New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Twelfth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Style, detail, expressive language, and genre create a well-crafted statement directed at an intended audience and purpose

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use a range of elaboration techniques (such as questioning, comparing, connecting, interpreting, analyzing, or describing) to establish and express point of view and theme
  2. Create a clear and coherent, logically consistent structure appropriate to the chosen literary genre (biographical account, short story, personal narrative, narrative poem or song, parody of particular narrative style, play script)
  3. Develop context, character/narrator motivation, problem/conflict and resolution, and descriptive details/examples to support and express theme
  4. Manipulate elements of style, imagery, tone, and point of view to appeal to the senses and emotions of the reader
  5. Critique own writing and the writing of others from the perspective of the intended audience to guide revisions, improve voice and style (word choice, sentence variety, figurative language) and achieve intended purpose and effect

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does figurative language enhance the writer's intended meaning?
  2. In what way is the setting a significant part of a text?
  3. How might events in a story be different if the setting were different?
  4. What literary genre best fits your interest and why?
  5. If you were invited to write a short story about an event in your life or that of another person, what would you write about and why?
  6. Who would your intended audience be for this piece of work?
  7. How are the lyrics of a song directed at a particular audience?

Relevance & Application:

  1. In an adapted film, screenwriters must effectively synthesize original, literary writing to produce an action-oriented screenplay.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers look for symbolism, connections, and other elaboration techniques.
  2. Writers increase their skill set in creating tone and imagery.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: WHST.11-12.1-6 and 10)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Ideas, evidence, structure, and style create persuasive, academic, and technical texts for particular audiences and specific purposes

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Articulate a position through a sophisticated claim or thesis statement and advance it using evidence, examples, and counterarguments
  2. Select appropriate and relevant information (excluding extraneous details) to set context
  3. Address audience needs and anticipate audience questions or misunderstandings
  4. Select and build context for language appropriate to content (technical, formal)
  5. Control and enhance the flow of ideas through transitional words or phrases appropriate to text structure
  6. Support judgments with substantial evidence and purposeful elaboration
  7. Draw a conclusion by synthesizing information
  8. Revise writing using feedback to maximize effect on audience and to calibrate purpose

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do writers select appropriate details to develop and support a strong thesis?
  2. Why is it important to identify audience needs and address counterarguments?
  3. Why is relevance a key element of technical writing?
  4. How is credibility of sources pertinent to academic or persuasive writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Writers can persuade readers and voice opinions through various forms of writing (such as an editorial for the school or local news source).
  2. Congressional representatives receive many letters from the public voicing their opinions and asking for change.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers prepare to write by thinking about their intended audience and the purpose of their work.
  2. Writers anticipate what questions may be asked or could be misunderstood with their topic and devote quality time to responding to these questions.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: WHST.11-12.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Tenth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Literary or narrative genres feature a variety of stylistic devices to engage or entertain an audience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.9-10.3)
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.9-10.2b)
    • Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.9-10.2d)
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. (CCSS: W.9-10.2e)
  2. Write literary and narrative texts using a range of stylistic devices (poetic techniques, figurative language, imagery, graphic elements) to support the presentation of implicit or explicit theme
  3. Use a variety of strategies to evaluate whether the writing is presented in a creative and reflective manner (e.g., reading the draft aloud, seeking feedback from a reviewer, scoring guides)
  4. Revise texts using feedback to enhance the effect on the reader and clarify the presentation of implicit or explicit theme

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes the final draft of a document look professional and polished?
  2. How does paragraph structure and formatting increase the clarity of the writer's message?
  3. What style do you find most useful to you as a writer? Why?
  4. Why is it important to keep an audience engaged?
  5. What would happen if the audience was bored or uninterested in a piece?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Audience members like to be entertained by different genres, including comedy, drama, and action.
  2. Consumers lose interest in text that is boring and uneventful.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers try to anticipate what the counterarguments of their topic may be.
  2. Writers find new ways to increase writing effectiveness by working to infuse more elegance in their wording and sentence fluency.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: WHST.9-10.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Stylistic devices and descriptive details in literary and narrative texts are organized for a variety of audiences and purposes and evaluated for quality

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.8.3)
    • Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. (CCSS: W.8.3a)
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.8.3b)
    • Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events. (CCSS: W.8.3c)
    • Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. (CCSS: W.8.3d)
    • Establish and maintain a controlling idea appropriate to audience and purpose
    • Integrate the use of organizing techniques that break up sequential presentation of chronology in a story (use of foreshadowing; starting in the middle of the action, then filling in background information using flashbacks)
    • Write using poetic techniques (alliteration, onomatopoeia); figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole); and graphic elements (capital letters, line length, word position) for intended effect
    • Express voice and tone and influence readers' perceptions by varying vocabulary, sentence structure, and descriptive details
    • Use mentor text/authors to help craft appropriate technique
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. (CCSS: W.8.3e)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the elements of a well-developed character?
  2. Why is visual imagery a skill that an author uses to create tone?
  3. What makes characters interesting to the reader?
  4. How does foreshadowing create connections for the reader?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Readers who study key story elements will enhance their work as writers.
  2. People who monitor what they are reading and attend to how a text is organized become more organized writers.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers realize the importance and relevance of the setting.
  2. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: WHST.6-8.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Composing literary and narrative texts that incorporate a range of stylistic devices demonstrates knowledge of genre features

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.7.3)
    • Use a variety of planning strategies to generate and organize ideas (such as brainstorming, mapping, graphic organizers)
    • Write using poetic techniques (alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme, repetition); figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification); and graphic elements (capital letters, line length, word position) typical of the chosen genre
    • Use a range of appropriate genre features (engaging plot, dialogue, stanza breaks) to develop and organize texts
    • Establish a central idea, define a clear focus for each section of the text (paragraphs, verses), and use transitional words and phrases to link ideas and sections
    • Decide on the content and placement of descriptive and sensory details within the text to address the targeted audience and purpose
    • Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. (CCSS: W.7.3a)
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.7.3b)
    • Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. (CCSS: W.7.3c)
    • Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. (CCSS: W.7.3d)
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. (CCSS: W.7.3e)
  2. Revise writing to strengthen the clarity and vividness of voice, tone, and ideas

Inquiry Questions:

  1. In what ways does an author use the setting to create a mood for the story?
  2. What inferences can a reader make about different character types? What aids help make that inference?
  3. Why do organized events require a particular sequence?
  4. How might the outcome have been different if the character had made a different decision?
  5. What visual clues does a writer give about the setting of a story by using only the words of the text?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Readers who think about character traits make deeper connections to what they are reading.
  2. Magazines and comic books rely heavily on engaging plot, graphic elements, and poetic technique.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers know the story elements to help them organize thinking as they craft their own stories.
  2. Writers use figurative language, metaphor, and other techniques in their writing.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: WHST.6-8.1-6 and 10)