New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Social Studies - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. The interconnected nature of the world, its people and places

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain how the uneven distribution of resources in the world can lead to conflict, competition, or cooperation among nations, regions, and cultural groups (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain that the world's population is increasingly connected to and dependent upon other people for both human and natural resources (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain how migration of people and movement of goods and ideas can enrich cultures, but also create tensions (DOK 1-2)
  4. Analyze how cooperation and conflict influence the division and control of Earth (DOK 1-2)
  5. Analyze patterns of distribution and arrangements of settlements and the processes of the diffusion of human activities (DOK 1-3)
  6. Make predictions and draw conclusions about the global impact of cultural diffusion (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does increasing globalization influence the interaction of people on Earth?
  2. How do cooperation and conflict influence the division and control of the social, economic, and political spaces on Earth?
  3. What predictions can be made about human migration patterns?
  4. How do technologies result in social change, some of which is unanticipated such as social networking?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The world is geographically interconnected, affecting daily life in such ways as the spread of disease, global impact of modern technology, and the impact of cultural diffusion.
  2. Technology creates new life choices, new interconnections between l people, new opportunities, and new conflicts. For example the spread of knowledge and democratic ideals throughout the world changes lives.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers evaluate global systems such as culture, diffusion, interdependence, migration, population pyramids, regional alliances, development of competition and trade, and the impact of population changes on society.
  2. Spatial thinkers study the interconnection between physical processes and human activities that help shape the Earth's surface.
  3. Spatial thinkers analyze how people's lives and identities are rooted in time and place.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Use geographic tools to analyze patterns in human and physical systems

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Interpret maps and other geographic tools as a primary source to analyze a historic issue (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe the nature and spatial distribution of cultural patterns (DOK 1-2)
  3. Recognize the patterns and networks of economic interdependence (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain the establishment of human settlements in relationship to physical attributes and important regional connections (DOK 1-2)
  5. Calculate and analyze population trends (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How has human settlement influenced changes in physical systems and culture?
  2. How can geographic tools help explore patterns in human and physical systems?
  3. How have people and the environment interacted to produce changes over time?
  4. How is human activity limited by the environment?
  5. How has the environment influenced human activity?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The analysis and understanding of patterns found in human and physical systems helps to explain impacts on society such as the impact of migration patterns on regions.
  2. Technology is used to find, plot, and express the patterns found in human and physical systems that affect society such as population density and growth analyses, impact of deforestation, and human and environmental changes that affect world health.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers use geographic tools to discover and investigate geographic patterns.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Regions have different issues and perspectives

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Classify data to construct thematic maps and make inferences (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and interpret data using geographic tools and create maps (DOK 1-3)
  3. Construct maps using fundamental principles to identify key information and analyze regional issues and perspectives in the Eastern Hemisphere (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain how the physical environment of a place influences its economy, culture, and trade patterns (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do geographers use a variety of maps to represent the world?
  2. How can a location be in different regions at the same time?
  3. How do regional issues affect larger areas?
  4. Do regions with similar issues around the world have similar geographic characteristics?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals and businesses understand the characteristics of a region and its needs. For example, a snowmobile business should not be located in the South and restaurants reflect regional tastes in foods.
  2. Regional access to resources affects individual perceptions, what they value, and how they react. For example, water consumption may be based on availability.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers study cultural groups in order to explain how they view a region.
  2. Spatial thinkers evaluate the use of resources in a region to predict and propose future uses.
  3. Spatial thinkers study the various definitions of regions.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Human and physical systems vary and interact

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Classify and analyze the types of connections between places (DOK 2-3)
  2. Identify physical features and explain their effects on people in the Western Hemisphere (DOK 1-2)
  3. Give examples of how people have adapted to their physical environment (DOK 1)
  4. Analyze positive and negative interactions of human and physical systems in the Western Hemisphere (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are different ways to define the Western Hemisphere based on human and physical systems?
  2. How have people interacted with the environment over time in a positive or negative way?
  3. How has globalization affected people and places?
  4. In what ways are places on Earth interdependent?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The study of how human and physical systems vary and interact helps to make better choices, decisions, and predictions. For example, resource distribution or trade is based on geographic features and environmental changes over time effect a business.
  2. Businesses analyze data regarding physical and human systems to make informed choices regarding production, trade, and resource acquisition.
  3. Nations use geographic information about human and physical systems to make decisions such as establishing trade routes, locating cities, trade centers and capitals, and establishing outposts and security systems like forts and walls.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers examine places and regions and the connections among them.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Causes and consequences of movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify variables associated with discovery, exploration, and migration (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain migration, trade, and cultural patterns that result from interactions (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe and analyze how specific physical and political features influenced historical events, movements, and adaptation to the environment (DOK 1-3)
  4. Analyze how cooperation and conflict among people contribute to political, economic, and social divisions in the United States (DOK 2-3)
  5. Give examples of the influence of geography on the history of the United States (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What human and physical characteristics have motivated, prevented, or impeded migration and immigration over time?
  2. How can migration and immigration be represented geographically?
  3. How has the movement of people and their belongings affected the environment both positively and negatively?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals understand the consequences and causes of movement to make connections to current personal or international events such as hurricane victims moving from storms, refugees fleeing from war, and economic hardship causing relocation for better jobs.
  2. Technology has influenced movement to, colonization of, and the settlement of North America. For example, the West was promoted as the place for economic prosperity. Transportation systems have influenced movement.
  3. Migration of individuals has multiple effects on society including economic and environmental impacts.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers study patterns of human movement.
  2. Spatial thinkers analyze the push and pull components of movement.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Connections within and across human and physical systems are developed

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe how the physical environment provides opportunities for and places constraints on human activities (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain how physical environments influenced and limited immigration into the state (DOK 1-2)
  3. Analyze how people use geographic factors in creating settlements and have adapted to and modified the local physical environment (DOK 1-3)
  4. Describe how places in Colorado are connected by movement of goods and services and technology (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What physical characteristics led various cultural groups to select the places they did for settlement in Colorado?
  2. How did Colorado settlers alter their environment to facilitate communication and transportation?
  3. How does the physical environment affect human activity?
  4. How does human activity affect the environment?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals and businesses consider geographic factors in making settlement decisions. For example, Colorado Springs has a dry climate that is favorable for computer companies, and ski resorts developed in the Rocky Mountains.
  2. Individuals and businesses adapt to and modify the environment. For example, businesses and resorts have been created near hot springs throughout the state.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers evaluate how physical features affect the development of a sense of place.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The concept of regions is developed through an understanding of similarities and differences in places

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Observe and describe the physical characteristics and the cultural and human features of a region (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify the factors that make a region unique including cultural diversity, industry and agriculture, and land forms (DOK 1-2)
  3. Give examples of places that are similar and different from a local region (DOK 1-2)
  4. Characterize regions using different types of features such as physical, political, cultural, urban and rural (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Are regions in the world more similar or different?
  2. Why do people describe regions using human or physical characteristics?
  3. What are geographic characteristics of a region?
  4. How do cultures lead to similarities and differences between regions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals compare and contrast characteristics of regions when making decisions and choices such as where to send children to school, what part of town to live in, what type of climate suits personal needs, and what region of a country to visit.
  2. Individuals and businesses make economic, political, and personal decisions such as where to farm, where to locate industry, and where to plant a garden based on geographic characteristics of a region.
  3. Individuals and business understand how geography influences the development of rural, urban, and suburban areas.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers create and use spatial representations of Earth.
  2. Spatial thinkers evaluate geographic data and represent it visually.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. People in communities manage, modify and depend on their environment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify how communities manage and use nonrenewable and renewable resources (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify local boundaries in the community (DOK 1)
  3. Explain why people settle in certain areas (DOK 1-2)
  4. Identify examples of physical features that affect human activity (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe how the size and the character of a community change over time for geographic reasons (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do available resources and their uses create change in a community?
  2. Are renewable and nonrenewable resources managed well? How do you know?
  3. Why are physical features often used as boundaries?
  4. What are the various groups in a community and how are they alike and different?
  5. How do you choose if you should recycle, reduce, reuse, or throw something away?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Individuals and businesses understand that they must manage resources in the environment such as conserving water, safeguarding clean air, managing electricity needs, and reducing the amount of waste.
  2. Communities collaborate to modify, manage, and depend on the environment. For example, elected officials decide how to manage resources, and communities may limit hunting, water usage, or other activities.
  3. Geographic technology is used to gather, track, and communicate how resources might be managed or modified. For example, ski areas track snowfall rates, analyze data for avalanche danger and even create snow.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers compare information and data, and recognize that environmental factors influence change in communities.
  2. Spatial thinkers study the uneven distribution and management of resources.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. People in different groups and communities interact with each other and with the environment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify examples of boundaries that affect family and friends (DOK 1-2)
  2. Give examples of how people use and interrelate with Earth's resources (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify how community activities differ due to physical and cultural characteristics (DOK 1-2)
  4. Give examples of how schools and neighborhoods in different places are alike and different (DOK 1-2)
  5. Identify cultural and family traditions and their connections to other groups and the environment (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are places like communities similar to and different from where you live?
  2. How do people celebrate traditions?
  3. What celebration or tradition would you create?
  4. How do people use resources in the local community?
  5. How do individuals in the community use the environment?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Maps change over time.
  2. People from various cultures are both similar and different and these differences are reflected in clothing, language, culture influencing social interactions.
  3. Boundaries and the need for boundaries affect everyday life. For example, boundary lines determine who owns a piece of property.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers study resources, their availability, and use as a key to understanding human interactions with their environment and each other.
  2. Spatial thinkers study human and environmental interactions and consequences of those interactions.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 2. Geography

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. People belong to different groups and live in different places around the world that can be found on a map or globe

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Compare and contrast how people live in different settings around the world (DOK 1-2)
  2. Give examples of food, clothing, and shelter and how they change in different environments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Distinguish between a map and a globe as ways to show places people live (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would it be like to live in another city, state, or country?
  2. Why do people belong to different groups?
  3. What makes a place special to the people who live there?

Relevance & Application:

  1. People live in different settings and interact with their environment based on location. For example, people living in colder climates wear more clothes, and people in areas where there are floods live on higher ground or in houses on stilts.
  2. People belong to different groups throughout their lives including sports teams, hobby clubs, political, or religious groups.

Nature Of:

  1. Spatial thinkers investigate other cultures and how they have been influenced by the climate, physical geography, and cultures of an area.