarding, bicycle riding, and skiing have different safe practices.

Nature Of:

  1. Participation in physical activity requires attention to safety.
  2. Athletes understand that not following safe practices for sports can lead to serious personal injuries.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Understand and utilize safe and appropriate warm-up, pacing, and cool-down techniques for injury prevention and safe participation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Prepare a report, bulletin board, or poster on safety factors for a chosen activity (DOK 1-4)
  2. Identify proper warm-up and cool-down techniques (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain that warm-up and cool-down activities prepare the body for physical activity and help to prevent injuries (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify safety rules for the activity and area being used (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Does the time of year matter when cooling down after exercising?
  2. Which warm-up activities are the most effective in preparing the body for movement?
  3. Why is it important to be able to identify safety rules on your own?
  4. Do different sports require more or less warming up than other sports?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals talk to family members about how to participate safely in a physical activity.
  2. Individuals practice proper warm-up and cool-down techniques at home.
  3. Individuals practice warming up when playing soccer with friends.

Nature Of:

  1. Safe participation in physical activity requires an individual to manage risks.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify and describe the benefits, risks, and safety factors associated with regular participation in physical activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify proper safety equipment for various physical activities such as riding a bicycle, climbing, or playing hockey (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe the correct form to push, pull, and lift heavy objects (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify appropriate footwear and clothing for safe participation in various activities (DOK 1)
  4. Develop with an instructor's help the safety rules for physical education, and create a list or poster (DOK 1-3)
  5. List the benefits of following and risks of not following safety procedures and rules associated with physical activity (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is a possible risk of not following rules when swimming?
  2. When and for which activities should helmets be mandatory, and when should they be optional?
  3. How should people lift heavy objects?
  4. What would be your number-one safety rule? Why?
  5. Why do football players need to wear a lot of protective gear, and basketball players don't?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals can prevent lower-back injuries by taking proper precautions when playing with friends.
  2. Individuals select proper footwear at a store for when they participate in physical activity. For example, they might buy basketball shoes versus cleats.
  3. Individuals use technology to create a poster about safety.
  4. Individuals look at the equipment in a sporting good store and determine its safety benefits.
  5. Individuals look at safety rules for a sport on the Internet.

Nature Of:

  1. Injuries can be prevented through the use of proper movement technique.
  2. Clothing and footwear are important considerations for safe participation in physical activity.
  3. Warm-up and cool-down activities are important for safe participation in physical activity.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Apply rules, procedures ,and safe practices to create a safe school environment with little or no reinforcement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Maintain safety within personal space while using implements (DOK 1-2)
  2. Follow safety rules in the gymnasium and on the playground (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is a safety rule for running?
  2. If you could implement only one safety rule for the gymnasium, what would it be?
  3. How are safety rules the same for the playground and gym? How are they different?
  4. Why is personal space even more important when you are using implements?
  5. What is the proper way to play with a baseball bat?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals avoid injury when participating in a wide range of physical activities.
  2. Individuals make time for participation in activities outside of school hours.
  3. Individuals watch a video, and identify good safety practices.

Nature Of:

  1. Paying attention to safety can prevent injuries.
  2. Understanding safety rules for games can lead to greater enjoyment when playing them.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Develop movement control for safe participation in games and sports

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize appropriate safety practices in general space by throwing balls only when others are not in the direct line of the throw (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate the ability to follow verbal and nonverbal instruction (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If nonviolence and respect for others is so important, why do we play dodgeball?
  2. Why does a person need to know how to follow directions if the directions are not given verbally?
  3. Why should you not throw balls at other people?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals avoid injuring others when participating in physical activity.

Nature Of:

  1. Following safety rules can prevent injury in physical education.

Content Area: Physical Education
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Physical Education

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Apply safe practices, rules, and procedures

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate safety awareness when purposefully using materials (DOK 1-2)
  2. Participate in activity without colliding into other students (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify proper footwear for physical education (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What's the value of having special footwear for physical education?
  2. Why should shoes be tied tight?
  3. Why should exercise equipment be put away after it is used?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals participate safely in a wide range of physical activities.
  2. Individuals visit a shoe store to identify proper footwear.
  3. Individuals observe people crossing a street to see how they are aware of their physical space and do not bump into each other.

Nature Of:

  1. Paying attention to safety guidelines can prevent injuries.