New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Science - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Matter tends to be cycled within an ecosystem, while energy is transformed and eventually exits an ecosystem

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze how energy flows through trophic levels (DOK 1-2)
  2. Evaluate the potential ecological impacts of a plant-based or meat-based diet (DOK 2)
  3. Analyze and interpret data from experiments on ecosystems where matter such as fertilizer has been added or withdrawn such as through drought (DOK 1-3)
  4. Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based scientific explanation showing how ecosystems follow the laws of conservation of matter and energy (DOK 1-3)
  5. Define and distinguish between matter and energy, and how they are cycled or lost through life processes (DOK 1-2)
  6. Describe how carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water cycles work (DOK 1)
  7. Use computer simulations to analyze how energy flows through trophic levels (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a change in abiotic factors influence the stability or progression of an ecosystem?
  2. What happens when the cycling of matter in ecosystems is disrupted?
  3. What energy transformations occur in ecosystems?
  4. How does the process of burning carbon-rich fossil fuels compare to the oxidation of carbon biomolecules in cells?

Relevance & Application:

  1. When the matter or energy flow in an ecosystem is disturbed, there are measurable effects such as the eutrophication of water.
  2. Matter and energy are cycled in natural systems such as wetlands in both similar and different ways than in human-managed systems such as waste water treatment plants.

Nature Of:

  1. Address differences between experiments where variables can be controlled and those where extensive observations on a highly variable natural system are necessary to determine what is happening - such as dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. (DOK 2)
  2. Share experimental data, and respectfully discuss conflicting results emulating the practice of scientists. (DOK 2-3)
  3. Design ecological experiments in a closed system. (DOK 2-4)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The size and persistence of populations depend on their interactions with each other and on the abiotic factors in an ecosystem

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze and interpret data about the impact of removing keystone species from an ecosystem or introducing non-native species into an ecosystem (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe or evaluate communities in terms of primary and secondary succession as they progress over time (DOK 1-2)
  3. Evaluate data and assumptions regarding different scenarios for future human population growth and their projected consequences (DOK 1-3)
  4. Examine, evaluate, question, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media to investigate ecosystem interactions (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do keystone species maintain balance in ecosystems?
  2. How does the introduction of a non-native species influence the balance of an ecosystem?
  3. How is the succession of local organisms altered in an area that is disturbed or destroyed?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Earth's carrying capacity is limited, and as the human population grows, we must find ways to increase the production of resources all people need to live.
  2. The extraction of resources by humans impacts nature ecosystems.

Nature Of:

  1. Critically evaluate scientific explanations in popular media to determine if the research methodology and evidence presented are appropriate and sufficient to support the claims. (DOK 2-3)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Human activities can deliberately or inadvertently alter ecosystems and their resiliency

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based scientific example of how humans can alter ecosystems (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and interpret data about human impact on local ecosystems (DOK 1-3)
  3. Recognize and infer bias in print and digital resources while researching an environmental issue (DOK 1-3)
  4. Use technology resources such as online encyclopedias, online databases, and credible websites to locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information about human impact on local ecosystems (DOK 1-2)
  5. Examine, evaluate, question, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media to investigate an environmental issue (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do humans have a unique responsibility to the ecosystems in which they live?
  2. How can a young person be a steward of an ecosystem?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Human activities such as cutting down forests and polluting water or covering deserts with fields of solar panels are constantly changing various cycles and habitats in the natural world.
  2. There are laws that preserve and protect wilderness areas such as national parks and other natural areas but such laws also limit the utilization of the natural resources in those areas.

Nature Of:

  1. Critically evaluate scientific claims in popular media and peer generated explanations regarding interactions in ecosystems, and determine if the evidence presented is appropriate and sufficient to support the claims. (DOK 2-3)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Changes in environmental conditions can affect the survival of individual organisms, populations, and entire species

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Interpret and analyze data about changes in environmental conditions - such as climate change - and populations that support a claim describing why a specific population might be increasing or decreasing (DOK 1-3)
  2. Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based explanation about how ecosystems interact with and impact the global environment (DOK 1-3)
  3. Model equilibrium in an ecosystem, including basic inputs and outputs, to predict how a change to that ecosystem such as climate change might impact the organisms, populations, and species within it such as the removal of a top predator or introduction of a new species (DOK 2-3)
  4. Examine, evaluate, question, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media to investigate how environmental conditions affect the survival of individual organisms (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do ecosystem changes affect biodiversity?
  2. How does biodiversity contribute to an ecosystem's equilibrium?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The development and application of technologies intended to aid some populations and ecosystems.

Nature Of:

  1. Ask testable questions and make a falsifiable hypothesis about how environmental conditions affect organisms, populations, or entire species and design a method to find the answer. (DOK 2-4)
  2. Recognize and describe the ethical traditions of science: value peer review; truthful reporting of methods and outcomes; making work public; and sharing a lens of professional skepticism when reviewing the work of others. (DOK 1)
  3. Use models and technology tools to show what might happen to individuals, populations, and species as environmental conditions change. (DOK 1-2)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Organisms interact with each other and their environment in various ways that create a flow of energy and cycling of matter in an ecosystem

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop, communicate, and justify an evidence-based explanation about why there generally are more producers than consumers in an ecosystem (DOK 1-3)
  2. Design a food web diagram to show the flow of energy through an ecosystem (DOK 1-2)
  3. Compare and contrast the flow of energy with the cycling of matter in ecosystems (DOK 2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do different ecosystems cycle matter differently?
  2. What "jobs" do organisms do to facilitate the flow of energy and cycling of matter?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Humans use an understanding of the cycling of matter and energy to help mitigate environmental problems. For example, they treat waste water and clean up oil spills.

Nature Of:

  1. Scientists work from the assumption that the universe is a single system in which the basic rules are the same everywhere - that energy follows the same rules in an ecosystem as it does in physic's experiments. (DOK 1)
  2. Generate solutions to help mitigate environmental problems based on an understanding of the cycling of matter and energy. (DOK 2-4)
  3. Create and evaluate models that show how interactions create a flow of energy and a cycling of matter in an ecosystem. (DOK 2-3)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. There is interaction and interdependence between and among living and nonliving components of ecosystems

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use evidence to develop a scientific explanation on how organisms adapt to their habitat (DOK 1-3)
  2. Identify the components that make a habitat type unique (DOK 1)
  3. Compare and contrast different habitat types (DOK 2)
  4. Create and evaluate models of the flow of nonliving components or resources through an ecosystem (DOK 2-3)
  5. Make a plan to positively impact a local ecosystem (DOK 2-4)
  6. Examine, evaluate, question, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media to investigate endangered habitats (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are resources shared among organisms in a specific ecosystem or habitat?
  2. How do nonliving components of an ecosystem influence living components?
  3. What would happen if the Sun's energy no longer reached Earth?
  4. What would happen if water were removed from an ecosystem?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Humans can have positive and negative impacts on an ecosystem.
  2. Nonliving components are cycled and recycled through ecosystems and need to be protected and conserved.

Nature Of:

  1. Understand that models are developed to explain and predict natural phenomena that cannot be directly observed because they happen over long periods of time. (DOK 1)
  2. Evaluate models that show interactions between living and nonliving components of ecosystems, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the model in representing what happens in the real world. (DOK 2-3)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Organisms depend on their habitat's nonliving parts to satisfy their needs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use evidence to develop a scientific explanation about how organisms depend on their habitat. (DOK 2-3)
  2. Analyze and interpret data about nonliving components of a habitat (DOK 1-2)
  3. Assess and provide feedback on other scientific explanations regarding why an organism can survive in its habitat (DOK 1-3)
  4. Use instruments to make observations about habitat components - for example, data can be collected from a fish tank to assess the environmental health (dissolved oxygen, pH, Nitrogen content). (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the basic needs of plants and animals?
  2. How are the basic needs of all living things similar and different?
  3. How do living things depend on their environment?
  4. How does an organism respond when basic needs are not met?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Living things depend on the health of their habitats.
  2. Different organisms have different needs.

Nature Of:

  1. Describe different ways that scientists seek to understand about organisms and their interactions with the environment. (DOK 1)
  2. Collaborate with other students in developing a scientific explanation about how organisms depend on their habitat. (DOK 1-2)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Living things have characteristics and basic needs

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use senses to gather information about living things (DOK 1-2)
  2. Observe and explore the natural processes of growing, changing, and adapting to the environment (DOK 1-2)
  3. Ask and pursue questions through simple investigations and observations of living things (DOK 2-3)
  4. Collect, describe, and record information about living things through discussion, drawings, and charts (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What do living things need to survive?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Mittens and hats keep people warm when the weather is cold.
  2. Gills on a fish allow them to "breathe" under water.

Nature Of:

  1. Be open to and curious about new tasks and challenges. (DOK 1-3)
  2. Explore and experiment. (DOK 1-3)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Living things develop in predictable patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the common needs such as food, air, and water of familiar living things (DOK 1)
  2. Predict, explain, and infer patterns based on observations and representations of living things, their needs, and life cycles (DOK 1-3)
  3. Make and record by drawing, acting out, or describing observations of living things and how they change over time (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do different living things change over time?
  2. What are some similarities and differences in how living things develop?
  3. How do the adults of various animals compare to younger versions of those same animals?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Butterflies have a predictable growth cycle.
  2. Leaves on a tree change color and fall every year.

Nature Of:

  1. Show a capacity for invention and imagination when looking for patterns of development. (DOK 1-3)