New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Reading, Writing and Communicating - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eleventh Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Stylistic and thematic elements of literary or narrative texts can be refined to engage or entertain an audience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.11-12.3)
    • Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. (CCSS: W.11-12.3a)
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.11-12.3b)
    • Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution). (CCSS: W.11-12.3c)
    • Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.11-12.3d)
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. (CCSS: W.11-12.3e)
    • Use a range of strategies to evaluate whether the writing is presented in a clear and engaging manner (such as reading the text from the perspective of the intended audience, seeking feedback from a reviewer)
    • Evaluate and revise text to eliminate unnecessary details, ineffective stylistic devices, and vague or confusing language

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the implications if the revision process is not done?
  2. Why do writers want to appeal to the readers' senses?
  3. Why use sensory tools to influence the reader?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Many companies and colleges require a statement of intent when applying for a job or completing applications, respectively.
  2. Conveying a point of view in writing is an important skill to have when applying for a competitive job or to college.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers enjoy finding new ways to create tone or mood in writing.
  2. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: WHST.11-12.1-6 and 10)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Elements of informational and persuasive texts can be refined to inform or influence an audience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. (CCSS: W.11-12.1)
    • Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. (CCSS: W.11-12.1a)
    • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases. (CCSS: W.11-12.1b)
    • Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. (CCSS: W.11-12.1c)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. (CCSS: W.11-12.1d)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. (CCSS: W.11-12.1e)
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. (CCSS: W.11-12.2)
    • Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.11-12.2a)
    • Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic. (CCSS: W.11-12.2b)
    • Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. (CCSS: W.11-12.2c)
    • Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic. (CCSS: W.11-12.2d)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing. (CCSS: W.11-12.2e)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). (CCSS: W.11-12.2f)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is audience determination important to the writer?
  2. What are the implications if the revision process is not done?
  3. Why do authors want to appeal to the readers' senses?
  4. How is this beneficial to the reader?
  5. How does an author use sensory tools to influence readers as they read?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Forest rangers and cattlemen can sometimes refine information to differentiate their respective points of view.
  2. Blogs, advertising and public service announcements are examples of where persuasive texts attempt to influence audiences.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers can clearly articulate their thoughts to persuade or inform an audience.
  2. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 11-12. (CCSS: WHST.11-12.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Ideas and supporting details in informational and persuasive texts are organized for a variety of audiences and purposes and evaluated for quality

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (CCSS: W.8.1)
    • Develop texts that offer a comparison, show cause and effect, or support a point
    • Write and justify a personal interpretation of literary or informational text that includes a thesis, supporting details from the literature, and a conclusion
    • Select and use appropriate rhetorical techniques (such as asking questions, using humor, etc.) for a variety of purposes
    • Use specific details and references to text or relevant citations to support focus or judgment
    • Use planning strategies to select and narrow topic
    • Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. (CCSS: W.8.1a)
    • Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. (CCSS: W.8.1b)
    • Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. (CCSS: W.8.1c)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style. (CCSS: W.8.1d)
    • Explain and imitate emotional and logical appeals used by writers who are trying to persuade an audience
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. (CCSS: W.8.1e)
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (CCSS: W.8.2)
    • Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.8.2a)
    • Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. (CCSS: W.8.2b)
    • Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. (CCSS: W.8.2c)
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (CCSS: W.8.2d)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style. (CCSS: W.8.2e)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. (CCSS: W.8.2f)
    • Elaborate to give detail, add depth, and continue the flow of an idea

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When tools do readers use to summarize ideas as they read?
  2. Why do authors like to persuade readers?
  3. If you could persuade someone to do something that you wanted, what would that be? How might you go about persuading them in writing?
  4. What types of words do authors use when they are trying to convince or persuade others to do what they want?
  5. When can an author's influence or persuasion be dangerous? Helpful?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Convincing someone to vote for a candidate in an election usually requires comparisons, details and citations.
  2. Consumers Reports gathers, analyzes, and publishes product comparisons that evaluate for quality.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers know how important it is to connect prior knowledge with new information.
  2. Writers write for pleasure and to influence people.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: WHST.6-8.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Organization is used when composing informational and persuasive texts

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (CCSS: W.7.1)
    • Develop texts that explain a process; define a problem and offer a solution; or support an opinion
    • Generate support from a variety of primary or secondary sources, such as interviews, electronic resources, periodicals, and literary texts
    • Reach an authentic audience with a piece of informational or persuasive writing
    • Explain and imitate emotional appeals used by writers who are trying to persuade an audience
    • Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. (CCSS: W.7.1a)
    • Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. (CCSS: W.7.1b)
    • Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence. (CCSS: W.7.1c)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style. (CCSS: W.7.1d)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. (CCSS: W.7.1e)
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (CCSS: W.7.2)
    • Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.7.2a)
    • Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. (CCSS: W.7.2b)
    • Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. (CCSS: W.7.2c)
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (CCSS: W.7.2d)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style. (CCSS: W.7.2e)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. (CCSS: W.7.2f)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do different references enhance readers' thinking about writing?
  2. Why does word choice play such an important part in writing?
  3. How can a writer use his/her influence to persuade readers?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Hard-hitting and exciting television interviews always begin with well-thought out and organized questions.
  2. Electronic race tracks, video games, and search tools are written using adapted software systems.

Nature Of:

  1. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: WHST.6-8.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Writing literary genres for intended audiences and purposes requires ideas, organization, and voice

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. (CCSS: W.6.3)
    • Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. (CCSS: W.6.3a)
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. (CCSS: W.6.3b)
    • Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. (CCSS: W.6.3c)
    • Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. (CCSS: W.6.3d)
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. (CCSS: W.6.3e)
  2. Employ a range of planning strategies to generate descriptive and sensory details (webbing, free writing, graphic organizers)
  3. Use a range of poetic techniques (alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme); figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification); and graphic elements (capital letters, line length, word position) to express personal or narrative voice in texts
  4. Organize literary and narrative texts using conventional organizational patterns of the chosen genre
  5. Use literary elements of a text (well-developed characters, setting, dialogue, conflict) to present ideas in a text
  6. Use word choice, sentence structure, and sentence length to create voice and tone in writing

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What descriptors help the reader visualize the character, setting, and plot in a composition?
  2. What language brings a piece of writing to life for the reader?
  3. How can desktop and online resources be used to edit and critique a work in progress?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When working on an important project at work people can use a variety of online resources to expand their ideas.
  2. Pieces of electronic information can be stored for later use, application, and research.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers use the writing process, with a variety of media and technology tools to publish compositions.
  2. Writers use descriptive language to create mental pictures for the reader.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: WHST.6-8.1-6 and 10)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Writing informational and persuasive genres for intended audiences and purposes require ideas, organization, and voice develop

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (CCSS: W.6.1)
    • Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly. (CCSS: W.6.1a)
    • Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. (CCSS: W.6.1b)
    • Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons. (CCSS: W.6.1c)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style. (CCSS: W.6.1d)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented. (CCSS: W.6.1e)
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. (CCSS: W.6.2)
    • Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. (CCSS: W.6.2a)
    • Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. (CCSS: W.6.2b)
    • Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. (CCSS: W.6.2c)
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. (CCSS: W.6.2d)
    • Establish and maintain a formal style. (CCSS: W.6.2e)
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented. (CCSS: W.6.2f)
  3. Write multi-paragraph compositions that have clear topic development, logical organization, effective use of detail, and variety in sentence structure
  4. Organize information into a coherent essay or report with a thesis statement in the introduction and transition sentences to link paragraphs
  5. Write to pursue a personal interest, to explain, or to persuade
  6. Write to analyze informational texts (explains the steps in a scientific investigation)
  7. Analyze and improve clarity of paragraphs and transitions
  8. Select vocabulary and information to enhance the central idea
  9. Identify persuasive elements in a peer's writing and critique the effectiveness

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is relevance so important when someone is writing?
  2. How do writers monitor their work to include information that is relevant to the topic?
  3. How do writers improve the organization of a piece of writing?
  4. How is word selection important to a piece of writing?
  5. If strong, well-selected vocabulary is used, what might a reader say to the author?
  6. How does text organization help the reader understand writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Before a project is turned in to a supervisor, people work with a co-worker to edit and revise their work.
  2. Successful revision includes rereading, reflecting, rethinking, and rewriting.
  3. Choosing the right words to communicate thoughts helps deliver a clear message.
  4. Working together, a written piece can reflect valued points of view and motivate others.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers understand that compositions may be used to convey ideas, evoke emotion, persuade, or entertain.
  2. Creative and colorful writing persuades and influences events.
  3. Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Grades 6-8. (CCSS: WHST.6-8.1-6 and 10)

Content Area: Reading, Writing and Communicating
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 3. Writing and Composition

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Text types and purposes, labels, and familiar words are used to communicate information and ideas

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...). (CCSS: W.K.1)
  2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic. (CCSS: W.K.2)
  3. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened. (CCSS: W.K.3)
  4. With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed. (CCSS: W.K.5)
  5. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. (CCSS: W.K.6)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do people share ideas with print?
  2. What happened in this story? (If needed, prompt with a sentence stem.)
  3. Why did the author like writing this story? (He/she likes dogs.)
  4. What comes at the beginning of each sentence? What comes at the end?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Family photo albums are sequenced and labeled to tell a simple story.
  2. Drawing the scenes from an oral tale illustrates a person's interpretation of a story.

Nature Of:

  1. Writers can communicate their ideas in many forms.