New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. The recursive writing process contributes to the creative and unique literary genres for a variety of audiences and purposes

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. (CCSS: W.5.3)
    • Create personal and fictional narratives with a strong personal voice
    • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. (CCSS: W.5.3a)
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. (CCSS: W.5.3b)
    • Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. (CCSS: W.5.3c)
    • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. (CCSS: W.5.3d)
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. (CCSS: W.5.3e)
  2. Write poems using poetic techniques (alliteration, onomatopoeia); figurative language (simile, metaphor); and graphic elements (capital letters, line length)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can the use of correct vocabulary, grammar, usage, and mechanics add clarity to writing?
  2. How can various tools help a writer edit and revise written work?
  3. What do authors do to ensure that they have a topic and supporting details?
  4. How do graphic organizers or planning guides increase the effectiveness of a writer?
  5. What is the primary message that the author wants readers to interpret from the passage? Where is the evidence from the text?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Writing about personal experiences is an important step in expression.
  2. Including story elements in writing provides the reader with a more complete product.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers use all of the elements of a good story in their writing and have created a systematic plan for including each of them.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The recursive writing process creates stronger informational and persuasive texts for a variety of audiences and purposes

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. (CCSS: W.5.1)
    • Include cause and effect, opinions, and other opposing viewpoints in persuasive writing
    • Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer's purpose. (CCSS: W.5.1a)
    • Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details. (CCSS: W.5.1b)
    • Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically). (CCSS: W.5.1c)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. (CCSS: W.5.1d)
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. (CCSS: W.5.2)
    • Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.5.2a)
    • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. (CCSS: W.5.2b)
    • Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially). (CCSS: W.5.2c)
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (CCSS: W.5.2d)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. (CCSS: W.5.2e)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the purpose of writing for different audiences?
  2. How does revising writing build new skills for writers?
  3. How did people gather information before the use of computers?
  4. If someone asked you the fastest, most efficient way to gather information about ________, what would you tell them and why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Successful writing has specific organizational features, style, and craft elements. (Write a persuasive letter to an adult using mature tone and vocabulary. Select a planning guide that will be useful to plan writing.)
  2. Technology is used to assist in locating resources to support writers' work.
  3. Learning to summarize and write brief explanations is a lifelong skill that that will carry over into the workplace or college.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers think about the audience that they are writing for to help them organize their thoughts.
  2. Writers use technology as part of their resources to be more organized and thorough when they write.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. The recursive writing process is used to create a variety of literary genres for an intended audience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. (CCSS: W.4.1)
    • Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. (CCSS: W.4.1a)
    • Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. (CCSS: W.4.1b)
    • Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). (CCSS: W.4.1c)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. (CCSS: W.4.1d)
  2. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. (CCSS: W.4.3)
    • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. (CCSS: W.4.3a)
    • Choose planning strategies to support text structure and intended outcome
    • Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. (CCSS: W.4.3b)
    • Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. (CCSS: W.4.3c)
    • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. (CCSS: W.4.3d)
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. (CCSS: W.4.3e)
  3. Write poems that express ideas or feelings using imagery, figurative language, and sensory details

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are literary genres different in form and substance?
  2. How does a graphic organizer assist a writer?
  3. How does writing create a visual image for the reader?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Different forms of literary genre can express the same ideas in different ways.
  2. Learning to write with strong words will increase how readers will perceive the messages writers are trying to convey. (Write about an event using formal and informal language.)
  3. Writers who connect their personal experiences to writing will increase their skills.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers include personal experiences in their writing.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Informational and persuasive texts use the recursive writing process

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. (CCSS: W.4.2)
    • Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.4.2a)
    • Choose planning strategies to support text structure and intended outcome
    • Identify a text structure appropriate to purpose (sequence, chronology, description, explanation, comparison-and-contrast
    • Organize relevant ideas and details to convey a central idea or prove a point
    • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. (CCSS: W.4.2b)
    • Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). (CCSS: W.4.2c)
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (CCSS: W.4.2d)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. (CCSS: W.4.2e)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which tools are available to assist the writer in planning, drafting, and revising personal writing?
  2. How is word choice affected by audience and purpose?
  3. How are writers persuasive without being biased?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When preparing for a presentation writers can use electronic resources to add graphics and visual effects to a project.
  2. Businesses use proposals to persuade consumers to buy their products.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers use transition words in their writing to make transitions clearer and easier to follow.
  2. Writers will sometimes use a visual that will help convey their message.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. A writing process is used to plan, draft, and write a variety of literary genres

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. (CCSS: W.3.1)
    • Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons. (CCSS: W.3.1a)
    • Provide reasons that support the opinion. (CCSS: W.3.1b)
    • Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons. (CCSS: W.3.1c)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section. (CCSS: W.3.1d)
    • Brainstorm ideas for writing
  2. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. (CCSS: W.3.3)
    • Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. (CCSS: W.3.3a)
    • Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. (CCSS: W.3.3b)
    • Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. (CCSS: W.3c)
    • Provide a sense of closure. (CCSS: W.3.3d)
  3. Write descriptive poems using figurative language

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can thoughts and ideas be organized to prepare for writing?
  2. When are transition words appropriate to use in writing?
  3. What is a primary use of a graphic organizer?
  4. When people brainstorm, why do they write down all ideas without judgment?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Authors choose graphic organizers appropriate for the purpose of their writing and utilize the information to create a well-written piece.
  2. Writers/authors present points of view to inform, entertain, and communicate a variety of ideas and opinions and to understand that language has a clear beginning, middle, and end.
  3. Ghost stories and mysteries often are written with the outcome in mind.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers know that a story needs a beginning, middle, and end.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. A writing process is used to plan, draft, and write a variety of informational texts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. (CCSS: W.3.2)
    • Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.3.2a)
    • State main ideas and include sufficient details or facts for appropriate depth of information (naming, describing, explaining, comparing, use of visual images)
    • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. (CCSS: W.3.2b)
    • Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information. (CCSS: W.3c)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section. (CCSS: W.3.2d)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do transitions support fluent writing?
  2. Why is it necessary to connect ideas when writing?
  3. How do authors know what information is accurate?
  4. How do authors know what information is credible?
  5. Why would it be important for authors to label illustrations, photos, graphs, charts, or other media?
  6. What forms of writing assist writers in sharing information?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Reporters and journalists will sometimes write about one topic from different points of view.
  2. Today there is so much information; people need skills to help them sort the information and make sense of it so it can be useful.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers can describe events or people fluently.
  2. Writers summarize information by using only the important details.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Exploring the writing process helps to plan and draft a variety of literary genres

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section. (CCSS: W.2.1)
  2. Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure. (CCSS: W.2.3)
  3. Organize ideas using pictures, graphic organizers, or story maps
  4. Write simple, descriptive poems
  5. Write with precise nouns, active verbs, and descriptive adjectives
  6. Use a knowledge of structure and crafts of various forms of writing gained through reading and listening to mentor texts
  7. Develop characters both internally (thoughts and feelings) and externally (physical features, expressions, clothing)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are different literary genres different in form and substance?
  2. What are two characteristics of the person you are describing?
  3. Why do short poems still have an important message?
  4. How do planning frames (graphic organizers, lists, photos, or drawings) help writers as they write a story?
  5. How do authors collect topics for writing?
  6. How might authors create an inviting beginning and satisfying ending?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Authors will write funny poems and short stories for readers to enjoy.
  2. Parents like to read fairy tales to their children before they go to bed.
  3. The ability to read and understand poems and fictional stories will assist in building metacognition, which will aid in comprehending harder text.
  4. Creative approaches to writing and story craft distinguish best-selling authors from ordinary writers.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers think about character traits to help them include more interesting details in their writing.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Exploring the writing process helps to plan and draft a variety of simple informational texts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section. (CCSS: W.2.2)
  2. Write letters and "how-to's" (procedures, directions, recipes) that follow a logical order and appropriate format
  3. Organize informational texts using main ideas and specific supporting details
  4. Organize ideas using a variety of pictures, graphic organizers or bulleted lists
  5. Use relevant details when responding in writing to questions about texts
  6. State a focus when responding to a given question, and use details from text to support a given focus
  7. Apply appropriate transition words to writing

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are different forms of informational writing?
  2. Why is it important to writers to know who will be reading their work?
  3. How is report writing different from storytelling?
  4. How do writers use technology to support the writing process?
  5. How do authors stay focused on one topic throughout a piece of writing?
  6. How might technology impact the writing process for informational texts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Cooks write their recipes step-by-step so the readers can follow the directions easily.
  2. Parents write to their children who live far away using conventional and digital means.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers use their own experiences in their writing to make connections.
  2. Writers work with peers to create organized pieces of writing.
  3. Writers plan and organize information with their audience and purpose in mind.
  4. Writers reread and revise while drafting.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Exploring the writing process develops ideas for writing texts that carry meaning

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure. (CCSS: W.1.1)
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure. (CCSS: W.1.2)
  3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure. (CCSS: W.1.3)
  4. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed. (CCSS: W.1.5)
  5. Use pictures or graphic organizers to plan writing
  6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. (CCSS: W.1.6)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can thoughts and ideas be organized to prepare for writing?
  2. Why is it important to plan before beginning to write?
  3. How can a graphic organizer help writers plan their writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Graphic organizers help to plan writing projects.
  2. Simple sentences can be expanded using adjectives or phrases. (The boy plays. The strong boy plays. The strong boy plays in the sandbox.)
  3. Well-written thoughts are shared in a variety of ways (online communities, magazines, news stories).

Nature Of:

  1. Writers use language that has a clear beginning, middle, and end.
  2. Writers must express ideas clearly because the reader cannot ask the author for clarification.