New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Science - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 1. Physical Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Newton's laws of motion and gravitation describe the relationships among forces acting on and between objects, their masses, and changes in their motion - but have limitations

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Gather, analyze and interpret data and create graphs regarding position, velocity and acceleration of moving objects (DOK 1-3)
  2. Develop, communicate and justify an evidence-based analysis of the forces acting on an object and the resultant acceleration produced by a net force (DOK 1-3)
  3. Develop, communicate and justify an evidence-based scientific prediction regarding the effects of the action-reaction force pairs on the motion of two interacting objects (DOK 1-3)
  4. Examine the effect of changing masses and distance when applying Newton's law of universal gravitation to a system of two bodies (DOK 1-2)
  5. Identify the limitations of Newton's laws in extreme situations (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can forces be acting on an object without changing the object's motion?
  2. Why do equal but opposite action and reaction forces not cancel?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Newton's laws are used in a variety of design processes such as vehicle safety, aerospace, bridge design and interplanetary probes.
  2. An understanding of forces leads to safer building designs such as earthquake-safe buildings.
  3. Forces present in the earth lead to plate tectonics.

Nature Of:

  1. Use an inquiry approach to answer a testable question about an application of Newton's laws of motion. (DOK 1-4)
  2. Share experimental data, respectfully discuss conflicting results, and analyze ways to minimize error and uncertainty in measurement. (DOK 2-3)
  3. Differentiate between the use of the terms "law" and "theory" as they are defined and used in science compared to how they are used in other disciplines or common use. (DOK 1-2)
  4. Use technology to perform calculations and to organize, analyze and report data. (DOK 1-2)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. Physical Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify and calculate the direction and magnitude of forces that act on an object, and explain the results in the object's change of motion

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Predict and evaluate the movement of an object by examining the forces applied to it (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use mathematical expressions to describe the movement of an object (DOK 1-2)
  3. Develop and design a scientific investigation to collect and analyze speed and acceleration data to determine the net forces acting on a moving object (DOK 2-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What relationships exists among force, mass, speed, and acceleration?
  2. What evidence indicates a force has acted on a system? Is it possible for a force to act on a system without having an effect?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Engineers take forces into account when designing moving objects such as car tires, roller coasters, and rockets.
  2. Vehicles and their propulsion systems are designed by analyzing the forces that act on the vehicle. For example, the designs of propellers and jet engines are based on the aerodynamics of airplanes.

Nature Of:

  1. Recognize that our current understanding of forces has developed over centuries of studies by many scientists, and that we will continue to refine our understanding of forces through continued scientific investigations and advances in data collection. (DOK 1)
  2. Find, evaluate, and select appropriate information from reference books, journals, magazines, online references, and databases to answer scientific questions about motion and acceleration. (DOK 1-2)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 1. Physical Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Changes in speed or direction of motion are caused by forces such as pushes and pulls

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and predict how the direction or speed of an object may change due to an outside force (DOK 1-2)
  2. Analyze and interpret observable data about the impact of forces on the motion of objects (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What must be known about a force to predict how it will change an object's motion?
  2. How does applying a force affect the way an object moves?
  3. How do an object's properties affect how it will move when a force is applied?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology makes our lives easier by applying what we know about how forces can affect objects such as tires, bicycles, and snow throwers.
  2. In many recreational activities, such as tug-of-war, there is a relationship between forces and changes in motion.

Nature Of:

  1. Select appropriate tools for data collection. (DOK 1-2)
  2. Measure the change in speed or direction of an object using appropriate units. (DOK 1-2)
  3. Collaboratively design an experiment, identifying the constants and variables. (DOK 1-2)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Physical Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Objects can move in a variety of ways that can be described by speed and direction

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe, investigate, and describe how different objects move (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe the motion of a child who is playing (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What can change how fast or slow an object travels?
  2. What indicates which objects will be easier or harder to move?

Relevance & Application:

  1. People must push harder to move their bikes, skateboards, or scooters as they go faster or as they go up a hill.
  2. Information about motion can be represented in pictures, illustrations, and simple charts.

Nature Of:

  1. Recognize that scientists try to be clear and specific when they describe things. (DOK 1)
  2. Make predictions about the motion of an object. (DOK 1-2)
  3. Ask testable questions about the movement of objects. (DOK 1-3)