New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Music - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Performance Pathway
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Classification by genre, style, historical period, or culture

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical genre and explain the reasoning for the classification (such as rock, jazz, classical) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical style and explain the reasoning for the classification (classical or baroque, bebop or swing) (DOK 1-2)
  3. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical/historical period and explain the reasoning for the classification (renaissance or baroque, ?80s pop or ?50s rock) (DOK 1-2)
  4. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given culture and explain the reasoning for the classification (Indonesian Gamelan or Japanese Koto) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should people examine music from cultures other than their own?
  2. Why do some cultures not have a word in their native language for music?
  3. How can we come to understand the connections of music and society?
  4. How does music impact the video and film world?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically significant events have an impact on current and future music.
  2. An understanding of distinguishing characteristics of musical genre allows people to articulate why diversity in music is important.
  3. The Internet provides access to various genres and styles of music as well as music from different historical periods and cultures.

Nature Of:

  1. The unique uses of musical elements are the determining factors for the cultural and historical origins of a given musical work.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Evaluation of music using critical, informed analysis

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify basic elements of written examples of music using appropriate musical vocabulary (DOK 1)
  2. Apply specific criteria from similar or exemplary models in evaluating music of compositions, arrangements, and improvisations (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one develop the skills to analyze, assess, and evaluate music?
  2. What determines someone's criteria when evaluating music?
  3. How is personal preference for music developed?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Being able to describe and analyze music gives one a more in-depth understanding of music as a whole.
  2. Evaluating compositions enables one to become a better performer.
  3. Using appropriate vocabulary helps one successfully participate in various performance activities.
  4. Comparing an original work of music with an arrangement of the same piece identifies ways to critique music just as comparisons of adapted works of art, political speeches, or athletic performances are used to critique in society.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical knowledge is broadened through an informed viewpoint. Music evaluation requires a developed understanding of music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Generalist Pathway
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Classification by genre, style, historical period or culture

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical genre and explain the reasoning for the classification (rock, jazz, classical) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical style and explain the reasoning for the classification (classical or baroque, bebop or swing) (DOK 1-2)
  3. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical or historical period and explain the reasoning for the classification (renaissance or baroque, ?80s pop or ?50s rock) (DOK 1-2)
  4. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given culture and explain the reasoning for the classification (Indonesian Gamelan or Japanese Koto) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should people examine music from cultures other than their own?
  2. What is the importance of examining music from different historical periods, cultures and traditions?
  3. How, when, and why is music used in the community?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically significant events have an impact on current and future music.
  2. Understanding distinguishing characteristics of musical genre allows one to articulate why diversity in music is important.
  3. The Internet provides access to various genres and styles of music as well as music from different historical periods and cultures and situates music in a cultural context.
  4. Identifying the cultural characteristics of music aids in identifying and understanding different cultures.

Nature Of:

  1. Music is unique to function, nationality, culture, time, and other factors, but use the same elements.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Transcription, and rhythmic demonstration of multiple, changing meter signatures

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Transcribe or demonstrate rhythms within musical examples that incorporate combinations of dotted notes and corresponding rests in various meters (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate written rhythms using various tempo and dynamic markings (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do meter changes affect the personality of a song?
  2. When are multiple meters used most often in the history of music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various genres reflect varied meter signatures.
  2. Melody reflects a specific style by the way it is written or presented.
  3. Meter signature changes vary in historical, American, and other cultural music.
  4. Digital sequencing software can assist one to hear the effects of using different rhythms.

Nature Of:

  1. Rhythm communicates an idea, emotion, or mood.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identification of musical elements in a level 2 (difficulty rating scale)composition or performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, using a minimum of four markings (articulation, dynamic and tempo), when analyzing a musical example (DOK 1-2)
  2. Given prescribed criteria, identify the form of a composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do musical elements form the structure of a music composition?
  2. Why is it important to analyze compositions based on the use of musical elements?
  3. Why is it important to have leveled compositions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to read various articulation symbols allows one to understand a musical idea.
  2. Musical elements can be compared with other disciplines in written, oral presentations, and multimedia projects.
  3. Different musical elements can be easily experimented with when using notation and sequencing software.
  4. An understanding of differences in criteria in composition levels provides guidance in choosing appropriate literature.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique combinations of musical elements create form, complexity, effect, etc.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notatation of level 1 compositions using the appropriate clef for instrument and/or voice

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify notes in the alto, bass, or treble clef two to three ledger lines above or below the staff (DOK 1)
  2. Notate and transfer chord progression of I, IV, V in a given key signature (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why might it be important to know and understand different clefs?
  2. How can knowing the notes above and below the staff increase musicianship skills?
  3. How can the use of musical elements affect formal structure?
  4. What determines the levels of difficulty in a composition?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the use of notes and clefs allows one to read increasingly difficult levels of music.
  2. Notation software assists in isolating segments of music that highlight components of more advanced compositions.
  3. Form in music has a correlation to form in other disciplines (visual art, mathematics, and dance).
  4. Understanding of the relevance of music notation in historical contexts provides background and appreciation for current notation practices.

Nature Of:

  1. Notation is the language of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analysis of musical elements of a simple level 1 composition or performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, using a minimum of three markings (articulation, dynamic and tempo), when analyzing a musical example (DOK 1-2)
  2. Given prescribed criteria, identify the form of a composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do musical elements form the structure of a music composition?
  2. Why is it important to analyze compositions based on the use of musical elements?
  3. How does the scientific principles of acoustics relate to music

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to read various articulation symbols allows students to understand a musical idea.
  2. Music elements are found in other arts and disciplines (such as dynamics and tempo in dance; dynamics and tempo in debate, speech, or a theatrical performance).
  3. Digital software can be used to understand how music elements affect wave forms.

Nature Of:

  1. Combinations of musical elements create unique forms.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identification of rhythmic and melodic patterns in musical examples

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and demonstrate rhythms within musical examples that incorporate eighth notes and corresponding rests in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter signatures (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate alteration of written rhythms within musical examples, using pp/ff, largo/allegro, legato/staccato and application of accents as found in a beginning level composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to sing/play correct rhythms?
  2. How do meter changes shape a song?
  3. Why create a rhythmic listening map?
  4. Why are notation and sequencing software products important to composers?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Rhythmic characteristics are distinguishable when comparing historical, American, and cultural music.
  2. Rhythmic listening maps provide guidance in music as timelines in the study of history.
  3. Mass media video and audio clips demonstrate the use of dynamics to market a product.

Nature Of:

  1. Rhythmic and melodic patterns are distinguishable characteristics of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notation of level .5 compositions using appropriate clef for instrument and/or voice

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and transcribe or demonstrate notes in alto, bass, or treble clefs in appropriate instrumental and vocal settings; can also include guitar tabulature identification (DOK 1-2)
  2. Notate a major scale and its relative minor (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to understand musical notation?
  2. How does understanding musical modality improve your musical skills?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the elements of music will increase a musician's ability to participate in and perform original compositions.
  2. Using available music technology can increase one's musical fluency and understanding.
  3. Knowing how other disciplines use form increases a musician's understanding of how form is used in music.
  4. Identifying the relationship of major scales and their relative minor scales gives insights to the mathematical correlation used in scale construction.

Nature Of:

  1. Major and minor scales serve as building blocks of music and are used in a variety of ways and settings.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analysis of a beginning level composition or performance using musical elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, using a minimum of two markings (dynamic and tempo) when analyzing a musical example (DOK 1-2)
  2. Analyze articulation, dynamics and tempo during performances (DOK 1-3)
  3. Using current classroom repertoire, identify I, IV, V chords (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know musical symbols and terms?
  2. How do musical symbols help one analyze a performance or develop as a musician?
  3. Why is it important to know how musical symbols and terms are used?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Making informed choices in music reflects personal involvement in the process, which strengthens self-direction and personal decision making.
  2. The skills needed in identification of musical symbols parallel the skills used in identification of literary symbols, historical symbols, and symbols/logos used in society.

Nature Of:

  1. Understanding musical elements creates a more informed listener.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze and apply dynamics, tempo, meter, and articulation using appropriate music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply vocabulary for largo, moderato, diminuendo, and slur when describing music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate largo, moderato, diminuendo, and slur using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do tempo and mood have a close connection?
  2. How does mass media rely on tempo or dynamics to send a message?
  3. Should composers give precise expressive elements within their compositions or leave expression decisions up to the performer? Give a rationale.

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identification of similarities and differences in expressive elements of music from various cultures, historical eras, genres, and styles gives insight to discerning the fundamental characteristics of each.
  2. The ability to interpret tempo markings in music can be compared to the use of adverbs in literature.
  3. Ways instruments produce changes in dynamics can be explained through the physics of sound production.
  4. Using music software to isolate and apply largo, moderato, diminuendo, and slur within compositions demonstrates the importance of these elements.

Nature Of:

  1. Expressive elements enhance musical performance.
  2. The flow of music in time relies on meter and tempo.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analyze more complex instrumental and vocal examples

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally and visually identify various world instruments (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify soprano, alto, tenor, and bass voices (DOK 1)
  3. Aurally identify music from various historical periods and cultures (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument have its own timbre?
  2. How have historical events influenced musical styles?
  3. What makes a particular composition more complex than another?
  4. How is music symmetrical?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Describing ways in which music reflects a composer's emotions, ideas, imagination, and cultural context connects how music can be an extension of someone's own emotions, ideas, imagination, and cultural context.
  2. Using technology and mass media clips to identify more complex instrumental and vocal examples allow novice performers or listeners to experience a multitude of musical variations.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Application and demonstration of the use of more advanced dynamics, tempo, meter and articulation using appropriate music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply vocabulary for mezzo-piano/mezzo-forte, andante, presto, and accelerando/ritardando in describing musical examples (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate mezzo-piano/mezzo-forte, andante, presto, and accelerando/ritardando using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the function of the top and bottom numbers of a time signature in duple and triple meter (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When people listen to a piece of music, what are they listening for?
  2. Why are musical opposites important?
  3. Why do composers usually use a combination of dynamics in a piece of music instead of using just one?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identification of similarities and differences in ways mezzo piano/mezzo forte, andante/presto, and accelerando/ritardando are used in various cultures, historical pieces, genres, and styles allows a novice listener to build musical literacy.
  2. Understanding that most musical terms are Italian builds context for the source of contemporary, western music terminology.
  3. Musical vocabulary has a strong correlation to adverbs in literature. The ability to explain how duple and triple meters compare to the base ten mathematics pattern gives insight to the mathematical nature of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music uses specific vocabulary and expressive elements.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analyze vocal and instrumental examples

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally and visually identify specific instruments of the band and orchestra (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify music performed in two or more parts (DOK 1-2)
  3. Aurally identify music from various periods in history (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument have its own timbre?
  2. How have historical events influenced musical styles?
  3. How has the impact of technology and mass media affected band and orchestral music?
  4. How do different styles of music affect audience response?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Choices made in instrumentation reflect the composer's emotions, ideas, imagination, and cultural context.
  2. Video and audio clips assist in isolating instruments in a band or orchestra to identify the instrument's unique sound.
  3. Marketing companies make choices on music to use in marketing campaigns based on instrumentations that would appeal to their target audience. (Orchestral instrumentation sends a message of high quality, jazz instrumentation sends a sultry or moody message, and popular music appeals to a youthful audience.)

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Identify and aurally recognize melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and use do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, high do, low sol, and low la pitches (diatonic scale) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and use dotted quarter-eighth and triplet notes (DOK 1-2)
  3. Notate four-beat rhythmic patterns and four-beat melodic patterns dictated by the teacher (DOK 1-3)
  4. Aurally recognize IV chord in a I-IV-V pattern (DOK 1-3)
  5. Aurally distinguish between major and minor tonalities (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will identifying melodic and rhythmic patterns improve individual and ensemble performance?
  2. What does harmony add to music?
  3. How does tonality affect the feeling of a piece of music?
  4. Why would a composer use both major and minor tonalities in a composition?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Four-beat musical patterns gives insight to poetry patterns in literature, simple contemporary songs, and nursery rhymes.
  2. Music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles can be compared based on the use of diatonic scale and four-beat rhythmic patterns.
  3. Mass media predominantly employs diatonic scales and four-beat rhythmic and melodic components because they are easily recognizable.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence occurring in discernable patterns.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Apply and demonstrate use of basic dynamics, tempo, meter, and articulation using appropriate music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply vocabulary for pianissimo/fortissimo, largo/allegro, and legato/staccato when describing musical examples (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate pianissimo/fortissimo, largo/allegro, and legato/staccato using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the function of the top number of a time signature involving two, three, and four beats. (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do changes in tempo, dynamics, and articulation affect the mood of music?
  2. When people listen to a piece of music, what are they listening for?
  3. How much freedom should conductors have when presenting a musical work?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Mass media employs varying uses of dynamics, tempo, meter, and articulation when the goal is to draw attention to something.
  2. Electronic keyboards are tools to demonstrate dynamics and articulation and provide rhythm styles that are in duple or triple meter.
  3. Articulation in music mirrors the skill for articulation in speech and theatre productions and requires precise diction and clarity.

Nature Of:

  1. Expressive elements enhance musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Analyze simple notational elements and form in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Visually identify line and space notes and notate pitches on the treble clef staff (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify question-and-answer phrases (DOK 1)
  3. Aurally identify rondo form (DOK 1-2)
  4. Accurately interpret first and second endings (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes a composition interesting?
  2. How will being able to identify notational elements help in music-making?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various musical styles easily recognizable in society (such as marches, lullabies, holiday music) use simple notational elements and form.
  2. American folk music and music of other cultures employ simple notational elements and form because they were shared in the aural tradition and needed to be easily remembered.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical compositions have a specific structure that is defined by the use of elements.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify families of instruments visually and aurally (DOK 1)
  2. Differentiate male and female voices in choral settings (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument sound different?
  2. Why do others have different music preferences?
  3. How is music used in community events and celebrations?
  4. How do different styles of music affect audience response?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology and mass media provide global examples of families of instruments and varying vocal and instrumental tone colors.
  2. Musicians and composers rely on varying tone colors to provide rich, layered effects for the listener.
  3. Similarities and differences can be identified between the use of color in visual arts and music.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension and use of appropriate music vocabulary for dynamics, tempo, meter and articulation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use vocabulary for piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected when describing music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate accent, duple/triple meter, and fermata using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes music interesting to listen to?
  2. Why are there changes in tempo and dynamics in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Music from various cultures use changes in piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected to convey a message.
  2. Music from various historical periods, genres, and styles use examples of piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected.
  3. Music from various mass media use changes in piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected to convey a desired message. (Relaxation is identified with a soft, smooth musical line; excitement is identified with a loud, accented musical line.)

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Comprehension of beginning melodic and rhythmic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and use step/skip/repeat, do, re, mi, sol, la pitches (pentatonic scale) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and notate, using half notes, whole notes, half rests and whole rests (DOK 1-2)
  3. Visually identify a chord (space-space-space or line-line-line) (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will knowing notes and rests help me in performing music?
  2. How will echoing melodic patterns help me understand a song?
  3. How is the step/skip/repeat skill a math problem?
  4. How is a pentatonic scale like counting by 5s?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to recognize the patterns that occur in music relates to the patterns that can be found in many disciplines and vocations (mathematics, history, visual art and design, architecture, science).
  2. Musical themes/patterns/textures can be compared to the use of these elements in stories, songs, and other art forms.
  3. Mathematical counting equivalents can be applied to half notes, half rests, whole notes, and whole rests.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence.
  2. Patterns occur in music and in the world.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension of gradual changes in dynamics and tempo

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use vocabulary for getting louder/softer and getting faster/slower (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate getting louder/softer and getting faster/slower using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes music interesting to listen to?
  2. Why are there changes in tempo and dynamics in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Explaining the difference between making music louder or softer with a volume controller versus how music is performed provides the understanding that dynamics changes involve changes in intensity and character, not just a change in decibels.
  2. Using video and audio clips to identify the louder and softer parts of music illustrates the large variety of ways these elements are used in music.

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Comprehension of basic vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify pitched and non-pitched classroom instruments using sight and sound (DOK 1)
  2. Identify and demonstrate singing, speaking, whispering, and shouting voices (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do instruments sound different?
  2. Why do others have different music preferences?
  3. How is music used in community events and celebrations?
  4. How does music make you feel different?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology and mass media provide global examples of families of instruments and varying vocal and instrumental tone colors.
  2. Musicians and composers rely on varying tone colors to provide rich, layered effects for the listener.
  3. Similarities and differences can be identified between the use of color in visual arts and tone color and texture in music.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Comprehension of basic rhythmic and melodic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate steady beat, strong/weak beat, difference between beat, and rhythm (DOK 1-2)
  2. Aurally recognize and demonstrate going up/going down, and sol-mi-la (or mi-re-do) pitches (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify and notate using quarter notes, eighth notes and quarter rests (DOK 1-2)
  4. Discriminate between same/different rhythmic and melodic patterns (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to keep a steady beat?
  2. How will identifying notes and rests help me in performing music?
  3. How will echoing different pitches help in understanding a song?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to recognize the patterns that occur in music relates to the patterns that can be found in many disciplines and vocations (mathematics, history, visual art and design, architecture, science).
  2. Musical themes, patterns, and textures can be compared to the use of these elements in stories, songs, and other art forms.
  3. Mathematical counting equivalents can be applied to quarter notes, eighth notes, and quarter rests.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence.
  2. Patterns occur in music and in the world.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension of musical opposites

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use their own vocabulary to describe musical opposites (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate loud/soft, fast/slow, high/low, sound/silence, and beat/no beat (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do opposites make music more interesting to listen to?
  2. What other opposites can be found in other disciplines?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identifying musical opposites in various historical periods, cultural styles, and genres of music and mass media strengthens one's ability to comprehend the range of the continuum of musical opposites in specific areas.
  2. Demonstrating musical opposites through movement helps to assess one's understanding of what an opposite is kinesthetically.
  3. Demonstrating opposites aurally and kinesthetically builds long-term memory and connections to literary and societal opposites.

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.
  2. Specific vocabulary is necessary to describe music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehension of basic elements of musical form

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally identify same/different patterns and phrases (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use body movement to interpret musical phrases (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. In what ways will a person's hearing help when listening to a song?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various musical styles (American folk music, marches, lullabies) can be used to provide examples of same and different phrases.
  2. The ability to hear same and different phrases is a foundational skill to developing aural discrimination in musical works.

Nature Of:

  1. Most musical compositions have a specific structure.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify different vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify male/female voices (DOK 1)
  2. Describe vocal and instrumental sounds using personal vocabulary (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do voices and instruments sound different?
  2. What are differences and similarities between two sounds?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles to hear male/female voices and varying vocal and instrumental sound provides a global context for the ways music is used.
  2. Using examples such as cartoons, computer games, community, and home events to identify male/female voices and varying instrumental sounds provides a connection to the real ways music is used in the community.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Describe and respond to musical elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use an individual vocabulary to describe music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use body movement to respond to dynamics and tempo (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does music make you feel?
  2. What elements of a piece of music contribute to changes in mood?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to identify dynamics and tempo changes are the beginning foundational skills to understanding the elements in music.
  2. Describing what one hears when listening to diverse samples of music builds a foundational skill of responding verbally to a musical feeling.

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.
  2. Specific vocabulary is necessary to describe music.