New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Tenth Grade
Standard: 4. Research and Reasoning

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose solutions, or share findings and conclusions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. (CCSS: W.9-10.7)
  2. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. (CCSS: W.9-10.8)
  3. Formulate research questions that are clear and precise
  4. Identify and evaluate potential sources of information for accuracy, reliability, validity, and timeliness
  5. Distinguish between types of evidence (e.g., expert testimony, analogies, anecdotes, statistics) and use a variety of types to support a particular research purpose
  6. Use in-text parenthetical citations to document sources of quotations, paraphrases and information
  7. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (CCSS: W.9-10.9)
    • Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]"). (CCSS: W.9-10.9)
    • Apply grades 9-10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning"). (CCSS: W.9-10.9)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does media influence the questions you ask about an issue?
  2. What is "strong" evidence?
  3. When does framing a question incorrectly set off a series of flawed evaluations?
  4. How can a group of different-minded opinion leaders weaken a central idea or search for solution?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Multiple sources are used to conduct second level claim checks on "so called" quality research (such as the Internet or library focus groups and polling).
  2. Clicker or opinion technology can pinpoint public trust in information.
  3. Students can locate experts in the field of their research using online resources and use technology tools such as Skype, email, and wikis to communicate with them to ask questions and seek answers.

Nature Of:

  1. We overcome initial limitations of information to make sense and propose solutions or findings.
  2. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 9-10. (CCSS: WHST.9-10.7-9)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 4. Research and Reasoning

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. High-quality research requires information that is organized and presented with documentation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. (CCSS: W.5.7)
    • Summarize and support key ideas
    • Demonstrate comprehension of information with supporting logical and valid inferences
    • Develop and present a brief (oral or written) research report with clear focus and supporting detail for an intended audience
  2. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources. (CCSS: W.5.8)
    • Develop relevant supporting visual information (charts, maps, graphs, photo evidence, models)
    • Provide documentation of sources used in a grade-appropriate format

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do writers summarize and synthesize information to reflect their ideas on a subject?
  2. How do writers organize information so they can reflect on the data gathered?
  3. How do writers determine what they want the audience to know and how can they measure it?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Researchers organize information and present it to others around a point of view.
  2. Researchers self-evaluate presentations so they can improve.
  3. Presentation tools include laser light pointer, animated shows, videotape, and clickers.
  4. Treasure seekers use depth radar, metal detectors, and fish school finders to determine the gather information. These are examples of logical and valid sources of supporting information.
  5. Effective research with actual documenting sources often persuades a court or a clerk or peers.
  6. Use online tools to present information to a broad audience.

Nature Of:

  1. Researchers plan, present, and evaluate projects that have a specific point of view.

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 4. Research and Reasoning

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehending new information for research is a process undertaken with discipline both alone and within groups

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. (CCSS: W.4.7)
    • Identify a topic and formulate open-ended research questions for further inquiry and learning
    • Present a brief report of the research findings to an audience
  2. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. (CCSS: W.4.8)
    • Identify relevant sources for locating information
    • Locate information using text features, (appendices, indices, glossaries, and table of content)
    • Gather information using a variety of resources (reference materials, trade books, online resources, library databases, print and media resources)
    • Read for key ideas, take notes, and organize information read (using graphic organizer)
    • Interpret and communicate the information learned by developing a brief summary with supporting details
    • Develop relevant supporting visual information (charts, maps, diagrams, photo evidence, models)
  3. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (CCSS: W.4.9)
    • Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions]."). (CCSS: W.4.9.a)
    • Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text"). (CCSS: W.4.9.b)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What facts do writers use to support their ideas and opinions?
  2. Which text features did you find the most useful as you wrote your report?
  3. As researchers begin a research project, how do they organize their resources as they gather them?
  4. How would you rate your own contributions to your group and why?
  5. How does a group resolve conflicts as it works on a group project?
  6. What evidence can students use to ensure that all members of a group make a strong contribution?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Writers plan, write, and present information to an audience that reflects their point of view.
  2. Students use a rubric to self-evaluate their project.
  3. Good readers ask good questions.
  4. Researchers who use multiple resources create a stronger research project.
  5. Use electronic tools to summarize and organize your thinking
  6. Use social networking tools to create and share your information.

Nature Of:

  1. Researcher plan, present, and evaluate projects that define a point of view.
  2. Before researchers begin a research project, they always have materials ready to take notes and highlight key ideas so that they can refer to them later.
  3. Researcher can use the glossary or appendix.