New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Science - Kindergarten

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Physical Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Objects can move in a variety of ways that can be described by speed and direction

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe, investigate, and describe how different objects move (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe the motion of a child who is playing (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What can change how fast or slow an object travels?
  2. What indicates which objects will be easier or harder to move?

Relevance & Application:

  1. People must push harder to move their bikes, skateboards, or scooters as they go faster or as they go up a hill.
  2. Information about motion can be represented in pictures, illustrations, and simple charts.

Nature Of:

  1. Recognize that scientists try to be clear and specific when they describe things. (DOK 1)
  2. Make predictions about the motion of an object. (DOK 1-2)
  3. Ask testable questions about the movement of objects. (DOK 1-3)

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Objects can be sorted by physical properties, which can be observed and measured

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe, investigate, and describe how objects can be sorted using their physical properties (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain why objects are sorted into categories (DOK 2)
  3. Sort a set of objects based on their physical characteristics, and then explain how the objects are sorted (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can objects belong to more than one group?
  2. How do you decide which properties are most important when putting objects into groups?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Materials have uses based on properties such as whether they are glass or plastic.
  2. Machines such as coin sorting machines can be designed to sort things efficiently.

Nature Of:

  1. Recognize that scientists try to be clear and specific when they describe things. (DOK 1)
  2. Share observations with others; be clear and precise like scientists. (DOK 1-2)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 2. Life Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Organisms can be described and sorted by their physical characteristics

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sort a group of items based on observable characteristics (DOK 1-2)
  2. Communicate and justify an evidence-based scientific rationale for sorting organisms into categories (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What do living things have in common?
  2. What characteristics are useful for sorting and classifying organisms?

Relevance & Application:

  1. There are patterns in the natural world.
  2. There are many ways to classify a group of organisms.

Nature Of:

  1. Ask questions about physical characteristics that will help them sort organisms. (DOK 2)
  2. Share scientific ideas verbally in a clear way. (DOK 1-2)
  3. Question peers about reasons for how they sort organisms, and encourage them to use evidence to support their ideas. (DOK 2)
  4. Use scientific tools such as magnifying glasses, sorting blocks, and rulers in investigations and play. (DOK 1)

Content Area: Science
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 3. Earth Systems Science

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. The Sun provides heat and light to Earth

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Investigate, explain, and describe that the Sun provides heat and light to Earth (DOK 1)
  2. Analyze and interpret temperature data between day (when the Sun shines on our area) and night (when the Sun does not shine on our area) (DOK 1-3)
  3. Investigate and communicate findings about what happens when the Sun's light is blocked (DOK 1-2)
  4. Investigate and communicate the effect of varying heat and light on the growth of plants through a scientific study (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does the Sun impact Earth?
  2. What happens when the Sun's light is blocked?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Decisions about activities to do on school grounds can be based on the light and heat from the sun (i.e. read under a tree to stay cool or avoid the slide when it is too hot from the sun, etc.)
  2. People make decisions about where to live based on temperature and how much sun that place gets.

Nature Of:

  1. Question peers and encourage clarity of reasoning about why they think the Sun provides heat and light to Earth. (DOK 2)