New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eleventh Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Verbal and nonverbal cues impact the intent of communication

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Give informal talks using an appropriate level of formality of verbal language and nonverbal interaction with audience
  2. Deliver formal oral presentations for intended purpose and audience, using effective verbal and nonverbal communication
  3. Deliver oral talks with clear enunciation, vocabulary, and appropriate organization; nonverbal gestures; and tone
  4. Analyze audience responses to evaluate how effectively the talk or presentation met the purpose
  5. Identify, explain, and use content-specific vocabulary, terminology, dialect, or jargon unique to particular groups, perspectives, or contexts (such as social, professional, political, cultural, historical or geographical)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. In what ways can speakers effectively engage audiences throughout a presentation?
  2. How are speaking, listening, and responding skills used during an effective presentation?
  3. What can speakers learn about their own presentation skills from listening to and critiquing the presentations of others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Tone and eye contact can negatively influence an outcome.
  2. Verbal and nonverbal cues can build or destroy the trust of an individual or an audience.
  3. Real-time feedback technologies can provide nonverbal cues and systematic information regarding a speaker's degree of impact or persuasion on an audience.
  4. Electronic tools, for example pod casts or video conferencing, can allow deliver to and feedback from a diverse audience.
  5. World travelers often use nonverbal cues to communicate needs.
  6. Forensic and debate techniques frequently self-correct to gain the favor of an audience's judgment.

Nature Of:

  1. Great presenters are accustomed to public speaking.
  2. Great presenters think about what types of language (formal or informal) they need to use to convey a message.
  3. Audience analysis is critical to being understood and credible.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Effective communication requires speakers to express an opinion, provide information, describe a process, and persuade an audience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe a process and persuade an audience
    • Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes. (CCSS: SL.5.4)
    • Use appropriate eye contact and speak clearly at an understandable pace. (CCSS: SL.5.4)
  2. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. (CCSS: SL.5.5)
  3. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks. (CCSS: SL.5.6)
  4. Adapt language as appropriate to purpose: to persuade, explain/provide information, or express an opinion.

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do presenters make themselves clear when presenting ideas to others?
  2. How do presenters make a good impression when speaking with others?
  3. When presenters want to persuade audience members, what is important for them to remember?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Performing artists rehearse to perfect a performance before presenting to an audience.
  2. Video-recording and then viewing a presentation can help speakers understand what they do well and what they need to improve.
  3. Advertising agencies develop media campaigns (for TV, radio, the Internet, newspapers, and magazines) to persuade people to buy their products.
  4. Online resources offer samples of language use from diverse backgrounds.
  5. Webinars allow sharing among and between a broader audience.

Nature Of:

  1. Effective communicators can present a topic they know well and take the opposing side of an issue.
  2. Skilled presenters plan and prepare for the delivery of a presentation.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. A clear communication plan is necessary to effectively deliver and receive information

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. (CCSS: SL.4.1)
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. (CCSS: SL.4.1a)
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. (CCSS: SL.4.1b)
    • Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. (CCSS: SL.4.1c)
    • Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. (CCSS: SL.4.1d)
  2. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. (CCSS: SL.4.2)
  3. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points. (CCSS: SL.4.3)
  4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. (CCSS: SL.4.4)
  5. Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. (CCSS: SL.4.5)
  6. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (CCSS: SL.4.6)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is important to listen to all members in a group before making a decision about an issue or problem?
  2. What are some important things to do when presenting ideas to a group?
  3. Why is paraphrasing someone else's thinking important before sharing other opinions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Learning how to listen and support ideas with others is a life skill (Businesses of all sizes create communication plans so all employees are kept informed and know how and where to offer their opinion.)
  2. Interacting with others by sharing knowledge, ideas, stories, and interests builds positive relationships. For example, when planning a school festival students, parents, and teachers work together to develop ideas and plan the work.
  3. Using databases to organize information about and audience can improve a meeting.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators acknowledge the ideas of others.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Oral communication is used both informally and formally

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. (CCSS: SL.3.4)
  2. Distinguish different levels of formality
  3. Speak clearly, using appropriate volume and pitch for the purpose and audience
  4. Select and organize ideas sequentially or around major points of information that relate to the formality of the audience
  5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details. (CCSS: SL.3.5)
  6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (CCSS: SL.3.6)
  7. Use grammatically correct language for the audience and specific vocabulary to communicate ideas and supporting details

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do children talk differently to their friends than to their teachers? Why?
  2. Could presenters speak passionately about a topic if their back was turned to the audience?
  3. When people talk to someone who speaks a different language, how do they know that the person is happy, sad, scared, or mad?
  4. Why is it important to speak clearly with appropriate volume and pitch?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Participate in group discussions around a topic of interest. (Actors in a group scene must communicate the appropriate thoughts and feelings for the audience to understand their intent.)
  2. Speak at a rate and volume others can understand. (Television reporters demonstrate expertise in clearly presenting to an audience.)
  3. Use correct grammatical structures to clearly express new ideas to a group.
  4. Collaborate with a group for a presentation (such as a book report or dramatic reading).
  5. Electronic tools visual mapping tools can be used to organize ideas.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators make changes to their presentations based on the interests of different audiences.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Multiple strategies develop and expand oral vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. (CCSS: SL.1.4)
  2. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. (CCSS: SL.1.)
  3. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (CCSS: SL.1.6)
  4. Give and follow simple two-step directions.

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to learn new words?
  2. How is the meaning of a word demonstrated without speaking?
  3. How do presenters decide which words to use when they speak?
  4. What is the value of using different words in writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Choose specific words to make communication clearer. (Storytellers select their words very carefully to express a thought or feeling clearly to the audience or reader.)
  2. Use words to orally describe actions, people, places, things, and ideas. (Visual artists demonstrate the ability to express many words through a work of art. A picture is worth a thousand words.)
  3. Increase exposure to words for use in speaking and writing.
  4. Library database products can provide exposure to oral and written vocabulary.
  5. Electronic drawing tools can be used to illustrate vocabulary.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators use a variety of words when speaking and writing to demonstrate their understanding of a topic.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Verbal and nonverbal language is used to express and receive information

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. (CCSS: SL.1.1)
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). (CCSS: SL.1.1a)
    • Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges. (CCSS: SL.1.1b)
    • Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion. (CCSS: SL.1.1c)
  2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. (CCSS: SL.1.2)
  3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood. (CCSS: SL.1.3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does it mean to communicate courteously in conversations?
  2. How can students ask for something without speaking out in class?
  3. Why is it important for students to wait their turn before speaking?

Relevance & Application:

  1. By listening, responding to others' ideas, and working together people can solve problems together that may not have been solved by an individual.
  2. A variety of technology tools help people clarify a speaker's or author's meaning when listening or reading.

Nature Of:

  1. Communicators can ask for things they need without being disruptive.
  2. Communicators know how to communicate effectively with peers, teachers, and family members.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identifying and manipulating phonemes in spoken words allow people to understand the meaning of speech

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes). (CCSS: RF.1.2)
    • Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words. (CCSS: RF.1.2a)
    • Orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends. (CCSS: RF.1.2b)
    • Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words. (CCSS: RF.1.2c)
    • Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds (phonemes). (CCSS: RF.1.2d)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are phonemes (speech sounds) important?
  2. What is the difference between phonemes (speech sounds) and other sounds?
  3. How would English sound if we used letter sounds the same in every word?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Poets blend words and phrases together to produce poems that sound like feelings.
  2. Audio and digital technologies assist students in identifying the differences among types of sounds.
  3. When learning a new language, students must learn how that language uses speech sounds before they can speak fluently.

Nature Of:

  1. Phonological and phonemic awareness prepares the brain for reading and spelling.
  2. The ability to notice and manipulate phonemes orally is essential for successful reading development.
  3. Good speakers notice and manipulate phonemes to make their presentation interesting and understandable to their audience.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Oral communication skills are built within a language-rich environment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail. (CCSS: SL.K.4)
  2. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail. (CCSS: SL.K.5)
  3. Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly. (CCSS: SL.K.6)
  4. Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent. (CCSS: L.K.5a)
  5. Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites (antonyms). (CCSS: L.K.5b)
  6. Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at school that are colorful). (CCSS: L.K.5c)
  7. Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general action (e.g., walk, march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings. (CCSS: L.K.5d)
  8. Express words and word meanings as encountered in books and conversation
  9. Use new vocabulary that is directly taught through reading, speaking, and listening
  10. Relate new vocabulary to prior knowledge

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why are the sounds and letters in words important?
  2. Why is it important to learn new words and build speaking vocabularies?
  3. When talking to a partner, why is important to speak clearly and use words the person understands?
  4. How would the world be different if people didn't speak to each other?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Provide opportunities and tools for students to see and use written language for a variety of purposes, drawing attention to specific letters and words. (Early math concepts require a student to identify and sort common shapes and identify simple patterns.)
  2. Electronic sources provide a tool for displaying word and letters.
  3. Animation can enhance story telling.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators seek out opportunities to learn and use new words that build and enhance their oral language skills.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 1. Oral Expression and Listening

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Conceptual understanding conveyed through vocabulary words can occur using a variety of modalities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and sort common objects, events, pictures, words, colors, shapes, and textures into various classifications
  2. Begin to identify and use special concepts (first/last, over/under, etc.)
  3. Demonstrate use of vocabulary in oral language to express ideas and events
  4. Begin to understand that everyday words such as "cold" relate to extended vocabulary words such as "chilly"

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the names of different people (teacher, principal, assistant, classmate, lunch lady) in the school?
  2. What are the names of people in the community, friends, and relatives?
  3. How many words do you know that have an opposite?
  4. What is your favorite kind of story? One you know already or one you make up? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Develop vocabulary to effectively express feelings and thoughts, describe experiences, interact with others, and communicate their needs. (In PE or dance class, it is important to listen to directional instructions (first/last, over/under). Visual artists must understand the functions of color, shape, and texture when creating a piece of artwork.)
  2. Electronic mapping tools can be used in sorting and organizing ideas.

Nature Of:

  1. Good communicators use words of time and position, including first, second, next, on, under, beside, and over, to give directions orally.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Listening and comprehension skills are required to be clearly understood

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use language to express ideas in complete sentences (with support of sentence stems as needed)
  2. Recite songs, poems, and stories with repeated rhyme
  3. Listen with comprehension, and follow two-step directions
  4. Remember spoken information for a short period of time

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does asking questions help people understand the world?
  2. Can people sing a story?
  3. How do people remember things?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Rhythm patterns using music or dance facilitate memorization.
  2. Emergency workers rely on citizens following directions so everyone remains safe.
  3. Digital media allows students to organize their thoughts into pictures.

Nature Of:

  1. People communicate to understand and to be understood.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Early knowledge of phonemic awareness is the building block of understanding language

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize patterns of sounds in songs, storytelling, and poetry
  2. Understand that words are made up of one or more syllables
  3. Recognize rhyming words and alliterations
  4. Demonstrate understanding of initial sounds in words (such as mop begins with the /m/ sound)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is important to recognize patterns in oral language?
  2. Why is it important to hear sounds in words?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Song lyrics using meter and rhyme use patterns of words to create music.
  2. Sounds of words are highlighted and exaggerated for better understanding in video prepared games and shows

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to segment and blend phonemes facilitates spelling and decoding.
  2. Phonological and phonemic awareness prepares the brain for reading and spelling.
  3. The ability to notice and manipulate phonemes orally is essential for successful reading development.