New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Science - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

9. Evolution occurs as the heritable characteristics of populations change across generations and can lead populations to become better adapted to their environment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based scientific explanation for how Earth's diverse life forms today evolved from common ancestors (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and interpret multiple lines of evidence supporting the idea that all species are related by common ancestry such as molecular studies, comparative anatomy, biogeography, fossil record and embryology (DOK 2-3)
  3. Analyze and interpret data suggesting that over geologic time, discrete bursts of rapid genetic changes and gradual changes have resulted in speciation (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze and interpret data on how evolution can be driven by three key components of natural selection - heritability, genetic variation, and differential survival and reproduction (DOK 1-3)
  5. Generate a model - an evolutionary tree - showing how a group of organisms is most likely diverged from common ancestry (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do subtle differences among closely-related fossil species provide evidence of environmental change and speciation?
  2. How does studying extinct species contribute to our current understanding of evolution?
  3. How can patterns of characteristics shared among organisms be used to categorize life's diversity according to relatedness?
  4. How does modern agriculture affect biodiversity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Resistance can occur when antibiotics and pesticides are overused or abused.
  2. Human activities can generate selective pressures on organisms, such as breeding new kinds of dogs and improving livestock.

Nature Of:

  1. Understand that all scientific knowledge is subject to new findings and that reproducible, corroborated, and converging lines of data yield a scientific theory. (DOK 1)
  2. Differentiate among the use of the terms "hypothesis," "theory," and "law" as they are defined and used in science compared to the usage of these terms in other disciplines or everyday use. (DOK 1-2)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Individual organisms with certain traits are more likely than others to survive and have offspring in a specific environment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based explanation for why a given organism with specific traits will or will not survive to have offspring in a given environment (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and interpret data about specific adaptations to provide evidence and develop claims about differential survival and reproductive success (DOK 1-3)
  3. Use information and communication technology tools to gather information from credible sources, analyze findings, and draw conclusions to create and justify an evidence-based scientific explanation (DOK 1-2)
  4. Use computer simulations to model differential survival and reproductive success associated with specific traits in a given environment (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the relationship between an organism's traits and its potential for survival and reproduction?
  2. How is the use of the word "adaptation" different in everyday usage than in biology?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Bacteria have evolved to survive in the presence of the environmental pressure of antibiotics - giving rise to antibiotic resistance.
  2. Species that can live with humans -such as rats and pigeons - are more common around towns and cities.

Nature Of:

  1. Create and use sound experimental designs to collect data around survival and genetic traits. (DOK 2-3)
  2. Describe several ways in which scientists would study genetics, and suggest ways that this has contributed to our understanding of survival and populations. (DOK 1-2)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

5. Multiple lines of evidence show the evolution of organisms over geologic time

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Interpret and analyze data from the fossil record to support a claim that organisms and environments have evolved over time (DOK 1-2)
  2. Analyze and critique the evidence regarding the causes and effects of a mass extinction event (DOK 2-3)
  3. Analyze and interpret data that show human evolution (DOK 1-3)
  4. Use technology to share research findings about the evidence regarding the causes and effects of a mass extinction event (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What might life on Earth have been like in the distant past, and what evidence is there for this?
  2. How does the evidence about the way life has evolved on Earth from long ago tell us about Earth today?

Relevance & Application:

  1. There is growing concern over the current extinction of organisms around the world - and the consequences of these extinctions.

Nature Of:

  1. Share experimental data, and respectfully discuss conflicting results emulating the practice of scientists. (DOK 2-3)
  2. Cite various scientific arguments regarding the causes and effects of mass extinctions. (DOK 1)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comparing fossils to each other or to living organisms reveals features of prehistoric environments and provides information about organisms today

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use evidence to develop a scientific explanation for: 1. What fossils tell us about a prehistoric environment 2. What conclusions can be drawn from similarities between fossil evidence and living organisms (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and interpret data to generate evidence about the prehistoric environment (DOK 1-2)
  3. Evaluate whether reasoning and conclusions about given fossils are supported by evidence (DOK 1-3)
  4. Use computer simulations that model and recreate past environments for study and entertainment (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some things fossils can't tell us?
  2. What conditions would most likely lead to something becoming a fossil?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Computers are used to model and recreate past environments for study and entertainment.

Nature Of:

  1. Ask testable questions about past environments. (DOK 2)
  2. Make predictions about past environments based on fossil evidence. (DOK 2)
  3. Recognize that different interpretations of evidence are possible. (DOK 1)