New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

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Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eleventh Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Ideas synthesized from informational texts serve a specific purpose

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. (CCSS: RI.11-12.1)
    • Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. (CCSS: RI.11-12.2)
    • Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. (CCSS: RI.11-12.3)
    • Designate a purpose for reading expository texts and use new learning to complete a specific task (such as convince an audience, shape a personal opinion or decision, or perform an activity)
    • Predict the impact an informational text will have on an audience and justify the prediction
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10). (CCSS: RI.11-12.4)
    • Use text features and graphical representations to complement comprehension and enhance critical analysis of a text
    • Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. (CCSS: RI.11-12.5)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses). (CCSS: RI.11-12.8)
    • Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. (CCSS: RI.11-12.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RI.11-12.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Does a periodical's headline affect an argument differently?
  2. When people's ideas are challenged, does their ego or instinct respond first?
  3. What is the greatest authoritative position from which to write for a specific purpose?
  4. Describe an author's belief that you can cite from the text. Why do you suppose the author holds that belief? Do you share that same belief? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Pharmacists require the ability to compare and synthesize ideas from informational texts to prevent unnecessary deaths.
  2. Mechanics use informational texts when making repairs to assess the sufficiency of a specific "fixing" function.
  3. Air quality commissioners depend and must discern many research texts to make difficult and specific decisions.
  4. Trusted Web sites are used to seek out visual and multimedia representations of printed text to enhance understanding.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers use relevant background knowledge and consistently apply it to what they are reading to better facilitate drawing conclusions and increase comprehensibility of the text.
  2. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: RST.11-12.1-10)
  3. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: RH.11-12.1-10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Ninth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Increasingly complex informational texts require mature interpretation and study

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. (CCSS. RI.9-10.2)
  2. Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). (CCSS: RI.9-10.5)
  3. Evaluate clarity and accuracy of information through close text study and investigation via other sources
  4. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. (CCSS: RI.9-10.3)
  5. Use flexible reading and note-taking strategies (outlining, mapping systems, skimming, scanning, key word search) to organize information and make connections within and across informational texts
  6. Critique author's choice of expository, narrative, persuasive, or descriptive modes to convey a message
  7. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. (CCSS: RI.9-10-8)
  8. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RI.9-10.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does an author work to persuade readers to change their opinions?
  2. How does an author alter readers' thoughts as they read a text?
  3. What visual imagery does the author create to activate one or more of the readers' emotions?
  4. What is the difference between text that is explicitly accurate and text that is explicitly logical?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Companies and organizations like to use influential people in their advertisements to sell their products.
  2. With constant exposure to graphics and multimedia in our world, people need to be conscious of how these images influence thinking.
  3. Reading newspaper (or online blogs) editorials can affect the way in which people perceive information (mob mentality or bandwagon effect).

Nature Of:

  1. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: RST.9-10.1-10)
  2. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: RH. 9-10.1-10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Literary texts are understood and interpreted using a range of strategies

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use pre-reading strategies, such as identifying a purpose for reading, generating questions to answers while reading, previewing sections of texts and activating prior knowledge
  2. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (CCSS: RL.5.1)
    • Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. (CCSS: RL.5.2)
    • Compare and contrast two or more character's points of view, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact). (CCSS: RL.5.3)
  3. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. (CCSS: RL.5.4)
    • Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words. (CCSS: L.5.5c)
    • Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem. (CCSS: RL.5.5)
    • Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described. (CCSS: RL.5.6)
    • Locate information to support opinions, predictions, inferences, and identification of the author's message or theme
    • Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g. dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems. (CCSS: L.5.3b)
  4. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem). (CCSS: RL.5.7)
    • Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics. (CCSS: RL.5.9)
    • Use knowledge of literary devices (such as imagery, rhythm, foreshadowing, simple metaphors) to understand and respond to text.
  5. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (CCSS: RL.5.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When are thinking strategies important?
  2. How do readers adjust reading strategies to better understand different texts? What does it mean to be flexible?
  3. How are literary texts similar? How are they different?
  4. Why does point of view matter? How does it contribute to conflict? How can understanding point of view reduce conflict?
  5. If readers could remove inference skills from a person, what would be the consequences?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Comprehension skills help us question the author's purpose and view the world with a critical eye (using persuasion to influence our decisions and choices).
  2. Acknowledging multiple points of view help people as they meet and work with others.
  3. Foreshadowing is a skill that helps people prepare for future events because it creates a fundamental readiness.
  4. Authors use words to create pictures for the reader. As readers become aware of visual imagery, they increase their comprehension and use of metacognition.
  5. Graphical and multimedia elements of online text provide additional context and structural clues to increase comprehension.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers think about the characters and their traits and how they relate to each other.
  2. Readers recognize big ideas in literary text that reflect the human experience.
  3. Readers are always thinking about the words the author uses to paint pictures.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Ideas found in a variety of informational texts need to be compared and understood

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (CCSS: RI.5.1)
    • Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. (CCSS: RI.5.2)
    • Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. (CCSS: RI.5.3)
    • Distinguish between fact and opinion, providing support for judgments made
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area. (CCSS: RI.5.4)
    • Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts. (CCSS: RI.5.5)
    • Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. (CCSS: RI.5.6)
    • Use informational text features (such as bold type, headings, graphic organizers, numbering schemes, glossary) and text structures to organize or categorize information, to answer questions, or to perform specific tasks
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently. (CCSS: RI.5.7)
    • Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s). (CCSS: RI.5.8)
    • Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. (CCSS: RI.5.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (CCSS: RI.5.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How and when do readers adjust reading strategies to better understand different types of text?
  2. What text features are most helpful and why? How do text features help readers access information quickly?
  3. Why do authors use specific text features to convey a message?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Text features communicate key concepts.
  2. Skimming and scanning are important elements of learning and gathering information.
  3. The information age requires readers to process lots of information quickly and to determine importance.
  4. Online reading makes it challenging for students to learn to focus and follow hyperlinked texts only as appropriate to the information seeking task

Nature Of:

  1. Readers automatically retrieve information while they skim and scan text.
  2. Readers use text features before, during, and after reading to increase connections and comprehension.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension and fluency matter when reading literary texts in a fluent way

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (CCSS: RL.4.1)
    • Identify and draw inferences about setting, characters (such as motivations, personality traits), and plot. (CCSS: RL.4.2)
    • Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. (CCSS: RL.4.3)
    • Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). (CCSS: RL.4.4)
    • Describe the development of plot (such as the origin of the central conflict, the action of the plot, and how the conflict is resolved)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean). (CCSS: RL.4.4)
    • Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text. (CCSS: RL.4.5)
    • Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations. (CCSS: RL.4.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. (CCSS: RL.4.7)
    • Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. (CCSS: RL.4.9)
    • Summarize text by identifying important ideas and sequence and by providing supporting details, while maintaining sequence.
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RL.4.10)
    • Read familiar texts orally with fluency, accuracy, and prosody (expression)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do people use different reading strategies to better understand different genres (poetry, stories, nonfiction)?
  2. What can readers infer about the main character of a text?
  3. How are you similar or different from the characters in the text?
  4. How did the author use events to prepare the reader for the ending?
  5. How would the story be different if the author changed the setting?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The skills used in reading comprehension transfers to readers' ability to understand and interpret events.
  2. Analyzing character traits supports working relationships in the workplace.
  3. It is important to be able to identify conflict and how it occurs and to look for strategies to deal with conflict.
  4. Reading with prosody increases comprehension and fluency. These are skills of proficient readers.
  5. Use of voice recording software to record, listen to and follow along with words and texts can enhance understanding

Nature Of:

  1. Readers think about the tone and message of the text. They use the expression to make reading clear.
  2. Readers continually monitor their thinking as they read.
  3. Readers think about how the setting of a story can completely change how they think about the plot. Readers think about how the story would have been different in a different setting.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Strategies are needed to make meaning of various types of literary genres

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. (CCSS: RL.3.1)
    • Use a variety of comprehension strategies to interpret text (attending, searching, predicting, checking, and self-correcting)
    • Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. (CCSS: RL.3.2)
    • Describe and draw inferences about the elements of plot, character, and setting in literary pieces, poems, and plays
    • Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. (CCSS: RL.3.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language. (CCSS: RL.3.4)
    • Use signal words (such as before, after, next) and text structure (narrative, chronology) to determine the sequence of major events
    • Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. (CCSS: RL.3.5)
    • Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. (CCSS: RL.3.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting). (CCSS: RL.3.7)
    • Summarize central ideas and important details from literary text
    • Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series). (CCSS: RL.3.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (CCSS: RL.3.10)
  5. Read grade level text accurately and fluently, attending to phrasing, intonation, and punctuation

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do readers use different reading strategies to better understand a variety of texts?
  2. How is accuracy in reading like accuracy in mathematics?
  3. What would reading be like if readers had no signal words to assist them?
  4. What was one prediction that you made that changed after you read the text?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The skills used in reading comprehension transfer to readers' ability to understand and interpret information.
  2. Poets give readers literature with specific structure for styled meaning.
  3. School plays require a plot and settings to be interesting.
  4. Publishing podcasts online provide an authentic audience for students to help them in practicing fluency.

Nature Of:

  1. Using what they know about phrasing and punctuation helps readers read proficiently and get more meaning from a text.
  2. Reading helps people understand themselves and makes connections to the world.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Fluent reading depends on specific skills and approaches to understanding strategies when reading literary text

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Demonstrate use of self-monitoring comprehension strategies: rereading, checking context clues, predicting, questioning, clarifying, activating schema/background knowledge to construct meaning and draw inferences
    • Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. (CCSS: RL.2.1)
    • Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. (CCSS: RL.2.2)
    • Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. (CCSS: RL.2.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. (CCSS: RL.2.4)
    • Read high-frequency words with accuracy and speed
    • Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. (CCSS: RL.2.5)
    • Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. (CCSS: RL.2.6)
    • Identify how word choice (sensory details, figurative language) enhances meaning in poetry
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. (CCSS: RL.2.7)
    • Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. (CCSS: RL.2.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RL.2.10)
  5. Compare formal and informal uses of English. (CCSS: L.2.3a)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to read the title before reading the text?
  2. What would happen to comprehension if readers never went back and re-read something they did not understand?
  3. Why is it important to read accurately and fluently?
  4. What would a summary look like if a writer did not stick to the important details?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Read stories and text to others using appropriate phrasing, intonation, rate, and attention to punctuation.
  2. Distinguish different literary forms (i.e., poetry, narrative, fiction).
  3. Interpret the intended message in various genres (such as fables, billboards, web pages, poetry, and posters).
  4. Listening and reading along with the text of digital audio stories of multiple genres aid in comprehension and fluency.

Nature Of:

  1. Reading helps people understand themselves and make connections to the world.
  2. Readers use comprehension strategies automatically without thinking about them.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Fluent reading depends on specific skills and approaches to understanding strategies when reading informational text

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. (CCSS: RI.2.1)
    • Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text. (CCSS: RI.2.2)
    • Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. (CCSS: RI.2.3)
    • Summarize the main idea using relevant and significant detail in a variety of texts read or read aloud
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area. (CCSS: RI.2.)
    • Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently. (CCSS: RI.2.5)
    • Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. (CCSS: RI.2.6)
    • Read text to perform a specific task (such as follow a recipe, play a game)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text. (CCSS: RI.2.7)
    • Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text. (CCSS: RI.2.8)
    • Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic. (CCSS: RI.2.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity to:
    • Adjust reading rate according to type of text and purpose for reading
    • By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RI.2.10)
  5. Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases. (CCSS: L.2.4e)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What text features are most useful when reading informational texts? Why?
  2. How does using the table of contents save a reader time?
  3. What are two or more uses of the bold key words in the text?
  4. How do captions assist a reader in gathering information?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Use background knowledge and connect it to new information to learn many new concepts or ideas.
  2. Identifying features of online websites help one navigate and understand saving time and increasing comprehension.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers gather information from multiple sources. Comparing what they know to what they want to learn helps construct new meaning.
  2. Readers read for enjoyment and information.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehending and fluently reading a variety of literary texts are the beginning traits of readers

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (CCSS: RL.1.1)
    • Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. (CCSS: RL.1.2)
    • Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. (CCSS: RL.1.3)
    • Make predictions about what will happen in the text and explain whether they were confirmed or not and why
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. (CCSS: RL.1.4)
    • Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types. (CCSS: RL.1.5)
    • Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text. (CCSS: RL.1.6)
    • Follow and replicate patterns in predictable poems.
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. (CCSS: RL.1.7)
    • Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories. (CCSS: RL.1.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity to:
    • With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1. (CCSS: RL.1.10)
  5. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension: (CCSS: RF.1.4)
    • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding. (CCSS: RF.1.4a)
    • Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. (CCSS: RF.1.4b)
    • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. (CCSS: RF.1.4c)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a reader picture the character?
  2. How does a reader explain a character's actions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Readers can use a graphic organizer to sequence key events/details in a literary or informational text.
  2. Readers want to pay attention to punctuation marks to help them with the meaning of the story.

Nature Of:

  1. Reading fluently helps people comprehend what they have read.
  2. Identifying the problem in a story also helps readers think about the solution.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehending and fluently reading a variety of informational texts are the beginning traits of readers

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (CCSS: RI.1.1)
    • Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. (CCSS: RI.1.2)
    • Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. (CCSS: RI.1.3)
    • Activate schema and background knowledge to construct meaning
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text. (CCSS: RI.1.4)
    • Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text. (CCSS: RI.1.5)
    • Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text. (CCSS: RI.1.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas. (CCSS: RI.1.7)
    • Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text. (CCSS: RI.1.8)
    • Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures). (CCSS: RI.1.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity to:
    • With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for grade 1. (CCSS: RI.1.10)
  5. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. (CCSS: RF.1.4)
    • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding. (CCSS: RF.1.4a)
    • Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression. (CCSS: RF.1.4b)
    • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. (CCSS: RF.1.4c)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the author saying with different punctuation marks?
  2. How does a reader's voice change when a sentence uses a specific punctuation mark?
  3. In informational text, why is the main idea important? How do the details support the main idea?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Readers can use a graphic organizer to sequence key events/details in a literary or informational text.
  2. Authors help readers make connections to the world.

Nature Of:

  1. Reading fluently helps people comprehend what they have read.
  2. Readers can share facts after reading an informational text.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. A concept of print to read and a solid comprehension of literary texts are the building blocks for reading

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (CCSS: RL.K.1)
    • With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. (CCSS: RL.K.2)
    • With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. (CCSS: RL.K.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. (CCSS: RL.K.4)
    • Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems). (CCSS: RL.K.5)
    • With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story. (CCSS: RL.K.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). (CCSS: RL.K.7)
    • With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories. (CCSS: RL.K.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity to:
    • Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. (CCSS: RL.K.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. During a picture-walk through a book, what do readers predict? Why?
  2. What words can readers use to describe the main character in a story?
  3. Was the title of this story a good title? What could be another title?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Thinking about the characters in a story helps make a connection to them.
  2. Online games and computer software provide a means to practice identifying main characters, setting, key events, arranging events in order.

Nature Of:

  1. Reading helps people understand themselves and make connections to the world.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. A concept of print to read and a solid comprehension of informational text are the building blocks for reading

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (CCSS: RI.K.1)
    • With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. (CCSS: RI.K.2)
    • With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. (CCSS: RI.K.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. (CCSS: RI.K.4)
    • Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book. (CCSS: RI.K.5)
    • Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text. (CCSS: RI.K.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts). (CCSS: RI.K.7)
    • With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text. (CCSS: RI.K.8)
    • With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures). (CCSS: RI.K.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity to:
    • Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. (CCSS: RI.K.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do the illustrations help you figure out the meaning of the text?
  2. Explain why informational text is not read like a literary text.

Relevance & Application:

  1. Environmental print, signs, or symbols help people follow directions (such as walk or wait street crossing signs, routine schedules).
  2. Environmental print, signs, or symbols help to organize daily life (put materials or toys away).
  3. When readers read or hear information, they remember what is learned and share information with others.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers make connections to what they are reading