New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Social Studies - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect, complexity, unity and diversity over time

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. World history (both East and West including modern world history):
  2. Evaluate continuity and change over the course of world history (DOK 1-3)
  3. Investigate causes and effects of significant events in world history (DOK 1-2)
  4. Analyze the complexity of events in world history (DOK 2-3)
  5. Examine and evaluate issues of unity and diversity in world history (DOK 1-3)
  6. United States history (Reconstruction to the present):
  7. Analyze continuity and change in eras over the course of United States history (DOK 2-3)
  8. Investigate causes and effects of significant events in United States history. Topics to include but not limited to WWI, Great Depression, Cold War (DOK 1-2)
  9. Analyze the complexity of events in United States history. Topics to include but not limited to the suffrage movement and the Civil Rights Movement (DOK 2-3)
  10. Examine and evaluate issues of unity and diversity from Reconstruction to present. Topics to include but not limited to the rise and fall of Jim Crow, role of patriotism, and the role of religion (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What impact have individuals had on history?
  2. How has culture defined civilization?
  3. How does society decide what is important in history?
  4. What ideas have united people over time?
  5. How has diversity impacted the concepts of change over time?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The complex relationships among change, diversity and unity have long-lasting impacts on the cultural, political, and ideological components in society. For example, there is a need to understand cultural traditions and history in order to interact in the international world of business.
  2. The complex interrelationship between the past and the present is evident when solving issues over time. For example, human interaction with the environment has been a critical issue throughout history and continues to be a factor in pollution, climate change, and resource management.
  3. Businesses and individuals use history to understand the feasibility of new ideas and markets.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze the significance of interactions among eras, ideas, individuals, and groups
  2. Historical thinkers organize events into chronological eras and periods
  3. Historical thinkers study cause and effect, patterns, themes, and interdependence of events

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. The significance of ideas as powerful forces throughout history

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. World history (both East and West; to include but not be limited to modern world history):
  2. Discuss the historical development and impact of major world religions and philosophies. Topics to include but not limited to the Enlightenment and modern changes in Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism and Hinduism (DOK 1-3)
  3. Investigate the historical development of and impact of major scientific and technological innovations. Topics to include but not limited to the Industrial Revolution (DOK 1-4)
  4. Evaluate the historical development and impact of political thought, theory and actions (DOK 1-3)
  5. Analyze the origins of fundamental political debates and how conflict, compromise, and cooperation have shaped national unity and diversity. Topics to include but not limited to suffrage, Civil Rights and the role of government (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze ideas critical to the understanding of American history. Topics to include but not limited to populism, progressivism, isolationism, imperialism, anti-communism, environmentalism, liberalism, fundamentalism, and conservatism (DOK 1-3)
  7. Describe and analyze the historical development and impact of the arts and literature on the culture of the United States (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What if the belief "all men are created equal" did not exist?
  2. Which ideas provide the greatest insight to understanding a culture or nation's history?
  3. How has music, art, and literature reflected powerful ideas throughout history?
  4. How have philosophical and religious traditions affected the development of political institutions?
  5. How have scientific and technological developments affected societies?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The world is interconnected through the exchange of ideas as evident in science, technology, and economies. Examples include the printing press, trade routes, spread of information through the Internet, scientists working collaboratively but living in different countries, and instant reporting on the Internet.
  2. Philosophies, religions, and other powerful ideas have developed over time and across the world. Examples include the spread of religions around the globe, minority rights over time, exploration of space and the oceans, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)
  3. Literature, art (drama, music, dance) reflect and express powerful ideas over time, such as equal rights, civil disobedience, religious thought and expression, government issues)

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers study and analyze the impacts that arise from the interaction of political, philosophical, technological, artistic, and scientific thought.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes from the origins of the American Revolution through Reconstruction and their relationships with one another

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Determine and explain the historical context of key people and events from the origins of the American Revolution through Reconstruction including the examination of different perspectives (DOK 1-2)
  2. Evaluate continuity and change over the course of United States history by examining various eras and determining major sources of conflict and compromise (DOK 1-3)
  3. Examine factors that motivated the military and economic expansion from the American Revolution through Reconstruction (DOK 1-2)
  4. Evaluate the impact of different factors - on topics to include but not limited to gender, age, ethnicity and class- on groups and individuals in this time period and the impact of these groups and individuals on the events of the time period (DOK 1-3)
  5. Analyze causes and effects of major conflicts from the origins of the American Revolution through Reconstruction (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze ideas that are critical to the understanding of American history and give examples of the ideals involved in major events and movements. Topics to include but not limited to representative democracy, federalism, capitalism, abolition, temperance, nativism, and expansionism (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How have the basic values and principles of American democracy changed over time and in what ways have they been preserved?
  2. To what extent are the ideas of the American Revolution and the United States Constitution still affecting the world today?
  3. What would the United States be like if the British had won the American Revolution?
  4. To what extent was the Civil War an extension of the American Revolution?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The context and information from the past are used to make connections and inform decisions in the present. For example, the concepts of liberty continue to be defended by lawyers and citizens while the rights and responsibilities of citizens continue to evolve through the work of policy makers, legislators, judges, lawyers, and individuals.
  2. Technological developments continue to evolve and impact the present. For example, communication media has evolved from printing, telegraph, early photography and continues to continues to evolve, in transportation of scientific discoveries)

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers study places and events from multiple perspectives in a way that leads to interpretations based on available evidence.
  3. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize time.
  4. Historical thinkers examine sources for audience, purpose, point of view, historical context, and propaganda.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes within regions of the Eastern Hemisphere and their relationships with one another

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain how people interact and are interconnected over key periods or eras in history in the Eastern Hemisphere (DOK 1-2)
  2. Determine and explain the historical context of key people, events, and ideas over time and include the examination of different perspectives from people involved (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe the foundation and development of key historical topics. Topics to include but not limited to early civilizations, Greece, Rome, ancient China and ancient African civilizations, and the Medieval World incorporating the Crusades and Feudalism (DOK 1-2)
  4. Analyze the social, political, cultural, economic, and technological development within the topics listed in above in evidence outcome "c" (DOK 1-3)
  5. Describe the history, interactions, and contributions of various peoples and cultures that have lived in or migrated to the Eastern Hemisphere. Topics to include but not limited to world religions, the Silk Road, East/West contact and settlement patterns (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does the rise or collapse of a government affect surrounding societies over time?
  2. What ideas have fundamentally changed different cultures in the Eastern Hemisphere?
  3. What are the factors that influenced the development of civilizations and nations?
  4. To what extent are ideas from ancient Greece, Rome, China, and Africa important in today's world?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historical information and context are used to interpret, evaluate, and inform current decisions or policies. For example, architects use ancient designs to influence their designs and advertisers use historical references in their ads to create context and meaning.
  2. Historical philosophies and ideas continue to inform and affect the present. For example, democracy continues to evolve from its Greek origins and cultural traditions change and evolve with global interaction.
  3. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. For example, the speed of communication is almost instantaneous with blogs and the Internet.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers construct history using a variety of sources.
  3. Historical thinkers interpret history from various points of view.
  4. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize time.
  5. Historical thinkers examine data for point of view, historical context, and propaganda.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes in regions of the Western Hemisphere and their relationships with one another

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain how people, products, cultures, and ideas interacted and are interconnected over key eras in the Western Hemisphere (DOK 1-2)
  2. Determine and explain the historical context of key people, events, and ideas over time including the examination of different perspectives from people involved. Topics to include but not limited to Aztec, Maya, Inca, Inuit, early Native American cultures of North America, major explorers, colonizers of countries in the Western Hemisphere, and the Columbian Exchange (DOK 1-3)
  3. Identify examples of the social, political, cultural, and economic development in key areas of the Western Hemisphere (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why have civilizations succeeded and failed?
  2. To what extent does globalization depend on a society's resistance to and adaptation to change over time?
  3. What factors influenced the development of civilizations and nations?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historical information and context are used to interpret, evaluate, and inform decisions or policies regarding current issues such as the impact of the Columbian exchange on the world today.
  2. Philosophies and ideas from history continue to inform and affect the present such as the Aztec, Maya, and Inca influence.
  3. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. For example, the speed of communication is almost instantaneous with blogs and the Internet.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers study people places, ideas, and events to construct the story of history from multiple perspectives.
  3. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize time.
  4. Historical thinkers examine data for point of view, historical context, or propaganda.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas, and themes in North America from 1491 through the founding of the United States government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and explain cultural interactions between 1491 and the American Revolution. Topics to include but not limited to the Columbian Exchange, the interactions between Europeans and native Americans in the 17th and 18th centuries, and the developing relationship between Europeans and enslaved Africans (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and describe the significant individuals and groups of Native Americans and European colonists before the American Revolution (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the development of political, social and economic institutions in the British American colonies (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain important political, social, economic, and military developments leading to and during the American Revolution (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What if Thomas Paine had not written Common Sense?
  2. How did historical events and individuals contribute to diversity in the United States?
  3. How did important American documents shape American beliefs and values?
  4. To what extent did individuals and their ideas contribute to the foundation of the United States government?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The context and information from the past are used to make connections and inform decisions in the present. For example, the concepts of liberty continue to be defended by lawyers and citizens while on topics to include but not limited to the rights and responsibilities of citizens continue to evolve through the work of policy makers, legislators, judges, lawyers, and individuals.
  2. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present in areas such as communication, transportation, and science.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize and study cause-and-effect relationships across time.
  3. Historical thinkers study people, places, and events to tell the story of history from multiple perspectives.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes in Colorado history and their relationships to key events in the United States

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Analyze various eras in Colorado history and the relationship between these eras and eras in United States history, and the changes in Colorado over time (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe interactions among people and cultures that have lived in Colorado (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe the development of the political structure in Colorado history. Topics to include but not limited to an understanding of the Colorado Constitution and the relationship between state and national government (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe the impact of various technological developments. Topics to include but not limited to the state of Colorado, including changes in mining technology; changes in transportation; early 20th century industrial changes; and mid- to late 20th century nuclear and computer technological changes (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. In what ways have geographic, economic, cultural, and technological changes influenced Colorado today?
  2. Why did people of various cultures migrate to and settle in Colorado?
  3. To what extent have unity and diversity shaped Colorado?
  4. How have various individuals, groups, and ideas affected the development of Colorado?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The context and information from the past is used to make connections and inform current decisions. For example, Colorado has had a history of boom and bust cycles that should influence the decisions of city and state planners.
  2. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. For example, environmental issues have had an impact on Colorado from the Gold Rush to modern pollution.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes across time periods.
  2. Historical thinkers seek accounts of history from multiple perspectives and from multiple sources.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. People in the past influence the development and interaction of different communities or regions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Compare past and present situations and events (DOK 1-2)
  2. Chronologically sequence important events in a community or region (DOK 1)
  3. Give examples of people and events, and developments that brought important changes to a community or region (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe the history, interaction, and contribution of the various peoples and cultures that have lived in or migrated to a community or region (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How have different groups of people both lived together and interacted with each other in the past?
  2. What types of questions do people ask to learn about the past?
  3. How has the region changed and yet remained the same over time?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The context and information from the past is used to make connections and inform decisions in the present. For example, the development and traditions of various groups in a region affect the economic development, tourist industry and the cultural make-up of a community.
  2. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present and permit innovation in a region. For example, Hispanics influence the culture in Pueblo; the military affects the culture in the Pikes Peak region; and the ski industry and mining affect the mountains.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers ask questions to guide their research into the past.
  2. Historical thinkers analyze the interaction, patterns, and contributions of various cultures and groups in the past.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. People have influenced the history of neighborhoods and communities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Organize the historical events of neighborhoods and communities chronologically (DOK 1)
  2. Compare and contrast past and present situations, people, and events in neighborhoods, communities, and the nation (DOK 1-2)
  3. Give examples of people and events, and developments that brought important changes to the community (DOK 1-2)
  4. Compare how communities and neighborhoods are alike and different (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe the history, interaction, and contribution of the various peoples and cultures that have lived in or migrated to neighborhoods and communities (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can understanding the past impact decision-making today?
  2. How have events and ideas from the past shaped the identity of communities and neighborhoods today?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historical information and context are used to interpret, evaluate, and inform decisions or policies regarding current issues. For example, the history of a city determines how it might advertise for tourism purposes.
  2. Philosophies and ideas from history continue to inform and impact the present. For example, the independent Western philosophy affects how local government works.
  3. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. An example of this would be the way communication is now almost instantaneous and thus, speeds up the nature of events.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers investigate relationships between the past and present.
  2. Historical thinkers organize findings in chronological order as one way to examine and describe the past.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Family and cultural traditions in the United States in the past

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify similarities and differences between themselves and others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Discuss common and unique characteristics of different cultures using multiple sources of information (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify famous Americans from the past who have shown courageous leadership (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify and explain the meaning of American national symbols. Symbols to include but not limited to the American flag, bald eagle, Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, the Capitol, and the White House (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are national symbols and their relationship to traditions in the United States?
  2. What are family and cultural traditions and how have they changed over time?
  3. How have individuals made a difference in their community?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The understanding of family and cultural traditions informs decisions and creates knowledge that is used throughout life. For example, Uncle Sam is used by political cartoonists to represent the United States.
  2. Knowledge of cultural traditions of various groups helps to gain insight, have new experiences, and collaboratively interact with society. For example, bowing is a sign of respect that American businesspersons would use when working in Japan.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers understand the importance of comparing and contrasting in identifying patterns and trends.
  2. Historical thinkers use chronology to sequence events.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. History

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The first component in the concept of chronology is to place information in sequential order

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Order sequence information using words. Words to include but not limited to past, present future, days, weeks, months, years, first, next, last, before, and after (DOK 1)
  2. Explore differences and similarities in the lives of children and families of long ago and today (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain why knowing the order of events is important (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know the order of events?
  2. Why do individuals use calendars and clocks?
  3. What happened yesterday and today, and what might happen tomorrow?
  4. How have you grown and changed over time?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The recording of events in sequential order helps to create understanding and see relationships, understand cause and effect, and organize information. For example, scientists record information about experiments in sequential order so they can replicate them, and law enforcement re-creates timelines to find missing people.
  2. Groups of individuals use similar tools for the organization of sequential information in order to communicate in a clear manner. For example, timelines use standard information such as date, time, month, and year for ease of communication.

Nature Of:

  1. Historical thinkers use chronology to order information sequentially.