New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eleventh Grade
Standard: 4. Research and Reasoning

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Complex situations require critical thinking across multiple disciplines

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze the logic of complex situations by questioning the purpose, question at issue, information, points of view, implications and consequences inferences, assumptions and concepts
  2. Evaluate strengths and weaknesses of their logic and logic of others by using criteria including relevance, clarity, accuracy, fairness, significance, depth, breadth, logic and precision
  3. Determine the extent to which they entered empathetically into competing points of view, exercised confidence in reason, recognized the limits of their knowledge on the topic (intellectual humility), explored alternative approaches to solving or addressing complex problems (intellectual flexibility), and were open to constructive critique (intellectual open-mindedness)
  4. Analyze and assess the logic of the interdisciplinary domains inherent in reasoning through complex situations
  5. Monitor and assess the extent to which their own beliefs and biases influenced their reactions to the viewpoints and logic of others

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do readers determine if the author(s) they are using are credible, biased on a topic or have a neutral, unbiased approach?
  2. As they read from multiple texts and across disciplines, how do people organize their thinking for depth of content understanding?
  3. Are there any disciplines of study which do not require critical thinking?
  4. When does logic undermine a discipline?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Presenters organize information and present it to others around a point of view.
  2. In the media world, people are bombarded with many pieces of information. Keen observing skills to sift through information for clarity, bias, and relevance help one to discriminate good information from faulty input when making informed decisions.
  3. Writers have strong influence on others' thinking. Good professors help students expand the ability to critically think and foster intellectual humility.
  4. Reading and participating in blogs give practice in applying critical thinking through the engagement with an authentic audience.

Nature Of:

  1. Researchers must be flexible with their thinking, so new learning can take place.
  2. When researchers analyze and assess thinking, they attempt to be fair-minded and look for connections to other content areas.
  3. Investigative intellects can transform their ideas when being flexible, open-minded, empathetic, humble and confident in reason.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 4. Research and Reasoning

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Reasoned material is evaluated for its quality using both its logic and its use of a medium

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify low-credibility stories by noticing vested interests or passion associated with content
  2. Obtain useful information from standard news stories
  3. Identify the purpose(s) or agenda of media presentations
  4. Consider alternative perspectives of media presentations

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What point(s) of view is (are) being dismissed or played down?
  2. How can people gain access to the point of view being negated (from those who most intelligently understand it)?
  3. How does using multiple perspectives and points of view expand people's thinking?
  4. What makes a story have low credibility?
  5. What makes a story or text have high credibility?
  6. What makes a presentation have clarity for the audience?
  7. How are people influenced by something in the news?
  8. What are the implications if people receive poor, unreliable information? How does that influence the quality of thinking?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Readers can identify low-credibility stories by noticing vested interests or passions associated with content experts.
  2. Consumers identify the purpose(s) or agenda of media presentations.
  3. Making fair-minded, informed decisions will help citizens contribute to society in a quality manner.
  4. Awards are given to a well-reasoned documentary about issues.
  5. Entertainment that is precise like judging games need legitimate processes to be seen as fun and credible.
  6. Voting booths, focus group tools, and electronic surveys take a reasoned series of questions and trap feedback, opinions, and choices.

Nature Of:

  1. The quality of thinking impacts people's lives.
  2. For thinking to improve, people must ask critical questions.
  3. Researchers ask themselves the questions, "What is the source for this information? Is it credible? How do I know that?"

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 4. Research and Reasoning

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Assumptions can be concealed, and require identification and evaluation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Accurately identify own assumptions, as well as those of others
  2. Make assumptions that are consistent with one another
  3. Identify the natural tendency in humans to use stereotypes, prejudices, biases, and distortions
  4. Identify stereotypes, prejudices, biases, and distortions in self and thinking of others
  5. Accurately state the assumptions underlying the inferences they or others make, and then accurately assess those assumptions for justifiability

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do assumptions shape people's thinking?
  2. What assumptions do you have about your friends?
  3. What are the implications of someone's assumptions when meeting a new person?
  4. How do biases interfere with critical thinking?
  5. Describe a time when recognized that you had a bias?
  6. What assumption did you have about this class at the beginning of the year? How has that assumption changed?
  7. When is an assumption helpful?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When reading, personal assumptions affect how a reader understands and interprets the text.
  2. Helping ourselves be aware of biases will assist us in becoming productive, open-minded citizens.
  3. Historians shift their perspectives (different from their own) to analyze a situation.
  4. Good architects question their own thinking or actions to avoid making unsupported inferences or conclusions about the properties of new building materials.

Nature Of:

  1. Researchers know the quality of thinking impacts their lives and the lives of others.
  2. Researchers know that assessing their assumptions is important as they make daily decisions.
  3. All reasoning is based on assumptions.
  4. For thinking to improve, it is necessary to ask critical questions.
  5. Assessing their assumptions is important as people make daily decisions.