New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Tenth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. (CCSS: W.9-10.2)
    • Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.9-10.2a)
    • Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic. (CCSS: W.9-10.2b)
    • Choose and develop an effective appeal
    • Collect, organize, and evaluate materials to support ideas
    • Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. (CCSS: W.9-10.2c)
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. (CCSS: W.9-10.2d)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. (CCSS: W.9-10.2e)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). (CCSS: W.9-10.2f)
    • Revise writing by evaluating relationship of central idea, evidence, and organizational pattern
    • Explain how writers use organization and details to communicate their purposes
    • Present writing to an authentic audience and gauge effect on audience for intended purpose

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a writer organize writing to convey the intended message?
  2. What is the primary audience for this type of writing? Why?
  3. What would writing be like without figurative language?
  4. Why is it important that language match the audience being addressed?
  5. What are the implications of using language that may not match an audience?
  6. How does a writer determine the purpose of his/her writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Learning different purposes for writing increases an author's effectiveness.
  2. Researchers synthesize information from a variety of sources to present ideas.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers are purposeful in what they say, in how they develop the topic, and in the words they choose. The empowerment of being an author is exciting!
  2. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: WHST.9-10.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Ninth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Literary and narrative texts develop a controlling idea or theme with descriptive and expressive language

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.9-10.3)
    • Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. (CCSS: W.9-10.3a)
    • Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole. (CCSS: W.9-10.3c)
  2. Write literary and narrative texts using a range of poetic techniques, figurative language, and graphic elements to engage or entertain the intended audience
  3. Refine the expression of voice and tone in a text by selecting and using appropriate vocabulary, sentence structure, and sentence organization
  4. Review and revise ideas and development in substantive ways to improve the depth of ideas and vividness of supporting details
  5. Explain strengths and weaknesses of own writing and the writing of others using criteria (e.g., checklists, scoring guides)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does descriptive language make writing more appealing to the readers?
  2. Would people want to read texts that have no organizational structure? Why?
  3. Why is it important for authors to be able to develop texts that have an organized theme?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Consumers enjoy reading books with rich, descriptive language so they can picture what they are reading.
  2. Reporters and columnists at newspapers accept improvements in their writing to improve their work.
  3. Business workers are self-directed and rewarded for their efforts when they refine their writing to engage the reader.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers use descriptive language in their texts to make them more appealing to the reader.
  2. Writers know that revision, editing comments, and feedback strengthen a text.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: WHST.9-10.1-6 and 10)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Informational and persuasive texts develop a topic and establish a controlling idea or thesis with relevant support

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. (CCSS: W.9-10.1)
    • Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. (CCSS: W.9-10.1a)
    • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns. (CCSS: W.9-10.1b)
    • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. (CCSS: W.9-10.1c)
    • Use appropriate rhetorical appeals and genre to engage and guide the intended audience
    • Anticipate and address readers' biases and expectations
    • Revise ideas and structure to improve depth of information and logic of organization
    • Explain and imitate emotional, logical, and ethical appeals used by writers who are trying to persuade an audience
    • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. (CCSS: W.9-10.1d)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. (CCSS: W.9-10.1e)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should an author plan with clarity what the reader is expecting in the piece?
  2. How does an author monitor his/her work if the author is biased? What clues make the reader sense bias?
  3. What makes a descriptive text appeal to certain audiences?
  4. Why is it essential to explain technical terms and notations in writing?
  5. Do all audiences need this type of explanation? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Authors share ideas with a wider audience through writing.
  2. Researchers often submit an article stating their opinion about a current topic.
  3. Legal representatives prepare an argument by researching both sides and persuading an audience to one point of view by controlling one main idea.
  4. Rhetoric and ethical texts explain information with relevant supporting ideas.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers anticipate how biases play a role in the writing process. They try to think about readers and how they may perceive what the author is writing.
  2. Writers use different techniques to effectively support their arguments.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: WHST.9-10.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Pictures express ideas

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Draw pictures to generate, represent, and express ideas or share information
  2. Orally describe or tell about a picture
  3. Use shapes, letter-like symbols, and letters to represent words or ideas
  4. Dictate ideas to an adult

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What do pictures tell us about this tale?
  2. How is color used to help describe the story?
  3. When are symbols like clues in a game?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Good readers can tell others about what they have just read (or heard).
  2. Telling others about the characters helps readers understand more about the people in the stories.
  3. Writers like to take picture walks through their books and tell others what the story is about.

Nature Of:

  1. Beginning writers know how to spell many simple words because they know the sounds the letters make.
  2. Letters are symbols used to represent speech sounds.
  3. Sounds in spoken words map to letters in printed words.
  4. Learning to share ideas is important so people know what others are thinking.