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New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Comprehensive Health - All

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze the benefits of a healthy diet and the consequences of an unhealthy diet

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use nutritional evidence to describe a healthy diet and an unhealthy diet (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and describe the relationship among healthy eating, physical activity, and chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, type-2 diabetes, hypertension, and osteoporosis (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe the importance of eating a variety of foods to balance nutrient and caloric needs (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain the effects of disordered eating and eating disorders on healthy growth and development (DOK 1-3)
  5. Analyze the relationship between eating behavior and metabolism (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you define "healthy eating"?
  2. If everyone had a healthy diet, how would diseases be impacted?
  3. Can frequent exercise make up for poor food habits (or vice versa)? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Nutritionists evaluate the diets and eating behaviors of others, and recommend strategies for improving health.
  2. Restaurants and food companies respond to concerns among consumers about healthful food choices, and create menus and products to address those concerns.
  3. Community leaders advocate for nutritious foods in public programs such as food banks and school lunch programs.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthful living requires an individual to act on available information about good nutrition, even it means breaking comfortable habits.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Analyze how family, peers, media, culture, and technology influence healthy eating choices

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze advertising claims for nutrition supplements and weight-loss products (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze how family, peers, and the media influence food choices (DOK 1-4)
  3. Analyze the influence of media on the selection of products and services related to weight management (DOK 1-4)
  4. Analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, and media on body image and the subsequent effects on eating behavior (DOK 1-4)
  5. Analyze how a positive or a negative body image can influence eating behavior (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What might a media campaign to promote healthy eating look like?
  2. If there were no food advertising, how might your diet be different?
  3. How does body image affect behavior?
  4. How can you determine which claims about nutrition supplements and weight-loss, if any, are true? What criteria can you use, and what supporting evidence should you seek?
  5. How can personal economics influence food choices?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Diet analysis software helps people to create healthy diets by providing extensive nutritional information.
  2. School and community policies such as replacing soda machines with water and high-quality juices can influence healthy or unhealthy eating.
  3. Food availability subsidies, farm policy, food advertising and cultural and media messages influence nutritional choices.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthful living requires an individual to critically analyze all available information about good nutrition, and make healthy, informed choices based on that information.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate ways to take responsibility for healthy eating

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe and explain how current federal nutrition standards and guidelines are useful in planning a healthy diet (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use information on food labels to make healthy eating choices (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate how to balance caloric intake with caloric expenditure to maintain, gain, or reduce weight in a healthy manner (DOK 1-3)
  4. Set a goal to improve one's personal food choices that lead to a healthier diet (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can you use "Nutrition Facts" labels and federal nutrition standards and guidelines such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans or My Pyramid to help to make nutritious food choices as well as establish healthy eating habits?
  2. From a health perspective, how can you become a "wise" shopper?

Relevance & Application:

  1. "Nutrition Facts" labels provide information that aid in making healthy choices.
  2. Current research on how heredity and individual metabolism impacts caloric needs is revolutionizing the wellness industry.
  3. Specific diet plans found in popular magazines, books, Internet sites, and infomercials should be carefully evaluated for health benefits or consequences.

Nature Of:

  1. Dietary requirements vary for individuals based on age, activity level, metabolism, and health.
  2. Healthy eating can influence physical, emotional, and mental health in a variety of positive ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Use a decision-making process to make healthy decisions about relationships and sexual health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Define the characteristics of healthy relationships, dating, committed relationships, marriage, and family (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze the possible consequences of early sexual activity and the emotional, mental, social, and physical benefits for delaying sexual activity (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe how a person can choose to abstain from sexual activity at any point in time, even after having engaged in prior sexual activity (DOK 1-4)
  4. Analyze factors that influence the choice, use, and effectiveness of contraception, including the availability of contraceptive methods (DOK 1-4)
  5. Explain the difference between risk avoidance and risk reduction and strategies one can utilize for each as it relates to STD's and pregnancy. (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze when it is necessary to seek help with or leave an unhealthy situation (DOK 1-4)
  7. Analyze risks of sharing personal information thru modern technology (DOK 1-4)
  8. Evaluate how HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) or pregnancy could impact life goals (DOK 1-4)
  9. Examine the responsibilities of parenthood (DOK 1-4)
  10. Appraise internal and external influences and pressures to become sexually active, and demonstrate strategies to resist those pressures (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can a personal decision to become sexually active affect one's future goals and options?
  2. How does one know when one is ready to become a parent?
  3. What kind of work is involved in being a parent?
  4. In order to achieve lifelong sexual and reproductive health, what should I plan for?
  5. Why are relationships important?
  6. How do we learn to understand and respect diversity in relationships?
  7. How do we know when a relationship is not worth saving?
  8. How do we know when someone is being truthful online?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Family structures, values, rituals, and traditions impact decisions regarding health, and vary from individual to individual, family to family, and culture to culture.
  2. Various factors often create discrepancies between actual and perceived social norms related to sexual activity among teenagers.
  3. Cultural and religious beliefs, popular trends and fads, and current and emerging technological advances influence sexual and reproductive health.
  4. Analyze the physical, economic, emotional, social, intellectual, and cultural demands of raising a child.
  5. Culture, media, and other people influence perceptions about body image, gender roles, sexuality, attractiveness, relationships, and sexual orientation.
  6. Prenatal exposure to alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, infections, and environmental hazards may affect the incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome, low birth weight, and disabilities.

Nature Of:

  1. Decision-making can be affected by a variety of influences that may or may not be in a person's best interest.
  2. Tolerance, appreciation, and understanding of individual differences are necessary in order to establish healthy relationships.
  3. Technological advances continue to provide increased opportunities to develop relationships anytime and anyplace with a worldwide audience.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Support others in making positive and healthful choices about sexual activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate ways to encourage friends to remain sexually abstinent or return to abstinence if sexually active (DOK 1-3)
  2. Communicate the benefits of avoiding or reducing the risk of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV (DOK 1-4)
  3. Communicate the importance of HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and counseling to those who are sexually active (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why would someone engage in intimate behaviors without first having the emotional safety to talk about it?
  2. What support do you need to assist you in making healthy decisions about sexual activity?
  3. Why would a teenager choose to delay sexual activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Cultural and religious beliefs, popular trends, fads, and current and emerging technological advances influence sexual and reproductive health.
  2. Advocating to others at school or in the community regarding positive and healthful choices about sexual activity creates an environment of open communication.

Nature Of:

  1. Leadership and advocacy to promote personal and community wellness can impact the immediate community and society as a whole.
  2. Reliable personal and professional resources are available to assist with sexual and reproductive health problems.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

6. Develop and maintain the ongoing evaluation of factors that impact health, and modify lifestyle accordingly

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze the role of personal responsibility in maintaining and enhancing personal, family, and community wellness (DOK 1-4)
  2. Debate the social and ethical implications of the availability and use of technology and medical advances to support wellness (DOK 3-4)
  3. Explain the importance of health screenings, immunizations, checkups, i and other examinations that are necessary to maintain overall health and wellness (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Would one still need a doctor if one always ate "healthy," and always maintained an active lifestyle?
  2. What could happen if everyone's medical records were open for public viewing?
  3. How does one's neighborhood impact one's health?
  4. What are the obstacles to accessing health care?
  5. Should medical research focus on promoting wellness or finding cures for known diseases?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals who lack access to health care and adequate wellness information may be at risk for developing illnesses.
  2. Socioeconomic status and educational attainment impact health.
  3. Public health policies are designed to protect the health of a community and can include laws pertaining to air quality, food protection, solid waste management, hazardous waste management, and water quality.
  4. Behavioral and environmental factors can contribute to major chronic diseases.

Nature Of:

  1. Quality of life is linked to our personal investment in health and wellness.
  2. Self-evaluation and self-regulation contribute to well-being.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Describe the physical, emotional, mental, and social benefits of sexual abstinence, and develop strategies to resist pressures to become sexually active

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to anticipate and minimize exposure to situations that pose a risk to sexual health (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to refuse pressure to engage in unwanted verbal, physical, and sexual activity and advances (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain why individuals have the right to refuse sexual contact (DOK 1-4)
  4. Seek support to be sexually abstinent (DOK 1-4)
  5. Develop personal standards for dating situations (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do health practices in adolescence affect lifelong health?
  2. What is the difference between affection, love, commitment, and sexual attraction?
  3. What characteristics do you find most appealing in a dating relationship?
  4. Why would you choose to be sexually abstinent?
  5. What advice would you give to a friend who is being pressured to become sexually active?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Contrasting historical analyses of different societal mores related to sexual activity with today's environment provides information on how a culture perceives and values sexual relationships.

Nature Of:

  1. Learning about sexuality and discussing sexual issues is critical for health.
  2. External pressures and opportunities that present themselves may influence a person's sexual decision-making and activity.
  3. Taking responsibility for one's own health requires verbal and nonverbal communication skills that can help to resist unwanted sexual activity and support positive health choices.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Analyze how certain behaviors place one at greater risk for HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and unintended pregnancy

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the benefits and effectiveness of abstinence in preventing HIV, STDs, and unintended pregnancy (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain the benefits and effectiveness and potential side effects of contraceptives in reducing the risk of HIV, other STDs, and unintended pregnancy (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe the risk relationship between using alcohol and other drugs and sexual activity (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate peer resistance skills and personal boundary behavior (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. To what extent can we keep ourselves disease-free?
  2. Why might a person be more likely to engage in risky behaviors such as sexual activity when under the influence of alcohol or other drugs?
  3. What advice would you give to a friend who is being pressured to do something he or she does not want to do?
  4. Why is it important to stand up for what you believe?
  5. Why do some countries or cultures have higher rates of unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases than others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Age, gender, health history, religious beliefs, cost, and product reliability influence the use of various methods of contraception.
  2. Policies or practices in different cultures impact the number of unintended pregnancies.

Nature Of:

  1. Current and future personal wellness is dependent on a person's ability to apply health-related concepts and skills in everyday situations.
  2. Standing up for yourself and what you believe can affect your physical, mental, emotional, and social health.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Describe the signs and symptoms of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the signs, symptoms, and transmission of common STDs, including HIV, HPV, and chlamydia (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain that some STDs are asymptomatic (DOK 1-2)
  3. Summarize which STDs can be cured, prevented by vaccine, and be treated (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How would I identify reliable sources of medically accurate information?
  2. Why is it important to seek medical attention if you think you may have been exposed to an STD?
  3. How can you find more information about STDs?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Medical advances for the prevention and treatment of STDs continue to evolve.
  2. Society has viewed persons diagnosed with STDs differently throughout history.

Nature Of:

  1. Current and emerging diagnostic, prevention, and treatment strategies can help people to live healthier and longer lives than ever before.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Promote and enhance health through disease prevention

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain contributing factors to health status (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze the relationship among poor eating habits, inactivity, tobacco and alcohol use, and health status (DOK 1-4)
  3. Explain the body's response to disuse and other stressors (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain how the immune system functions to prevent and combat disease (DOK 1-3)
  5. Describe the potential health consequences of popular fads or trends (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are some people healthier than others?
  2. What might happen if there were a cure for cancer and genetic diseases?
  3. When might stress be beneficial?
  4. Why do some people get sick more than others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Popular fads or trends have potential social and health consequences.
  2. Advances in genetics and science influence health outcomes.
  3. Global travel affects disease transmission and outbreaks.

Nature Of:

  1. Health and wellness is a personal and a global issue dependent on behavior choices, scientific advances, and ever-changing information.
  2. Decisions made today may affect personal health in the future.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze factors that influence healthy eating behaviors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze how family, peers, media and culture influence food choices (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze how social and cultural messages about food and eating influence nutrition choices (DOK 1-4)
  3. Analyze the influence that adults and role models have on one's food choices (DOK 1-4)
  4. Analyze internal influences on one's food choices (DOK 1-4)
  5. Recognize that people with eating disorders may need professional help (DOK 1)
  6. Describe the signs, symptoms, and consequences of common eating disorders (DOK 1-2)
  7. Identify internal and external influences on one's body image (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What internal and external influences affect your eating choices?
  2. How do family habits or traditions, peers, role models, cultural heritage, and societal norms affect food choices?
  3. What would happen if your body did not tell you when you were hungry or full?
  4. Why do people have eating disorders?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Cultural perspectives influence food choices.
  2. Making unhealthy foods more expensive is meant to influence food choices.
  3. A variety of strategies are used to market food products to individuals and these strategies will change as technology advances.
  4. Portion sizes have increased over time.
  5. It is important to recognize signs or symptoms of eating disorders and seek treatment.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthful living requires an individual to analyze all available information about good nutrition and to use such information to make healthy choices, even when doing so means breaking comfortable habits.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate the ability to make healthy food choices in a variety of settings

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop strategies for making healthier food and beverage choices in a variety of settings such as eating out, at home, with friends, or at school (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate interpersonal skills that deal with negative influences on healthy eating (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is a healthy weight?
  2. How can a healthy diet for one person be unhealthy for another?
  3. Why do people on restrictive diets often end up gaining more weight?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Food choices have an impact on the environment.
  2. Individuals must determine for themselves which food choices lead to their optimal health and weight goals.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy eating can influence physical, emotional, and environmental health.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Compare and contrast healthy and unhealthy relationships (family, peer, and dating)

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the characteristics of healthy relationships, and discuss factors that support and sustain them (DOK 1-4)
  2. Explain the purpose of friendship in different stages of the life cycle, and describe how friends can support one another in making healthy decisions (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe effective strategies for dealing with difficult relationships with family members, peers, and boyfriends or girlfriends (DOK 1-3)
  4. Describe the emotional effects of breaking up in a dating relationship (DOK 1-3)
  5. Explain the role of dating in personal growth (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is "dating"?
  2. How might "unhealthy" family and peer relationships influence future dating relationships?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various cultures date and select life partners differently.
  2. Technological advances provide increased opportunities to develop relationships anytime and anyplace with a worldwide audience.
  3. Healthy relationships require many things of both people.

Nature Of:

  1. Understanding the various aspects of human relationships assists in making healthy choices.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Analyze the internal and external factors that influence sexual decision-making and activity

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe a variety of external influences such as parents, the media, culture, peers, and society that affect sexual decision-making and sexual activity (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe how internal influences such as curiosity, hormones, interests, desires, fears, and feelings affect sexual decision-making and activity (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe how personal, peer, and family values influence decisions about sexual and reproductive health (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze the discrepancies between perceived and actual sexual activity (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do I discern media and cultural messages that support optimal health versus those that undermine optimal health regarding sexual decision-making and activity?
  2. How does what my family thinks about sexual activity affect me?
  3. How does what my friends and peers think about sexual activity affect me?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The internet and other forms of media influence sexual decision-making.
  2. Families, peers, the media, culture, and society influence what a person thinks about people who have infectious or chronic diseases, such as HIV infection, AIDS, and cancer.
  3. Families, peers, the media, culture, and society influence what one thinks about attractiveness and relationships.

Nature Of:

  1. External factors and situations that present themselves as well as internal factors?such as hormones, curiosity, desire, attraction, fear, and other feelings?may influence a person's healthy decision-making and behavior.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Define sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the effects of HIV infection on the body (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain how HIV is and is not contracted (DOK 1-2)
  3. Define common STDs (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it safe to be around people who are infected with HIV? Why or why not?
  2. Why is HIV/AIDS generally thought to be more dangerous than other STDs?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The human immunodeficiency virus affects the body's immune.
  2. Universal precautions are recommended for anyone who comes into contact with bodily fluids.

Nature Of:

  1. Tolerance, appreciation, and understanding of the conditions of others demonstrate humanity and empathy.
  2. There are many different kinds of sexually transmitted diseases. Some can be treated and/or cured and some cannot, and all can lead to serious health complications.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Access valid and reliable information, products, and services to enhance healthy eating behaviors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Distinguish accurate nutrition information from inaccurate information (DOK 1-2)
  2. Evaluate the nutrition information on food labels to compare products (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate the ability to access people or sources of accurate information and reliable advice regarding healthy eating (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Who has the final say on what is "healthy" food?
  2. If food is labeled with nutritional information all over the country, why do some states have higher rates of obesity?
  3. Does posting nutritional information on products and in restaurants change behavior?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Advertisements are designed to sell products not necessarily to provide accurate health information.
  2. Family members, health professionals, organizations, books, dietary guidelines,
  3. "Nutrition Facts" labels help to identify healthy food choices and eating behaviors.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to discriminate between false advertising and accurate information is key for lifelong healthy food choices

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Access valid and reliable information regarding qualities of healthy family and peer relationships

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the benefits of healthy relationships (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe how peer relationships may change during adolescence (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does it feel when a friendship ends?
  2. How do I cope with conflict within my family or with my friends?
  3. How do healthy relationships contribute to overall wellness?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Analyze how technological advances provide increased opportunities to develop relationships
  2. Discuss the various ways we communicate with one another and how that impacts human relationships
  3. Relationships affect your physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being.

Nature Of:

  1. Understanding the various aspects of human relationships assists in making healthy choices

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Comprehend the relationship between feelings and actions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify sexual feelings common to young adolescents, and differentiate between having sexual feelings and acting on them (DOK 1-3)
  2. Discuss possible physical, social, and emotional impacts of adolescent sexual activity (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe behaviors that place one at risk for HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), or unintended pregnancy (DOK 1-3)
  4. Describe the need to have clear expectations, boundaries, and personal safety strategies (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is sexual health a difficult topic to discuss?
  2. How do I figure out my personal beliefs about sexual activity?
  3. What do you need to help you effectively communicate with a trusted adult about sexual and reproductive health?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Attitudes about sexuality are influenced by families, peers, and the media
  2. Relationships with friends and family members can influence decision-making in positive and negative ways.

Nature Of:

  1. Learning about sexuality and discussing sexual issues is critical for health.
  2. There are many physical, emotional, and social implications associated with engaging in sexual activity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Analyze how positive health behaviors can benefit people throughout their life span

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the concepts of the food pyramid such as nutrient-rich foods being balanced with physical activity (DOK 1-2)
  2. Analyze the short and long-term benefits and consequences of healthy eating and physical activity (DOK 1-4)
  3. Summarize personal strategies for reducing sun damage as well as hearing and vision damage (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain the benefits of good hygiene practices for promoting health and maintaining social relationships (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the most important determinants of mortality?
  2. Why are there so many health problems in the U.S. caused by poor nutrition and inactivity in spite of available information?
  3. What are the different energy requirements of different ages and different activity levels?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Physical activity improves physical, mental and cognitive health.
  2. Sunscreens come in different protection levels to accommodate individual skin-types and burn rate.

Nature Of:

  1. People who eat a healthy diet, are physically active and do not smoke have a greatly reduced incidence of morbidity and mortality.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate the ability to engage in healthy eating behaviors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify eating behaviors that contribute to maintaining good health (DOK 1-2)
  2. Make a personal commitment to improve food choices (DOK 1-4)
  3. Choose healthy foods and beverages instead of less healthy foods and beverages (DOK 1-2)
  4. Use current federal nutrition standards and guidelines to plan healthy meals and snacks (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate the ability to identify and select healthy from unhealthy foods (DOK 1-3)
  6. Summarize how to request politely foods that are more nutritious (DOK 1-3)
  7. Analyze the difference between disordered eating and eating disorders (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would happen if the school only served healthy meals and healthy beverages, including vending machine choices?
  2. If broccoli were deep-fried, would it still be nutritious?
  3. Is sugar bad? Why, or why not?
  4. Why do people tend to eat too much sugar, fat, and salt?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Eating healthy involves good decision-making skills, access to accurate information about healthy eating, and access to healthy foods.
  2. As the body matures, the amount of food and key nutrients change to support healthy systems and growth.
  3. Food storage and processing can result in chemical changes that affect the nutritional value of food.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy eating is a personal responsibility and is challenged by the choices available to us.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Explain the structure, function, and major parts of the human reproductive system

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Summarize the anatomy of the reproductive system, including functions of the male and female reproductive systems (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe the relationship of conception to the menstrual cycle (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain that after fertilization, cells divide to create a fetus and embryo that grows and develops inside the uterus during pregnancy (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is optimal growth and development?

Relevance & Application:

  1. In nature, different animals have different gestation cycles.

Nature Of:

  1. There are many influences on the physical, social, and emotional changes that occur at puberty, including hormones, heredity, nutrition, and the environment.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Describe the physical, social, and emotional changes that occur at puberty

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Discuss why puberty begins and ends at different ages for different people, and that variance is considered normal (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify personal hygiene practices and health and safety issues related to puberty (DOK 1)
  3. Determine factors that influence the purchase of health care products and the use of personal hygiene practices (DOK 1-4)
  4. Discuss how changes during puberty affect thoughts, emotions, growth patterns and behaviors

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are some aspects of puberty "embarrassing"?
  2. What is "normal"?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Heredity influences growth and development.
  2. The onset age of puberty has changed over time due to factors that include changes in nutrition, access to medical care, and exposure to chemicals in the environment.

Nature Of:

  1. Tolerance, appreciation, and understanding of individual differences are critical during times of change.
  2. There are many influences on one's physical, social, and emotional development at puberty, including hormones, heredity, nutrition, and the environment.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills needed to discuss personal health problems to establish and maintain personal health and wellness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify appropriate adults with whom to discuss personal health problems (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate appropriate ways to talk to someone such as a parent or health care provider about personal health problems, issues, and concerns (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What could happen if I did not tell someone about my health condition?
  2. Why is it important to ask for what I need?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Clearly communicating with a health care provider regarding needs is critical to receiving the best care possible.
  2. Web-based health information sites can be useful, but should be examined for accuracy to avoid misinformation.

Nature Of:

  1. Interpersonal communication about health conditions and concerns is critical for prevention of disease and maintaining good health.
  2. Individuals need support when making decisions about when and with whom to discuss healthcare questions or concerns.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Comprehend concepts, and identify strategies to prevent the transmission of disease

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Differentiate between communicable and non-communicable diseases, including asthma, AIDS, epilepsy (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe how the body fights germs and diseases naturally, with medicines, and through immunization (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe ways to prevent the spread of germs that cause infectious diseases through food, water, air, blood, and touch (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe the effects of HIV infection on the body (DOK 1-2)
  5. Explain how HIV is and is not contracted (DOK 1-2)
  6. Explain that it is safe to be a friend of someone who has a disease or conditions that cannot be easily transmitted such as asthma, epilepsy, or AIDS (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why did people die earlier in the early 1900s?
  2. How can you avoid contact with germs? How can you help your body fight germs? How can you be sure not to spread germs?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Good hygiene, such as handwashing, deters the spread of germs.
  2. Technological advances assist with disease tracking and prevention.

Nature Of:

  1. Many strategies exist to prevent transfer of germs and disease transmission and to control the severity of illnesses.
  2. Tolerance, appreciation, and understanding of the conditions of others demonstrate humanity and empathy.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate the ability to set a goal in order to enhance personal nutrition status

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Set a goal to improve food choices based on appropriate nutritional content, value, and calories (DOK 1-4)
  2. Explain the importance of eating a variety of foods from all the food groups (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify healthy foods (including snacks) in appropriate portion sizes (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can your personal goals for healthy eating work within the choices of food available to you at home and at school?
  2. If two foods have the same amount of calories, are they equally healthy for you? Why or why not?
  3. Do all foods help your body in the same ways? Why or why not?
  4. How can you tell if a portion size is appropriate?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Healthy foods provide nutrients that in turn provide you energy for daily activities.
  2. Nutrients are necessary for good health and proper growth and development.
  3. Different foods provide different nutrients. To get all the nutrients you need, it is necessary to eat a balanced diet such as eating a variety of healthy foods within and across the major food groups.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy eating is a personal responsibility and is affected by the choices available to us.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Examine the connection between food intake and physical health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain that both eating habits and level of physical activity affect a person's overall well-being and ability to learn (DOK 1-2)
  2. Summarize body signals that tell people when they are hungry and when they are full (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do most people feel better after they eat?
  2. Why do some people eat even if they are not hungry?
  3. How can you increase physical activity during the school day?
  4. What happens to your body and brain if you eat too much or not enough?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Daily physical activity can make a person feel more awake, better able to concentrate, and full of energy.
  2. Hunger signals tell us when to eat, and when to stop.

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy food choices and exercise can positively affect brain function, and physical and emotional health
  2. Eating healthy portions when you are hungry and stopping when you are full can help you meet your energy needs and avoid overeating.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Explain that the dimensions of wellness are interrelated and impact personal health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the physical, social, and emotional dimensions of personal health and wellness and how they interact (DOK 1-4)
  2. Define wellness (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is wellness?
  2. What are the benefits and consequences of our choices in terms of wellness?
  3. Why does wellness sometimes require that we make changes to our current behaviors, relationships, or actions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Personal behaviors, such as eating healthy and engaging in physical activity, have a long term effect on wellness.

Nature Of:

  1. Current and future personal wellness is dependent upon applying health-related concepts and skills in everyday lifestyle behaviors.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate the ability to make and communicate appropriate food choices

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe a variety of nutritious breakfast foods (DOK 1)
  2. Plan a meal based on the food groups (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the concepts of eating in moderation (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate refusal skills in dealing with unhealthy eating situations (DOK 1-3)
  5. Identify how family, peers, and media influence healthy eating (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is a healthy portion size?
  2. What kinds of foods would be best for you to eat for breakfast? Why?
  3. How can students eat a balanced diet if food choices are limited at school and home?
  4. How can you keep a friend if you disagree about food choices?
  5. How can the things that you see on television or in magazines influence your feelings and choices about food?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Eating healthy portions when you are hungry and stopping when you are full can help you meet your energy needs and avoid overeating.

Nature Of:

  1. Messages about healthy eating are abundant and require accurate information to discern them.
  2. Making responsible food choices is dependent on personal responsibility and decision making skills.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify eating and drinking behaviors that contribute to maintaining good health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the importance of choosing healthy foods and beverages (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify the benefits of drinking plenty of water (DOK 1)
  3. Describe the benefits of eating breakfast every day (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify a variety of healthy snacks (DOK 1)
  5. Understand that the body exhibits signals that tell people when they are hungry and when they are full (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do many people claim that breakfast is the most important meal of the day?
  2. Why is it important to pay attention to your body when it feels hungry or full?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Water is essential for optimal body functioning.
  2. A healthy diet, which includes eating breakfast, helps provide the energy you need to move, think clearly, and solve problems, throughout the day.

Nature Of:

  1. A healthy, balanced diet includes eating appropriate portion sizes from multiple food groups throughout the the day.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Recognize basic childhood chronic diseases

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify problems associated with common childhood chronic diseases or conditions, including but not limited to asthma, allergies, type-1 diabetes, and epilepsy (DOK 1-3)
  2. Communicate concern to an appropriate adult when a person is having an allergic reaction or difficulty breathing (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can you tell if someone is having an allergic reaction?
  2. What actions might you take if you saw a person who was having trouble breathing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Food allergies are common and it is important to understand how to decrease exposure to allergens..
  2. If someone is having difficulty breathing or is not responding, it is important to know how to seek help.

Nature Of:

  1. Chronic diseases and allergies can be effectively managed.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Eating a variety of foods from the different food groups is vital to promote good health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Categorize foods into the major food groups (DOK 1)
  2. Identify a variety of foods in each of the food groups that are healthy choices (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify foods and beverages that are high in added sugar, and generate examples of healthy alternatives (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes some foods healthy and other foods unhealthy?
  2. Why is it helpful to know which major food group a food belongs to?
  3. What if all the foods you ate came from only one food group?
  4. What if all foods looked and tasted exactly the same?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The tastes, colors, smells, and textures of foods provide sensory experiences that add or take away from enjoying what we eat.

Nature Of:

  1. To maintain a health body, it is important to eat a variety of healthful foods.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate health enhancing behaviors to prevent unintentional injury or illness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate ways to prevent harmful effects of the sun as well as hearing and vision loss (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain that germs cause disease (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe the symptoms that occur when a person is sick (DOK 1)
  4. Demonstrate ways to prevent the spread of germs that cause common, infectious diseases (DOK 1-2)
  5. Demonstrate proper steps for treating a wound to reduce chances of infection (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes some people more susceptible to Sun damage?
  2. What if we lived in a place that had loud noises all the time?
  3. How does a person get a cold?
  4. Why do surgeons scrub their hands and put on gloves prior to surgery?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Goggles and sun glasses help protects the eyes from injury and damage.
  2. The use of soaps and tissues help prevent the spread of germs.
  3. Scientists have developed products designed to limit sun exposure.
  4. Researchers study how germs spread locally and around the world.

Nature Of:

  1. Strategies exist to prevent damage to the skin from the sun, hearing loss, and vision loss.
  2. A person can make positive decisions to protect themselves from getting sick.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the major food groups and the benefits of eating a variety of foods

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize major food groups (DOK 1)
  2. Identify foods and beverages that are healthy choices for teeth and bones (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain how food is fuel and that different activities need different fuel (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain the health benefits of choosing healthy foods and beverages (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do healthy foods help your body?
  2. How does food fuel our bodies?
  3. What can you do besides brushing and flossing your teeth to help make your teeth and bones strong and healthy?
  4. What would happen to your body if you only ate cookies and candy?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Some automobiles run on gasolines as fuel, humans rely on food as fuel.
  2. Foods like apples, celery, and carrots are known to help keep teeth clean between brushing.
  3. Different people like different foods (culture, geography, family).

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy foods provide nutrients that give energy for daily activities and are necessary for proper growth and good health.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Explain how personal hygiene and cleanliness affect wellness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe what it means to be healthy (DOK 1)
  2. Explain why hygiene is important for good health (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate the steps for proper hand washing (DOK 1)
  4. Explain positive outcomes from brushing and flossing teeth daily (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate steps for proper brushing and flossing of teeth (DOK 1)
  6. Explain why sleep and rest are important for proper growth and good health (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does it mean to be healthy?
  2. How would your teeth look and feel if you did not brush them?
  3. What if nobody ever washed their hands?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Lack of sleep affects concentration and mood.
  2. Effective hand washing can reduce the spread of germs that cause colds and flu.

Nature Of:

  1. Good hygiene promotes good physical health.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 2. Physical and Personal Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Develop self-management skills and personal hygiene skills to promote healthy habits

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop an awareness of healthy habits such as using clean tissues, washing hands, handling food hygienically, brushing teeth, and dressing appropriately for the weather (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to take care of your teeth?
  2. How would you feel if you did not have the right clothes for a very cold or hot day?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The mothers of many baby animals such as cats and rabbits, clean their babies by licking them.
  2. Automatic water faucets, soap dispensers and toilets allow users to be "hands-free" in public place.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal hygiene is an important step in the prevention of disease and illness.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze the interrelationship of physical, mental, emotional, and social health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze the characteristics of a mentally and emotionally healthy person (DOK 1-4)
  2. Describe how mental and emotional health can affect health-related behaviors (DOK 1-3)
  3. Evaluate effective strategies for dealing with stress (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze the causes, symptoms, and effects of depression and anxiety (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you recognize stress in others and respond with kindness and respect, and offer assistance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individual, family, school, peer, and community factors can affect physical, mental, emotional and social health.
  2. Consistent access to real-time technologies can influence a person's stress level.
  3. There are strategies that can relieve stress.

Nature Of:

  1. One's overall well being and learning are affected by physical, mental and emotional health.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Set goals, and monitor progress on attaining goals for future success

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze why setting a personal goal contributes to mental and emotional wellness (DOK 1-4)
  2. Define a clear, attainable personal goal (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe steps needed to reach personal goals (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can planning affect my future?
  2. How does future orientation and goal setting increase one's mental, emotional and social well-being?
  3. Why is achieving a goal gratifying?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Setting goals can influence a person's health.
  2. Individual, family, school, and peer factors influence goal setting.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to plan and set realistic goals can lead to a sense of well being and positive mental health.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Advocate to improve or maintain positive mental and emotional health for self and others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate effective and respectful advocacy strategies in support of the needs and rights of others (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate support and respect for diversity (DOK 1-3)
  3. Advocate for positive and respectful school environment that supports pro-social behavior (DOK 1-4)
  4. Demonstrate how to communicate the importance of seeking help for mental and emotional problems (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are some people embarrassed or afraid to speak up on behalf of others?
  2. Why do we have biases?
  3. What if I found out my best friend was involved in something I had been raised to believe was not right?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The Internet and other digital communications devices allow people from different countries to correspond and learn about each other's lives and culture.
  2. Specialized support groups offer respectful assistance to those experiencing medical, mental, emotional, or addiction-related challenges.

Nature Of:

  1. Mental and emotional health sometimes seems like a personal issue but others can support and advocate for improved mental and emotional health.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Access valid school and community resources to help with mental and emotional health concerns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain that getting help for mental and emotional health problems is appropriate and sometimes necessary (DOK 1-3)
  2. Understand that stereotypes exist about mental and emotional problems, and those stereotypes can influence a person's desire to seek help (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain when it is necessary to seek help for mental and emotional health problems such as depression, mood disorders, and anxiety (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it sometimes hard to talk about emotional concerns?
  2. When you need to talk about problems, how do you know who to trust to tell speak to about problems?
  3. Under what circumstances might you strongly encourage a friend to seek help for his problem? Should you ask a trusted adult for advice if your friend refuses to get help?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Laws have been enacted to protect patient confidentiality.
  2. Stereotypes exist about people with mental disabilities and illness.

Nature Of:

  1. Everyone experiences times of stress and anxiety, it is important to ask for help when needed.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Internal and external factors influence mental and emotional health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze how culture, media, and others influence personal feelings and emotions (DOK 1-4)
  2. Describe how personal and family values and feelings influence choices (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe strategies to minimize negative influences on mental and emotional health (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze internal factors that contribute to mental and emotional health (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can too much time on the internet or watching TV affect mental and emotional health?
  2. How can I avoid negative peer pressure that goes against my personal values?
  3. Does everyone have bias?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Alcohol and other drug use can interfere with a person's ability to effectively deal with emotional and mental health issues.
  2. Heredity plays a major role in the development of certain mental illnesses.

Nature Of:

  1. Overall health is enhanced when one learns how to cope with influences on their mental and emotional health.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate effective communication skills to express feelings appropriately

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to engage in active listening (DOK 1-2)
  2. Practice the use of "I" statements (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate negotiation skills to support the healthy expression of personal needs (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate the ability to state personal needs and articulate limits (DOK 1-3)
  5. Practice verbal and nonverbal ways to ask for help from trusted adults or friends (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will I know who to trust with my personal emotional health issues?
  2. How can I keep my friends if I disagree with them?
  3. How can I express my feelings and concerns if I am shy or feel embarrassed?
  4. How can I be a better listener?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Hostage negotiators rely on using their verbal and non-verbal communications skills to diffuse dangerous situations
  2. Setting boundaries provides a framework for responsible decision-making and can contribute to the development of a positive self-image.

Nature Of:

  1. Effective communication skills affect mental and social health, and are life-long skills.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Develop self-management skills to prevent and manage stress

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Compare and contrast positive and negative ways of dealing with stress (DOK 1-3)
  2. Define stress (DOK 1)
  3. Identify personal stressors (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain the body's physical and psychological responses to stressful situations (DOK 1-2)
  5. Develop personal strategies to deal with stressors (DOK 1-4)
  6. Practice strategies such as physical activity, relaxation techniques, journaling, and talking with someone to reduce stress (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. If you were angry all the time, how would your body respond?
  2. If you were happy all the time, how would your body respond?
  3. Why would it be important to know different ways to manage stress effectively?
  4. Under what circumstances is stress a good thing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Attitude plays an important role in managing stress.
  2. Laughter is the best medicine.
  3. Personal stressors at home, with friends, in school and the community, and in the environment can effect one's feelings and emotions

Nature Of:

  1. Healthy coping strategies exist to help people deal with stress in order to maintain emotional and physical health.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Understand how to be mentally and emotionally healthy

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the interrelationship of physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze the relationship between feelings and behavior (DOK 1-4)
  3. Explain appropriate ways to express needs, wants, and feelings (DOK 1-4)
  4. Explain the causes, symptoms, and effects of anxiety and depression (DOK 1-2)
  5. Identify feelings of depression, sadness, and hopelessness for which someone should seek help (DOK 1-2)
  6. Identify feelings and emotions associated with loss and grief (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do feelings affect behavior?
  2. How can a person control their feelings?
  3. How can the expression of feelings or emotions help or hurt you and others?
  4. Are mental health problems as real/valid as other health problems?
  5. When is it normal to experience anxiety? Depression?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Role-playing activities allow individuals to explore how they might react to unfamiliar situations.
  2. Being aware of one's own feelings and of being sensitive to the feelings of others is important.

Nature Of:

  1. Physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual health are interrelated.
  2. Mental and emotional problems are often regarded as less important than physical problems but can be just as debilitating.
  3. Feelings of sadness and grief are normal.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze internal and external factors that influence mental and emotional health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe how feelings and emotions are portrayed in the media (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify how media and society can influence mental and emotional health (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain how families and peers can influence mental and emotional health (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can you control what you are feeling?
  2. In what ways can others affect how you feel?
  3. How does the media show us both appropriate and inappropriate models for feelings and emotions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Family, peers, and the media can influence a person's mental and emotional health..
  2. Through creating art and reflecting on the art products and processes, people can increase awareness of self and others and better cope with stress and traumatic experiences.

Nature Of:

  1. Mental and emotional health can be affected by many influences so it is important to be able to recognize both positive and negative influences on our feelings and behavior.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify positive behaviors that support healthy relationships

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Discuss factors that support healthy relationships with friends and family (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe the characteristics of a friend (DOK 1-4)
  3. Discuss how culture and tradition influence personal and family development (DOK 1-4)
  4. Describe different kinds of families, and discuss how families can share love, values, and traditions as well as provide emotional support, and set boundaries and limits (DOK 1-3)
  5. Identify the positive ways that peers and family members show support, care, and appreciation for one another (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are relationships with family and friends so important?
  2. What is friendship?
  3. How do your family's customs differ from those of your neighbor? Why is it important to learn about other traditions and values?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Families interact differently in various parts of the world.
  2. Family members, peers, school personnel, and community members can support school success and responsible behavior.

Nature Of:

  1. Sensitivity to differences and appreciation for diversity are characteristics of good mental and emotional health.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehend concepts related to stress and stress management

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify personal stressors at home, with friends, in school and the community, and in the environment (DOK 1-3)
  2. List physical and emotional reactions to stressful situations (DOK 1)
  3. Identify positive and negative ways of dealing with stress (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would school be like if there was no stress?
  2. Can stress be positive?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Stress management techniques relieve and re-direct stress.

Nature Of:

  1. Stress management is key for positive mental health.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Utilize knowledge and skills to treat self and others with care and respect

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the characteristics of someone who has self-respect and positive self-esteem (DOK 1-4)
  2. Acknowledge the value of personal and others' talents and strengths (DOK 1-3)
  3. Summarize the importance of respecting the personal space and boundaries of others (DOK 1-3)
  4. Discuss the importance of thinking about the effects of one's actions on other people (DOK 1-3)
  5. Give examples of pro-social behaviors such as helping others, being respectful of others, cooperation, consideration, and self-control (DOK 1)
  6. Describe the importance of being aware of one's own feelings and of being sensitive to the feelings of others (DOK 1-3)
  7. Express intentions to treat self and others with care and respect (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does self respect and self esteem look like?
  2. What if no one respected other peoples' space, property or feelings?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Being a contributor to the neighborhood is an actionable way to show care
  2. Individual actions can impact a school and community

Nature Of:

  1. Care and respect has benefits for both the person giving it and the ones receiving it.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills to support positive interactions with families, peers, and others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate effective interpersonal communication skills necessary to express emotions, personal needs, and wants in a healthy way (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe positive ways to show care, consideration, and concern for others (DOK 1)
  3. Identify how to show respect for individual differences (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate how to communicate about personal boundaries directly, respectfully, and assertively (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can a shy person show how they are feeling?
  2. What if I am embarrassed to show how I am feeling?
  3. What do I say if someone makes me feel bad?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Feelings can be expressed in verbal and non verbal ways
  2. Online groups can provide support and care for others.

Nature Of:

  1. Positive communication that enhances mental and emotional well being is a lifelong skill

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate how to express emotions in healthy ways

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify a variety of emotions (DOK 1)
  2. Identify appropriate ways to express and deal with emotions and feelings (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate effective listening skills (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe and practice situations that require polite and empathetic responses such as please, thank you, and I'm sorry (DOK 1-3)
  5. Cooperate and share with others (DOK 1-2)
  6. Identify problem-solving strategies, and demonstrate the ability to make choices using those strategies (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a person control their feelings?
  2. Why is it important to be a good listener?
  3. How can I show someone I am listening to them?

Relevance & Application:

  1. People express their emotions in a variety of ways.
  2. Playing games are one way to learn how to express emotions.

Nature Of:

  1. Expressing emotions in appropriate ways is a lifelong skill for school, work and family.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify parents, guardians, and other trusted adults as resources for information about health

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify trusted adults at home and at school (DOK 1)
  2. Identify trusted adults who promote health such as health care providers (DOK 1)
  3. Identify the importance of talking about feelings with parents and other trusted adults (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate the ability to ask for help from trusted adults (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Who are your trusted adults?
  2. Why should you ask an adult for help understanding health information?

Relevance & Application:

  1. School, health care sites, and community and belief centers are places where help might be found.

Nature Of:

  1. Asking for help and health information is a lifelong skill

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 3. Emotional and Social Wellness in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Exhibit understanding that one's actions impact others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate ways to show respect, consideration, and care for others (DOK 1-3)
  2. Explain the importance of respecting the personal space and boundaries of others (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain that feelings influence behavior (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does the way I feel change how I act?
  2. How do my actions affect others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Families are places where personal space is practiced.
  2. Feelings affect behavior at home and at school.

Nature Of:

  1. The understanding of how emotions influence behavior and physical feelings is important to emotional and mental health.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehend concepts that impact of individuals’ use or nonuse of alcohol or other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze healthy alternatives to substance use (DOK 1-4)
  2. Predict the potential effects of an individual's substance abuse on others (DOK 1-4)
  3. Analyze the consequences of using weight-loss pills and products as well as and performance-enhancing drugs (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze the relationship between using alcohol and other drugs as well as other health risks such as unintentional injuries, violence, suicide, sexual activity, and tobacco use (DOK 1-3)
  5. Describe the harmful effects of binge drinking (DOK 1-2)
  6. Summarize the relationship between intravenous drug use and the transmission of blood-borne diseases such as HIV and hepatitis (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does it matter whether or not I understand there are relationships between risky behaviors?
  2. What could happen if I relied on substances to solve situational needs that confronted me (weight, trying to improve athletic performance, adrenalin rush...)
  3. Why is a person more likely to engage in risky behaviors when under the influence of alcohol or drugs than when sober?
  4. What kinds of risks do people sometimes take when under the influence of alcohol or drugs?
  5. How can a person's decision to use/abuse tobacco, alcohol, or drugs affect other people (e.g., friends, families, strangers)?

Relevance & Application:

  1. There are physical, financial, social, and psychological cost of addiction.
  2. Rules and community laws related to the sale and use of tobacco, alcohol, and other drug products are based on the potential risks of drug and alcohol use.
  3. Alcohol, tobacco and other drug use is related to the major causes of death, including driving a motor vehicle, and disease in the United States.

Nature Of:

  1. There are common indicators, stages, and influencing factors of chemical dependency.
  2. Knowledge about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs inform decision making related to personal wellness and the wellness of others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Analyze the factors that influence a person's decision to use or not to use alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Evaluate strategies for managing the impact of internal and external influences on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze the role of individual, family, community, and cultural norms on the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-4)
  3. Describe the financial, political, social, and legal influences on the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why would I choose not to use alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs when it sometimes feels like "everyone is doing it"?
  2. How do I make the "right" decisions?
  3. Is the teen brain the same as an adult brain?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Financial interests based in agriculture, lobbying, manufacturing and distribution support targeted marketing to maintain or increase sales of alcohol and tobacco.
  2. Normal and daily socializing may present access to alcohol, tobacco and drugs.
  3. As society changes and new drugs are developed, knowledge and skills about drugs will need to be learned.

Nature Of:

  1. Culture, media and social pressures influence health decision-making related to alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.
  2. Effective decision-making and communication skills and accurate information about tobacco, alcohol, and drugs can help people make healthy choices that benefit themselves and others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Develop interpersonal communication skills to refuse or avoid alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to refuse alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate effective negotiating skills to avoid riding in a car with someone who has been using alcohol or other drugs (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate effective persuasion skills that encourage friends and family not to use alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would I say if my best friend wanted to drive home after drinking alcohol at a party?
  2. Are some strategies more effective than others in getting people to stop pressuring you to use tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs?
  3. What could you say or do to convince a friend not to try or use tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Communication skills will need to change as communication technology changes.
  2. Automobile technologies exist to prevent the starting of an ignition if alcohol is present in the driver.

Nature Of:

  1. Knowledge and skills about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are needed to inform decision making related to personal wellness and the wellness of others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Develop self-management skills to improving health by staying tobacco, alcohol, and drug-free

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop a personal plan to improve health by staying free of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-4)
  2. Demonstrate the ability to monitor personal behavior related to alcohol or other drug use, including sexual activity and other risky behaviors (DOK 1-4)
  3. Make a personal commitment to avoid situations that put a person at risk due to the presence of alcohol and other drugs (DOK 1-4)
  4. Predict how a drug-free lifestyle supports the achievement of short- and long-term goals (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Under what circumstances, if any, is it "ok" to use alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs?
  2. If you make a commitment to remain or become tobacco, alcohol, and drug free, what support will you need to be successful?
  3. How can remaining alcohol and drug free help you achieve your goals for the future?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Groups in neighborhoods and around the world exist to support alcohol and drug-free living.
  2. Many athletes promote and demonstrate examples of how clean lifestyles bring success.
  3. The use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs has short- and long-term psychological and social effects on self and others.

Nature Of:

  1. Effective strategies can be learned to develop and promote healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.
  2. Choosing a drug-free lifestyle can lead to a variety of health benefits, and can help a person set and achieve important personal goals and lead a fulfilling life.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Analyze the factors that influence community and societal beliefs that underlie violence, and describe relationships, attitudes, behavior, and vulnerability to violence

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate tolerance for individual differences (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze the consequences of prejudice, discrimination, bias, racism, sexism, and hate crimes (DOK 1-4)
  3. Analyze situations that could lead to different types of violence such as bullying, verbal abuse, hazing, physical assault and fighting, dating violence, acquaintance rape, sexual assault, and family violence (DOK 1-4)
  4. Demonstrate the ability to take the perspectives of others in a conflict situation (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Under what circumstances is conflict necessary?
  2. What are strategies for preventing a conflict from escalating?
  3. Is society desensitized to violence?
  4. Are all prejudices wrong?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Police responsible for stopping and reducing crime often measure related symptoms and contributing behaviors which lead to fights, bullying, and assaults.
  2. Blogs, websites and social networks provide vast opportunities to see the perspectives of others in a conflict situation.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal responsibility is the first line of violence-freebehavior.
  2. Individual differences are linked to personal perspectives.
  3. Federal, state, and local laws are often written to prevent violence.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

6. Analyze the underlying causes of self-harming behavior and harming others, and identify steps involved in seeking help

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze the signs and symptoms of people who are in danger of harming themselves or others (DOK 1-4)
  2. Explain how self-directed violence is the result of the accumulation of multiple problems rather than just one problem (DOK 1-4)
  3. Summarize why it is important to tell an adult if there are people who are in danger of harming themselves or others (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why might someone think it is necessary to feel pain to feel alive?
  2. Under what circumstances should you maintain a confidence with someone who may be at risk of hurting himself or others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. School and community resources for adolescent mental and emotional health services provide support for those in need.

Nature Of:

  1. Knowledge about self harming behaviors informs decision making related to personal wellness and the wellness of others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

7. Identify the emotional and physical consequences of violence, and find strategies to deal with, prevent, and report them

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze how power and control differences in relationships such as peer, dating, or family relationships can contribute to aggression and violence (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze situations that could lead to pressure to have sex (DOK 1-4)
  3. Summarize why individuals have the right to refuse sexual contact (DOK 1-4)
  4. Analyze the effects of emotional abuse (DOK 1-4)
  5. Analyze how media messages normalize violence (DOK 1-4)
  6. Explain the risks associated with choosing friends who use substances and violence to solve problems (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is emotional abuse as harmful as physical abuse?
  2. What are the short- and long-term effects of emotional abuse and physical abuse?
  3. Are the friends and relationships you keep a reflection of yourself or just a collection of people to keep you company?
  4. How do I know what personal boundaries to set in relationships?

Relevance & Application:

  1. School and community resources for domestic violence, abuse and rape are available to those in need.
  2. Power and control differences affect personal relationships.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid unsafe situations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

8. Access valid information and resources that provide information about sexual assault and violence

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to access resources such as rape crisis centers that provide accurate information about sexual assault and sexual violence (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate the ability to locate reliable school and community resources to assist with problems related to violence (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Who can I trust to talk to about sexual assault and personal violence?
  2. Under what circumstances should you maintain confidentiality with someone who has been sexually assaulted?
  3. When is it most important to turn to adult resources and/or school or community authorities for help?

Relevance & Application:

  1. School and community resources are available to assist individuals with problems related to violence.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.
  2. The school and community provide valuable resources to support adolescent mental and emotional health, including providing immediate aid, protection, or shelter following an act of violence.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

9. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal communication skills and strategies to prevent violence

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to ask for help from a parent, other trusted adult, or friend when pressured to engage in violence (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to refuse pressure to engage in violence (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate strategies that could be used to prevent a conflict from starting or escalating (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate effective strategies for resolving conflicts with another person in nonviolent ways (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to stop or prevent hazing (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can I stop violence and still keep my friends?
  2. How can I tell if someone needs help?
  3. What are different strategies for helping someone who may be at risk of being a victim of violence?
  4. When does good-natured teasing become hazing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Effective conflict resolution strategies?both verbal and non-verbal are learned over time when the temptation to accept pressure is resisted.
  2. Hostage negotiators utilize conflict resolution strategies to avoid violence and the escalation of conflict.
  3. Effective refusal skills can be used to resist pressures to engage in unhealthy behaviors and situations.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

10. Advocate for changes in the home, school, or community that would increase safety

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Determine situations and environments that could lead to unsafe risks that cause injuries (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain ways to reduce the risk of injuries while biking or driving motor vehicles such as automobiles, snowmobiles, and jet skis, including cell phone use and texting (DOK 1-2)
  3. Advocate for others to not use alcohol or other drugs when biking, driving, or riding in a car (DOK 1-4)
  4. Advocate for changes at home, in school, or in the community that would increase safety - such as testing smoke detectors, implementing a fire escape plan, and erecting fencing around swimming pools (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What can you do to increase the chances of being safe?
  2. What conditions are most likely to increase the risk of injury? Which are under your control?
  3. Why does risky behavior sometimes seem fun?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Insurance companies advocate for safe practices.
  2. Employers reward employees at work for reduced injuries and constantly remind workers to be safe.
  3. Underwriters Laboratory is the nation's authority on product safety and preventable injury concerns.

Nature Of:

  1. Advocating for better results is a trait which serves others.
  2. Effective strategies can be learned for avoiding and reducing the risk of harm in unhealthy or potentially unsafe situations.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze influences that impact individuals' use or nonuse of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Summarize the harmful short- and long-term psychological and social effects of using alcohol and other drugs (DOK 1-3)
  2. List the potential outcomes of typical risk behaviors related to tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs, including the general pattern and continuum of risk behaviors involving substances that young people might follow (DOK 1)
  3. Describe addictions to alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, and point out that addiction is treatable (DOK 1)
  4. Determine situations that could lead to the use of alcohol and other drugs (DOK 1-3)
  5. Describe how mental and emotional health and life circumstances can affect alcohol or other drug use (DOK 1-3)
  6. Discuss the harmful effects of using weight-loss products (DOK 1-2)
  7. Describe the health risks associated with using performance-enhancing drugs (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can depression, anxiety, and other mental problems influence a person's decisions related to tobacco, alcohol, and drug use?
  2. Why are tobacco, alcohol, and some drugs addictive?
  3. What does it take to overcome addiction to these substances?
  4. Is the teen brain more susceptible to addictions than the adult brain?
  5. What is the relationship between using drugs and alchohol and involvement in sexual activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Support groups exist to clarify, inform and support individuals who are influenced by addictive substances.
  2. Substances that promise health benefits (i.e. weight loss or enhanced performance) must be evaluated carefully before use.

Nature Of:

  1. Overcoming addictions to tobacco, alcohol, or drugs requires making a firm commitment to be substance free, taking purposeful action to quit, establishing a network for support, and getting professional help if needed.
  2. Research has established that alcohol, tobacco and other drugs have a variety of harmful effects on the human body.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Access valid sources of information about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze the validity of information, products, and services related to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze the accuracy of images of alcohol and tobacco use conveyed in the media, including advertisements (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can you tell the difference between valid and invalid sources of information about alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs?
  2. Why is it important to understand that media messaging has embedded values and points of view?
  3. Should alcoholic beverage companies be allowed to sponsor athletic events? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Through varied technologies, there exists a proliferation of accurate and inaccurate health information.
  2. Websites post research which is both informative and biased.
  3. Community groups can provide a network of support for individuals trying to abstain from alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use.

Nature Of:

  1. Analyzing the validity of information is a lifelong practice.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate decision-making skills to be alcohol, tobacco and drug-free

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use a decision-making process to avoid using alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in a variety of situations (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze choices about using alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and how these choices can affect friends and family (DOK 1-4)
  3. Express intentions to be alcohol, tobacco, and drug free (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should I care about about being alcohol, tobacco, and drug free?
  2. Do you create situations or are you merely a participant in them?
  3. How do you express your values about other things to others which are firmly held intentions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use affects a person's friends and family to the degree that anonymous and supportive groups meet in order to overcome it.
  2. Decisions about alcohol abuse are a daily challenge for some people and drugs have been created to make nausea occur when alcohol enters the system.

Nature Of:

  1. Decision-making about health is affected by a variety of influences.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Analyze the factors that influence violent and nonviolent behavior

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify media and cultural messages that could lead to different types of violence, including sexual violence (DOK 1-3)
  2. Examine the presence of violence in the media and its possible effects on violent behavior (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe external influences that could lead to violence (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify verbal and nonverbal communication that constitutes sexual harassment (DOK 1-2)
  5. Recognize behaviors that are perceived as sexually coercive (DOK 1-2)
  6. Explain that rape and sexual assault should be reported to a trusted adult (DOK 1-3)
  7. Understand that sexual assault is a crime and must be reported (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is peaceful behavior the same as non-violent? Why or why not?
  2. Would a media-free life diminish assaults?
  3. What would I do if I saw someone being sexually harassed?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Sexual violence and harassment are unacceptable behaviors that result in legal consequences.
  2. Technology has changed the way sexual exploitation and harassment occurs.

Nature Of:

  1. Culture, media and social influences affect violent and non violent behavior.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Demonstrate ways to advocate for a positive, respectful school and community environment that supports pro-social behavior

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate how to prevent or stop bullying as a bystander, perpetrator, or victim (DOK 1-3)
  2. Stand up for those being bullied (DOK 1-4)
  3. Advocate for a positive and respectful school environment that supports pro-social behavior (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do I know if someone is being bullied?
  2. What if my friend is a bully?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Positive behavior support and other school and community programs advocate for pro-social behavior.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze the consequences of using alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Examine the social, economic, health and cosmetic consequences of alcohol, tobacco including chewing tobacco), and other drug use, (DOK 1-3)
  2. Explain how alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are addictive (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain family rules, school policies, and community laws related to the sale and use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain how alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs alter the body and the brain (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe how exercise, nutrition, and positive relationships can mitigate the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze the effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances on a person's ability to make decisions (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Would people still use tobacco if it did not have an addictive quality?
  2. What are the cosmetic effects of using tobacco?
  3. Why does someone become addicted?
  4. Who benefits from the sale of cigarettes?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Researchers have found that drug use in adolescence rewires the brain, making them more susceptible to addiction.
  2. There are social, emotional, and financial consequences to addiction.

Nature Of:

  1. Research has clearly established that use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs have a variety of harmful effects on the human body

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate safety procedures for a variety of situations

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe first-response procedures needed to treat injuries and other emergencies (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify accepted procedures for emergency care and lifesaving care (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify methods of preventing injuries, e.g. transportation, climate (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe actions to take during severe weather or trauma-related emergencies (DOK 1-2)
  5. Analyze the role of peers, family, and media in causing or preventing injuries (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the challenges of creating an emergency plan?
  2. What are the creative ideas that can emerge from building an emergency plan?
  3. Who can I trust to tell me how to be safe?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Every community has emergency plans unique its region.
  2. Every community or region has unique risks associated with living there.
  3. Individual behaviors and the environmentinteract tocause or prevent injuries.

Nature Of:

  1. Basic first aid is a lifelong skill.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze the factors that influence a person's decision to use or not to use alcohol and tobacco

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze internal influences such as genetics, personality, and risk-seeking behaviors on alcohol and tobacco use (DOK 1-4)
  2. Analyze external influences on alcohol and tobacco use (DOK 1-4)
  3. Analyze the influence of exercise, nutrition, and social relationships on alcohol and tobacco (DOK 1-4)
  4. Analyze various strategies the media use, including advertisements and movies, to encourage or discourage tobacco and alcohol (DOK 1-4)
  5. Identify common mixed messages about alcohol in the media such as "drink responsibly" messages (DOK 1-2)
  6. Analyze the perception versus the reality of alcohol use in adolescents (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does alcohol affect the body?
  2. If everyone had the most accurate information available, would they still use alcohol or tobacco?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically, alcohol and tobacco were not considered harmful.
  2. Social networks can support positive decision making.

Nature Of:

  1. Behaviors are affected by heredity, environment and lifestyle.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate the ability to avoid alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate decision-making skills that lead to being substance-free (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate effective, assertive refusal skills in refusing tobacco, alcohol, drugs, and other substances (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain how decisions about substances affect relationships (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify and summarize positive alternatives to substance use (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate planning skills for avoiding alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to be accountable for decisions about substance use?
  2. What would you say to a friend who asked you to try a cigarette when you did not want to?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Learning to respectfully and assertively communicate sets the foundation for healthy choices.

Nature Of:

  1. Good decision making involves personal efficacy, accurate information, and skill development.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate self-management skills to reduce violence and actively participate in violence prevention

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the short- and long-term consequences of violence on perpetrators, victims, and bystanders
  2. Explain the role of bystanders in escalating, preventing, or stopping bullying, fighting, hazing, or violence
  3. Describe strategies to avoid physical fighting and violence
  4. Identify a variety of nonviolent ways to respond when angry or upset
  5. Demonstrate the ability to identify a trusted adult to whom school or community violence should be reported (DOK 1-3)
  6. Describe the dangers of and actions to be taken if weapons are seen or suspected in schools (DOK 1-2)
  7. Demonstrate ways of solving conflicts nonviolently such as conflict resolution and diffusion (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can one person reduce violence?
  2. What are positive and negative effects of weapons on society?
  3. What situations lead to physical fighting and violence?
  4. Why is it my job to stop violence?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The presence of weapons increases the risk of serious injuries.
  2. There are school and community resources to help with violence issues.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Demonstrate ways to advocate for safety, and prevent unintentional injuries

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and correct safety hazards at home, in school, and in the community (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate ways to campaign to help to promote safety, and prevent unintentional injuries (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it possible to create schools and communities that are totally safe?
  2. Would it be desirable to create these totally safe communities?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Advocate for safe efficient transportation for all users surrounding your school.

Nature Of:

  1. Helping my community through advocacy efforts for safety positively affects others and may inspire others to advocate for safety concerns

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Access valid information about the effects of tobacco use and exposure to second-hand smoke, and prescription and over-the-counter drugs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify sources of accurate information about the effects of tobacco use and exposure to second-hand smoke (DOK 1-2)
  2. Analyze the dangers of using tobacco products or being exposed to second-hand smoke (DOK 1-3)
  3. Identify ways to avoid the use of tobacco products as well as exposure to other tobacco smoke (DOK 1)
  4. Describe the proper use of over-the-counter and prescription drugs

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would advertising look like if the media wasn't allowed to omit relevant, but revealing negative information about their product?
  2. Are over the counter drugs safer than prescription drugs?
  3. How would tobacco use or exposure, affect your ability to exercise or play sports?
  4. Why might someone else who uses tobacco want others to do so as well?
  5. If adults can legally drink alcohol, how can it be harmful?
  6. Can your body system continue to operate with a malfunctioning part (i.e. liver)?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology has influenced credibility and availability of information.
  2. Tobacco use is the number one behavior associated with early mortality.
  3. There are varying cultural and religious beliefs surrounding alcohol and tobacco use.

Nature Of:

  1. Making good health decisions requires the ability to evaluate reliable resources.
  2. Research has clearly established that the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs has a variety of harmful effects on the human body.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate pro-social behaviors that reduce the likelihood of physical fighting, violence, and bullying

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify factors that influence both violent and nonviolent behaviors and attitudes (DOK 1-3)
  2. Explain the significance and impact of as well as the short- and long-term consequences of bullying (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate pro-social communication skills and strategies (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify resources, including safe people or adults, regarding violence in the school and community (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do people become violent?
  2. What is the difference between bullying and aggression?
  3. Why is it important to report incidents of bullying?
  4. What types of communication can help you avoid fighting and bullying?
  5. How can we demonstrate appreciation and value for differences?
  6. How do I know who to tell about an unsafe situation?
  7. How do people become prejudiced?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Non-violence is always an option in conflict.
  2. Gangs are examples of bullying groups.
  3. Bullying and violence can have long term emotional and physical consequences.

Nature Of:

  1. Culture, media and social influences affect violent and non violent behavior.
  2. Individuals have a personal responsibility to develop, maintain, and enhance healthy behaviors.
  3. Making good health decisions requires the ability to evaluate reliable resources.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate basic first aid and safety procedures

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify ways to reduce the risk of injuries from animal and insect stings as well as basic first aid procedures (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain what to do such as calling 911 or a poison control center if someone is injured or is poisoned by products such as household cleaners (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe first aid procedures for a variety of situations, including insect stings, bites, poisoning, and choking (DOK 1-2)
  4. Develop and apply a decision-making process for avoiding situations that could lead to injury (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which animals and insects can be dangerous?
  2. What occurs when someone save another from choking?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Community resources are available for basic first aid training.
  2. Basic first aid training facilitates a quick response in emergency situations.
  3. 911 and poison control dispatchers can provide information to help in emergency situations.

Nature Of:

  1. Knowing what to do in an emergency situation?including providing basic first aid and/or seeking help?is a lifelong skill.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify positive and negative uses for medicines

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the purpose of prescribed and over-the-counter medicines and how they can be used or misused in the treatment of common medical problems (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate the ability to read, understand, and follow labels such as those on common household medicines (DOK 1-2)
  3. Summarize the risks associated with the inappropriate use of over-the-counter medicines, prescriptions, and vitamins (DOK 1-3)
  4. Describe the steps to take if over-the-counter or prescription drugs are used incorrectly (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What could happen if I misread a medicine label?
  2. If vitamins are good for me, why would I need to be careful when taking them?
  3. If someone in my family is sick and then I get sick with the exact same thing, can I take the same medication?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Other cultures treat common medical problems in different ways.
  2. Doctors, nurses and pharmacists provide guidance on proper use of medications.

Nature Of:

  1. Medicines must be used correctly to order to be safe and have a maximum benefits.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate the ability to use interpersonal communication skills to avoid using tobacco

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal ways to refuse pressures to use tobacco (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe how to ask for help from a trusted adult in staying away from second-hand smoke (DOK 1-3)
  3. Examine the factors that influence a person's decision to use or not to use tobacco (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know when to say "no," even when it's not popular?
  2. Why do commercials and media sometimes make smoking look glamourous?
  3. Who or what impacts my ability to choose not to use tobacco?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Researchers study tobacco use rates in adolescents.
  2. Researchers have found that exposure to second-hand smoke can have short- and long-term effects on health.

Nature Of:

  1. Successful interpersonal communication is knowing how, when, and why to convey your personal health needs and wants.
  2. Culture, media, and social pressures influence health behaviors.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate skills necessary to prevent a conflict from escalating to violence

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate simple conflict resolution techniques to diffuse a potentially violent situation (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe situations that lead to violence, the consequences of violent behavior, and the importance of resolving conflict through effective communication skills (DOK 1-3)
  3. Discuss methods for making decisions to avoid conflicts or violence (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain the positive alternatives to using violence (DOK 1-2)
  5. Explain the dangers of having weapons at home, in school, and in the community (DOK 1-2)
  6. Explain the importance of respecting the personal space and boundaries of others (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is conflict resolution?
  2. What if there was no violence in the world?
  3. How can you promote peaceful problem solving?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Physical and emotional consequences of violence have a significant impact on society.

Nature Of:

  1. Conflict resolution is a lifelong skill.
  2. Effective communication and personal skills can develop, maintain, and enhance healthy behaviors.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Examine the dangers of using tobacco products or being exposed to second-hand smoke

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Summarize the dangers of experimenting with tobacco (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe how tobacco and prolonged exposure to cigarette smoke affects the body (DOK 1-2)
  3. Understand that tobacco and other drugs can be addicting, but can be treated (DOK 1)
  4. Describe the benefits of abstaining from or discontinuing tobacco use (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does tobacco affect the body?
  2. What are some of the things that could happen if I just "tried" to smoke a cigarette, or chew tobacco?

Relevance & Application:

  1. From a historical perspective tobacco was used for medicinal purposes.
  2. Medical technology has identified the dangers of tobacco use.

Nature Of:

  1. Research has clearly established that tobacco has a variety of harmful effects on the body.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Describe pro-social behaviors that enhance healthy interactions with others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Give examples of pro-social behaviors such as helping others, being respectful of others, cooperation, consideration, and not teasing others (DOK 1)
  2. Describe some of the ways that young children can be helpful intentionally (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe the importance of self-control and ways to manage anger (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How would it feel if you were teased for having a certain eye color?
  2. How do you feel when you are helpful to others?
  3. Why do people get angry?
  4. How can you tell if someone is angry?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Helping others in school and the community is a pro-social behavior.
  2. Self-control can be used to manage anger.

Nature Of:

  1. Anger management is a lifelong skill.
  2. Tolerance, appreciation, and understanding of diversity are important to learn and practice.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify ways to prevent injuries at home, in school, and in the community

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Define how injuries can occur at home, in school, and in the community (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify rules and practices for fire safety (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate the ability to understand a safety plan (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate safe pedestrian and bicycle behaviors (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Is it important to pre-plan for safety?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Safety is the responsibility of all members of a community.
  2. Safety plans save lives and prevent injury.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the dangers of using tobacco products and being exposed to second-hand smoke

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the benefits of not using tobacco (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify the short- and long-term physical effects of using tobacco and being exposed to tobacco smoke (DOK 1-2)
  3. State reasons why one should avoid second-hand smoke (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate the ability to assertively refuse an unwanted item or pressure from a peer (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do people choose to smoke when they know it is bad for them?
  2. Why is it important to be able to refuse something that you do not want?
  3. What might happen if I saw a friend pick up a cigarette and I didn't say anything...I just walked away?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Researchers explore the impact of tobacco on the body's ability to function normally.
  2. Second-hand smoke impacts air quality .

Nature Of:

  1. Effective communication skills enhance a person's ability to express wants and defend their beliefs.
  2. Research has clearly established that tobacco has a variety of harmful effects on the human body.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify safe and proper use of household products

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and distinguish between substances that are safe and unsafe to be taken orally (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain that taking medications incorrectly can be harmful, including vitamins (DOK 1-2)
  3. Articulate the proper and safe use of household products (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What could happen if there were not any labels on medicines, foods, vitamins or other household products?
  2. What is safe or unsafe to eat?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Pharmacists work to explain and protect individuals from unsafe substances or mistaken consumption of medication.
  2. New technologies are being developed to prevent unintentional poisoning.

Nature Of:

  1. Medicines must be used correctly in order to be safe and have maximum benefit.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Explain why bullying is harmful and how to respond appropriately

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Understand why it is wrong to tease others (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify why making fun of others is harmful to self and others (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe the difference between bullying and teasing (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain what to do if you or someone else is being bullied (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does the old saying, "walk a mile in the other person's shoes" apply to teasing and bullying?
  2. If it's just "making fun" then how can it be harmful?

Relevance & Application:

  1. A number of professionals can help when someone is being bullied or teased, including but not limited to counselors, psychologists, police, or trusted adults.

Nature Of:

  1. Tolerance, appreciation, and understanding of diversity are important skills to learn and practice.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Demonstrate interpersonal communication skills to prevent injury or to ask for help in an emergency or unsafe situation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate how to make a decision to call 911 or other emergency numbers for help
  2. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to ask an adult for help about an emergency
  3. Demonstrate effective refusal skills to avoid unsafe situations
  4. Describe the use of safety equipment for specific activities and sports such as biking, skateboard, riding a scooter and inline skating (DOK 1-2)
  5. Identify ways to reduce or prevent the risk of injuries around water (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do I know when to call 911?
  2. What do individuals do when they need to communicate and they cannot speak?
  3. What are the decisions made by emergency workers?
  4. What happens if a player does not wear a helmet or kneepads?
  5. Why is it important to be careful around water?
  6. Why do lifeguards say "walk don't run" at swimming pools?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Ambulance personnel are skilled at considering situations from a variety of aspects.
  2. Young people often get trained to perform CPR or other forms of resuscitation.
  3. Injury prevention requires preparation and communication.
  4. Coast Guard and lifeguards are equipped to prevent and provide help in a water safety situation.
  5. A 911 operator is trained to send help in an emergency and provide help over the phone.
  6. Safety equipment, such as helmets, knee pads, and life jackets, exist to help prevent unintentional injuries.

Nature Of:

  1. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and enhance healthy behaviors and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate strategies to avoid hazards in the home and community

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify safety hazards such as poison, fire, guns, water, playground equipment, and household products in the home and community (DOK 1)
  2. Explain why household products are harmful if ingested or inhaled (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe how to safely ride a bike, skateboard, and scooter as well as use inline skates (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify safety rules for being around fire (DOK 1)
  5. Demonstrate strategies to avoid fires and burns (Stop, drop, and roll) (DOK 1)
  6. Demonstrate how to call 911 or other emergency numbers for help in a situation involving fires (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know the difference between what we can and cannot eat?
  2. Why is it important to know that certain items in the refrigerator and pantry cannot be eaten?
  3. What could happen if you were camping, there was a campfire, and everyone decided to leave and go for a hike without putting the fire out first?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Firefighters practice strategies to prevent fires from starting and to prevent fire from spreading.
  2. Emergency responders practice how to quickly help anyone who ingests and or inhales something not safe.
  3. Children in other countries or communities might need to be aware of different types of hazards.

Nature Of:

  1. Use concepts and skills to identify potential hazards and respond appropriately. (DOK 1)

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify the importance of respecting the personal space and boundaries of self and others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify "appropriate" and "inappropriate" touches (DOK 1-4)
  2. Identify characteristic of a trusted adult (DOK 1-4)
  3. Demonstrate how to tell a trusted adult if inappropriate touching occurs to self or others (DOK 1-4)
  4. Explain that each person has the right to tell others not to touch his or her body (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is respect?
  2. Why is it important to respect myself?
  3. What would it be like if nobody respected anybody else?
  4. What is privacy?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Different situations and settings have varied rules about personal space.
  2. Boundaries are applied to nations, cities and people

Nature Of:

  1. Every individual has the right to personal space and boundaries.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Explain safe behavior as a pedestrian and with motor vehicles

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain safe behavior when getting on and off and while riding on school buses (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain the importance of riding in the back seat and using safety belts and motor vehicle booster seats when one is a passenger in a motor vehicle (DOK 1-2)
  3. Recognize and describe the meaning of traffic signs (DOK 1)
  4. Describe how rules at school can help to prevent injuries (DOK 1-3)
  5. Demonstrate safe pedestrian behaviors (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some things that can happen if everyone runs around and pushes each other?
  2. What would it be like if there weren't any rules for cars or pedestrians?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Crosswalk and traffic signs change based on new research about how children see and react to symbols.

Nature Of:

  1. Vehicles and streets are places with hazards and require careful attention.
  2. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate effective communication skills in unsafe situations

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate verbal and nonverbal ways to ask an adult for help about an unsafe situation (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate the ability to call 911 or other emergency numbers for help (DOK 1)
  3. Define and explain the dangers of weapons and how to tell a trusted adult if you see or hear about someone having a weapon (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would happen if you were lost and you didn't know how to ask for help?
  2. What would you do if you found a gun?
  3. In addition to a phone, how else could you get help when you are at home? In a car?
  4. Without using words, what are ways you could let someone know you need help?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Effective communication is crucial in an emergency situation.
  2. Other forms if technology can be used to communicate in an emergency situation.

Nature Of:

  1. Verbal and non-verbal communication is a creative task in an emergency situation.
  2. Personal strategies can be learned to develop and to avoid, reduce, and cope with unhealthy, risky, or potentially unsafe situations.

Content Area: Comprehensive Health
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 4. Prevention and Risk Management in Health

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify ways to be safe while at play

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. State how to be a safe pedestrian (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify ways to reduce injuries on the playground (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why walk on a sidewalk and not in the middle of the road?
  2. Why should I listen to my teacher when I am on the playground?
  3. How can the playground be a place where I could get hurt when it is so much fun to be there?

Relevance & Application:

  1. It is important to identify situations that are unsafe to prevent injuries.
  2. Many playgrounds are built in special ways to prevent injury.
  3. Some roads and playgrounds are built to accommodate individuals with disabilities.

Nature Of:

  1. All fun settings have material and objects which can inadvertently be the source of injury.