New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eleventh Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Complex literary texts require critical reading approaches to effectively interpret and evaluate meaning

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. (CCSS: RL.11-12.1)
    • Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. (CCSS: RL.11-12.2)
    • Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). (CCSS: RL.11-12.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) (CCSS: RL.11-12.4)
    • Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). (CCSS: RL.11-12.6)
    • Explain the influence of historical context on the form, style, and point of view of a written work
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.) (CCSS: RL.11-12.7)
    • Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics. (CCSS: RL.11-12.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RL.11-12.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Which character from the current text do you most identify with and why?
  2. Why did the author choose this particular setting for this story?
  3. How might this story have been different with another setting?
  4. How does living in the 18th and 19th centuries compare with life in the 21st century?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Capturing the stories and culture of ancestors through American literature is the role of most periodical writers, historians, and sports writers.
  2. Exposure to diverse authors and genres of literature enhances readers' perspectives.
  3. Online book clubs, blog sites, and storytellers depend on ever better literary text strategies to find and share meaning in stories.
  4. Electronic spreadsheets and online storyboarding are effective tools for comparing and contrasting, tone, metaphor and theme development.

Nature Of:

  1. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: RST.11-12.1-10)
  2. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: RH.11-12.1-10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Quality comprehension and interpretation of literary texts demand self-monitoring and self-assessment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (CCSS: RL.8.1)
    • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. (CCSS: RL.8.2)
    • Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision. (CCSS: RL.8.3)
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. (CCSS: RL.8.4)
    • Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. (CCSS: RL.8.5)
    • Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor. (CCSS: RL.8.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors. (CCSS: RL.8.7)
    • Use graphic organizers and note-taking formats while reading to map relationships among implied or explicit ideas or viewpoints
    • Develop and share interpretations of literary works of personal interest
    • Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new. (CCSS: RL.8.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. (CCSS: RL.8.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What motivates you to keep reading a book?
  2. How do authors develop theme?
  3. How do authors convey mood?
  4. How do different authors approach story elements?
  5. Why does a particular literary work hold value for someone?

Relevance & Application:

  1. On a daily basis, people are confronted with multiple points of view. Analyzing viewpoints and perspectives will help them see both sides of an issue.
  2. Having the opportunity to explore a variety of authors and literature will expand personal interest and choice of reading.
  3. Dialoging with others in book clubs and via social networking sites for books such as Shelfari and Library Thing allow students to explore other points of view around literature.

Nature Of:

  1. Readers are able to connect with author's style, tone, and mood to support their own personal selections.
  2. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: RST.6-8.1-10)
  3. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: RH.6-8.1-10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Reading for All Purposes

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Literary elements, characteristics, and ideas are interrelated and guide the comprehension of literary and fictional texts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use Key Ideas and Details to:
    • Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. (CCSS: RL.7.1)
    • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. (CCSS: RL.7.2)
    • Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). (CCSS: RL.7.3)
    • Recognize the influence of setting on other narrative elements
  2. Use Craft and Structure to:
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama. (CCSS: RL.7.4)
    • Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning. (CCSS: RL.7.5)
    • Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. (CCSS: RL.7.6)
  3. Use Integration of Knowledge and Ideas to:
    • Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film). (CCSS: RL.7.7)
    • Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. (CCSS: RL.7.9)
  4. Use Range of Reading and Complexity of Text to:
    • By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (CCSS: RL.7.10)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How would changing the setting, character, plot, or point of view affect the outcome of a story?
  2. How do authors appeal to the reader's emotions and beliefs?
  3. What makes characters come alive?
  4. What creates conflict? What resolves it?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Exposure to literary text allows readers to connect to possibilities, points of view, and opportunities in the world.
  2. Digital storytelling introduces visual and multimedia elements that can enhance student understanding of literary texts.

Nature Of:

  1. Different readers respond differently to texts due to personal attitudes and beliefs about events, ideas, and themes. Readers may or may not like a particular text and they can explain why.
  2. Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: RST.6-8.1-10)
  3. Reading Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: RH.6-8.1-10)