New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eleventh Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Validity of a message is determined by its accuracy and relevance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (CCSS: SL.11-12.1)
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. (CCSS: SL.11-12.1a)
    • Critique the accuracy, relevance, and organization of evidence of a presentation
    • Evaluate effectiveness of oral delivery techniques
    • Listen critically to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the presentation
    • Analyze the resources cited for validity
    • Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. (CCSS: SL.11-12.1b)
  2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data. (CCSS: SL.11-12.2)
  3. Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. (CCSS: SL.11-12.3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do people benefit from listening to the perspectives of others?
  2. Why is it important to cite valid and reliable sources?
  3. When is something in life perceived as accurate and relevant to experiences, and yet wrong?
  4. Is there any fact that is forever certain?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Informed voters must "do their homework" and verify facts, premises, and claims.
  2. Asking relevant questions is a combination of skepticism and good faith.
  3. Fact-checking engines can be used to determine citations, sources, and the validity of evidence.
  4. Historians must always substantiate and prove their claims.

Nature Of:

  1. Skilled communicators are both critical listeners and effective speakers.
  2. Good communicators evaluate other speakers' points of view, biases, and evidence.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Tenth Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Effectively operating in small and large groups to accomplish a goal requires active listening

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1)
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1a)
    • Support others in discussions, activities, and presentations through active listening
    • Listen actively in groups to accomplish a goal
    • Contribute effectively in both small and large groups to collaboratively accomplish a goal
    • Choose specific words for intended effect on particular audiences
    • Facilitate (or lead) a group by developing an agenda designed to accomplish a specified goal
    • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1b)
    • Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1c)
  2. Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. (CCSS: SL.9-10.3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is being able to effectively function in a collaborative group a necessary skill?
  2. What criteria could be used to measure the effectiveness of a group?
  3. What are effective ways to monitor group skills and individual contributions?
  4. How can individuals monitor their own group's progress and effectiveness?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When working together, each member contributes to the larger outcome. (For example, airline personnel work collaboratively to safely transport thousands of people daily. The hospitality industry demands collaborative skills and active listening to provide an enjoyable experience for its patrons.)
  2. Online shared workspaces host opportunities to operate in an effective group setting.
  3. Professional sports teams demand active listening, shared leadership, instant decision-making, and strategic subordinate roles.

Nature Of:

  1. Skilled communicators are aware of their own actions, which helps them to determine when leadership is needed and when they need to be more of a support person to others.
  2. Skilled communicators study people in their group and listen for warning signs that perhaps people are not being heard. When they recognize the inequity, they ask, "What do you think?"

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Ninth Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Listening critically to comprehend a speaker's message requires mental and physical strategies to direct and maintain attention

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1)
    • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. (CCSS: SL.9-10.1b)
  2. Follow the speaker's arguments as they develop; take notes when appropriate
  3. Give verbal and nonverbal feedback to the speaker
  4. Ask clarifying questions
  5. Evaluate arguments and evidence
  6. Explain how variables such as background knowledge, experiences, values, and beliefs can affect communication
  7. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. (CCSS: SL.9-10.2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a speaker's personal history affect his point of view?
  2. What is appropriate feedback?
  3. What is inappropriate feedback?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Taking notes when listening to a speaker helps audience members remember what was said.
  2. Providing feedback is an important skill that is used in many professional settings (such as a doctor's office or courtroom, or in construction or engineering environments).
  3. Utilize electronic feedback tools for immediate feedback.
  4. Use library databases to evaluate evidence and arguments.

Nature Of:

  1. Skilled listeners understand the context of a presenter's point of view.
  2. Skilled listeners use their own experiences to relate to a speaker's topic.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. A variety of response strategies clarifies meaning or messages

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (CCSS: SL.8.4)
  2. Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. (CCSS: SL.8.5)
  3. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (CCSS: SL.8.6)
  4. Paraphrase speaker's meaning
  5. Ask questions to clarify inferences

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do people develop good listening skills?
  2. How do audience members determine the meaning of nonverbal cues?
  3. Why is it important to understand the speaker's background?
  4. How is asking questions a useful strategy in learning?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Public speakers use appropriate gestures, facial expressions, posture, and body language in a variety of situations (such as resolving conflicts, negotiating, and presenting reports).
  2. Professionals use oral communication skills to foster collaboration. For example, jury members are required to determine if a witness is telling the truth; business executives work in teams to complete a project on time.
  3. Computer animation technologies portray the nonverbal intent of a character.
  4. Use electronic tools, such as word mapping techniques, to analyze a speaker's meaning.

Nature Of:

  1. Skilled listeners recognize the contributions of others.
  2. Skilled listeners listen and ask good questions.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Listening strategies are techniques that contribute to understanding different situations and serving different purposes

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Listen to other's ideas and form their own opinions
  2. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. (CCSS: SL.5.1)
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. (CCSS: SL.5.1a)
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. (CCSS: SL.5.1b)
    • Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. (CCSS: SL.5.1c)
    • Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. (CCSS: SL.5.1d)
  3. Model a variety of active listening strategies (eye contact, note taking, questioning, formulating clarifying questions)
    • Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (CCSS: SL.5.2)
  4. Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence. (CCSS: SL.5.3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is eye contact used to persuade others who are listening?
  2. When is it important to use volume as a tool in communication?
  3. Why is it difficult to accept someone else's point of view?
  4. What can speakers do to make people want to listen to what they have to say?
  5. How does body language tell a speaker that he/she is having the desired effect on the audience?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using precise language increases clarity in communication. (A mediator listens to both sides of an argument and then gives a recommendation to solve the problem.)
  2. Utilizing online presentation tools engages audiences from across the world.
  3. Acknowledging, both verbally and in writing, what has been heard is critical when learning new information.

Nature Of:

  1. Good listeners seek to understand before they respond.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. New information can be learned and better dialogue created by listening actively

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. (CCSS: SL.2.1)
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). (CCSS: SL.2.1a)
    • Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others. (CCSS: SL.2.1b)
    • Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion. (CCSS: SL.2.1c)
  2. Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. (CCSS: SL.2.2)
  3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue. (CCSS: SL.2.3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do people learn more by talking or listening? Why?
  2. How do people respond to ideas that are unfair?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Communicators check their personal thinking to ensure other points of view are considered fairly.
  2. Listeners use background knowledge to answer questions before asking others.
  3. Video game designers create a variety of options to allow the players to have choices.
  4. Doctors listen to their patients and use their own knowledge of medicine to make a diagnosis.
  5. Use electronic tools to provide feedback.

Nature Of:

  1. Good listeners make new discoveries by using their own knowledge along with information they hear from others.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Multiple strategies develop and expand oral vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. (CCSS: SL.1.4)
  2. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. (CCSS: SL.1.)
  3. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (CCSS: SL.1.6)
  4. Give and follow simple two-step directions.

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to learn new words?
  2. How is the meaning of a word demonstrated without speaking?
  3. How do presenters decide which words to use when they speak?
  4. What is the value of using different words in writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Choose specific words to make communication clearer. (Storytellers select their words very carefully to express a thought or feeling clearly to the audience or reader.)
  2. Use words to orally describe actions, people, places, things, and ideas. (Visual artists demonstrate the ability to express many words through a work of art. A picture is worth a thousand words.)
  3. Increase exposure to words for use in speaking and writing.
  4. Library database products can provide exposure to oral and written vocabulary.
  5. Electronic drawing tools can be used to illustrate vocabulary.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators use a variety of words when speaking and writing to demonstrate their understanding of a topic.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Communication relies on effective verbal and nonverbal skills

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. (CCSS: SL.K.1)
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion). (CCSS: SL.K.1a)
    • Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges. (CCSS: SL.K.1b)
  2. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood. (CCSS: SL.K.2)
  3. Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood. (CCSS: SL.K.3)
  4. Listen with comprehension to follow two-step directions.
  5. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts. (CCSS: L.K.6)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are proper ways for people to ask for something they need?
  2. Why is it important for people to wait their turn before speaking?
  3. What does it mean to be a good listener?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When asking for directions it is important to ask clarifying questions to avoid getting lost.
  2. Speaking politely to customers and acknowledging their concerns is important to people who work in stores and restaurants.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators are courteous and speak with respect for others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Vocal sounds produce words and meaning to create early knowledge of phonemic awareness

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and create rhyming words
  2. Identify and create alliterations
  3. Identify words orally according to shared beginning or ending sounds
  4. Blend sounds orally to make one-syllable words
  5. Segment one-syllable words into sounds
  6. Segment spoken words into onset (initial consonant sounds) and rime (vowel to end of syllable)
  7. Identify the initial, medial, and final phoneme (speech sound) of spoken words

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are phonemes (speech sounds) important?
  2. What is the difference between phonemes (speech sounds) and other sounds?
  3. Could people communicate well if they could only use five words?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identifying differences between common sounds in the home is necessary for safety and everyday living (such as the phone and doorbell, smoke alarm and kitchen timer).
  2. Recorded sources of sample sounds are used to help clarify the spoken word.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to segment and blend phonemes facilitates spelling and decoding.
  2. Phonological and phonemic awareness prepares the brain for reading and spelling.
  3. The ability to notice and manipulate phonemes orally is essential for successful reading development.