New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

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Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Twelfth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Literary criticism of complex texts requires the use of analysis, interpretive, and evaluative strategies

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact. (CCSS: RL.11-12.5)
  2. Describe and contrast characteristics of specific literary movements and perspectives
  3. Evaluate the influence of historical context on the form, style, and point of view of a written work
  4. Analyze and relate a literary work to source documents of its literary period or to critical perspectives
  5. Evaluate how literary components impact meaning (such as tone, symbolism, irony, extended metaphor, satire, hyperbole)
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of classical foundational works of world literature
  7. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently. (CCSS: RL.11-12.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What specific techniques in a classic text elicit historic attention or appreciation? Why?
  2. What specific techniques in a modern text deserve critical attention or appreciation? Why?
  3. What strategies are most useful when reading, understanding, and making personal connections to literary texts?
  4. Is literary criticism based on skepticism or something else?
  5. How can students compare their family or individual beliefs to those of the historical period they are currently studying?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Interpretation of text, supported by citing evidence, fosters reading skills and coherent thinking, speaking, and writing, which are priority skills for the workplace and postsecondary settings.
  2. Book reviewers and editors who make their living commenting and advancing the body of good reading interpret and judge new writing so that we all enjoy high-quality magazines, books, and online reading.
  3. Screen writers and theatre writers use symbolism, hyperbole, and satire to make audiences laugh, think, or display feelings.

Nature Of:

  1. Strong readers critically think about what they read and apply background knowledge.
  2. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: RST.11-12.1-10)
  3. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: RH.11-12.1-10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Purpose, tone, and meaning in word choices influence literary, persuasive, and informational texts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. (CCSS: L.7.4)
    • Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. (CCSS: L.7.4a)
    • Use the tone of a passage to determine an approximate meaning of a word
    • Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel). (CCSS: L.7.4b)
    • Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. (CCSS: L.7.4c)
    • Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). (CCSS: L.7.4d)
    • Differentiate between primary and secondary meanings of words
  2. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (CCCS: L.7.5)
    • Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context. (CCCS: L.7.5a)
    • Understand that language represents and constructs how readers perceive events, people, groups, and ideas; recognize positive and negative implications of language and identify how it can affect readers in different ways
    • Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words. (CCCS: L.7.5b)
    • Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending). (CCCS: L.7.5c)
  3. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. (CCSS: L.7.6)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is the use of the Greek root "thermo" significant in today's world?
  2. When a word has multiple meanings or pronunciations, how does a reader select the correct one? (For example, I want to contract with that person to detail my car. I hope I don't contract the flu.)
  3. What power do words have?
  4. How do people adjust the words they use in different contexts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Prefixes from Greek and Latin are often found in words used in science and social studies books. Knowing the meaning of these roots and affixes will support strong vocabulary knowledge.
  2. People use words differently in different contexts (The word "he" is used to refer to women as well; we text people with different language than we use when we write a formal letter.)
  3. Online access to primary sources and historic newspaper collections allow one ample opportunity to apply understanding of word choice.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers infer meanings as well as understand words with multiple meanings by applying understanding of Greek and Latin roots.
  2. Readers adjust understanding when they consider historical or social contexts.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Understanding the meaning within different types of literature depends on properly analyzing literary components

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (CCSS: RL.6.1)
    • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. (CCSS: RL.6.2)
    • Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. (CCSS: RL.6.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. (CCSS: RL.6.4)
    • Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. (CCSS: RL.6.5)
    • Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text. (CCSS: RL.6.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they "see" and "hear" when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch. (CCSS: RL.6.7)
    • Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics. (CCSS: RL.6.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RL.6.10)
  5. Use different kinds of questions to clarify and extend comprehension
  6. Identify how the author uses dialogue and specific word choice to achieve an effect

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does understanding the author's purpose help readers comprehend the text?
  2. How do specific words help readers visualize a scene? How does understanding the author's word choice contribute to imagery?
  3. How do different characters represent different points of view?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When readers become aware of how an author writes, they can increase their own sentence fluency when they are writing. (Comic books are creative genres that use dialogue, mood, and setting to entertain or make a point.)
  2. Readers choose literary texts based on author's style, personal connections, desire to expand their world view, and interest.
  3. Sometimes one can access authors online via tools such as Skype, Facebook, and blogs to gain insight into the writer's purpose.

Nature Of:

  1. When readers pay attention to how an author uses language, they increase their reading fluency and comprehension.
  2. Readers use the same skills they have gleaned from some of their favorite authors when they write.
  3. Readers who analyze characters' responses to different situations can respond more flexibly to their own situations.
  4. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: RST.6-8.1-10)
  5. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: RH.6-8.1-10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Literary texts are understood and interpreted using a range of strategies

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use pre-reading strategies, such as identifying a purpose for reading, generating questions to answers while reading, previewing sections of texts and activating prior knowledge
  2. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (CCSS: RL.5.1)
    • Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. (CCSS: RL.5.2)
    • Compare and contrast two or more character's points of view, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact). (CCSS: RL.5.3)
  3. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. (CCSS: RL.5.4)
    • Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms, homographs) to better understand each of the words. (CCSS: L.5.5c)
    • Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem. (CCSS: RL.5.5)
    • Describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences how events are described. (CCSS: RL.5.6)
    • Locate information to support opinions, predictions, inferences, and identification of the author's message or theme
    • Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g. dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems. (CCSS: L.5.3b)
  4. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem). (CCSS: RL.5.7)
    • Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics. (CCSS: RL.5.9)
    • Use knowledge of literary devices (such as imagery, rhythm, foreshadowing, simple metaphors) to understand and respond to text.
  5. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (CCSS: RL.5.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When are thinking strategies important?
  2. How do readers adjust reading strategies to better understand different texts? What does it mean to be flexible?
  3. How are literary texts similar? How are they different?
  4. Why does point of view matter? How does it contribute to conflict? How can understanding point of view reduce conflict?
  5. If readers could remove inference skills from a person, what would be the consequences?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Comprehension skills help us question the author's purpose and view the world with a critical eye (using persuasion to influence our decisions and choices).
  2. Acknowledging multiple points of view help people as they meet and work with others.
  3. Foreshadowing is a skill that helps people prepare for future events because it creates a fundamental readiness.
  4. Authors use words to create pictures for the reader. As readers become aware of visual imagery, they increase their comprehension and use of metacognition.
  5. Graphical and multimedia elements of online text provide additional context and structural clues to increase comprehension.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers think about the characters and their traits and how they relate to each other.
  2. Readers recognize big ideas in literary text that reflect the human experience.
  3. Readers are always thinking about the words the author uses to paint pictures.