New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Social Studies - All - by Specific Prepared Graduate Competency - (Remove PGC Filter)

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: High School
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Purposes of and limitations on the foundations, structures and functions of government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe the origins, purposes and limitations of government and include the contribution of key philosophers and documents (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify the structure, function, and roles of members of government and their relationship to democratic values (DOK 1-2)
  3. Analyze and explain the importance of the principles of democracy and the inherent competition among values. Values to include but not be limited to freedom and security, individual rights and common good, and rights and responsibilities (DOK 2-3)
  4. Analyze the role of the founding documents and the evolution of their interpretation through governmental action and court cases. Documents to include but not limited to the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights (DOK 2-3)
  5. Use media literacy skills to locate multiple valid sources of information regarding the foundations, structures, and functions of government (DOK 1-3)
  6. Analyze how court decisions, legislative debates, and various and diverse groups have helped to preserve, develop, and interpret the rights and ideals of the American system of government (DOK 2-3)
  7. Evaluate the effectiveness of our justice system in protecting life, liberty, and property (DOK 3-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the most important democratic ideals and practices?
  2. What would society look like if several landmark court cases had been decided differently?
  3. How does government best protect individual rights and the rights of minorities, yet have the majority rule?
  4. What would United States government look like with no checks and balances or another mix of those limitations?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Skills and strategies are used to participate in public life and exercise rights, roles, and responsibilities. For example, eligible individuals vote, individuals pay taxes to support government services, and citizens act as advocates for ideas.
  2. Political issues are covered by the media, and individuals evaluate multiple media accounts using technology.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members understand the concept of "rule of law" and its role in policies and practices of the government.
  2. Responsible community members know the political theories that contributed to the foundation and development of the structures of government and their meaning today.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analyze how public policy - domestic and foreign - is developed at the local, state, and national levels and compare how policy-making occurs in other forms of government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Discuss multiple perspectives on local issues and options for participating in civic life (DOK 1-3)
  2. Analyze and discuss multiple perspectives on state issues and option for participating in civic affairs by shaping policies (DOK 2-3)
  3. Explain how to monitor and influence public policy (DOK 1-2)
  4. Analyze goals and tools used by the United States in developing foreign policy (DOK 1-3)
  5. Illustrate how various governments and leaders interact and evaluate how interactions among nations affect domestic and world events (DOK 1-3)
  6. Compare and contrast how different systems of government function (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do countries view global issues from different perspectives?
  2. How does domestic policy affect foreign policy?
  3. How does a government make foreign policy and can individuals influence policy?
  4. What are possible motivations underlying foreign policy decisions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The making of foreign and domestic policies impacts daily lives. For example, unrest in the Middle East could cause gasoline prices to rise and unrest in another nation affects extended families in the United States.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members gather and analyze data from multiple sources to look for patterns and create hypotheses regarding foreign policy.
  2. Responsible community members investigate foreign policy issues prior to making decisions.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The place of law in a constitutional system

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Discern various types of law (DOK 1-2)
  2. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of rule of law (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe and engage in various means of conflict management (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain the role and importance of the Constitution (DOK 1-2)
  5. Discuss the tensions between individual rights, state law, and national law (DOK 1-3)
  6. Explain how state and federal court power of judicial review is reflected in the United States form of constitutional government (DOK 1-2)
  7. Use a variety of resources to identify and evaluate issues that involve civic responsibility, individual rights, and the common good

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the "common good?"
  2. What are key court cases and historical events in the development of the United States?
  3. What are examples of successful and unsuccessful conflict resolution in United States history and why?
  4. How has the United States balanced individual rights and law?
  5. Which is more effective, the rule of law or the rule of man? Why?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Laws interact and may remain the same or change over time. For example, in a society with laws, leadership can change but the law remains the same.
  2. Laws allow understanding of the proper course of action and consequences for not adhering to the law. For example, safety belts are required in automobiles for safety reasons and various government agencies regulate industries to protect the common good.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members exercise their rights and responsibilities to effect change.
  2. Responsible community members understand rule of law and judicial review as components of the judicial system.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Compare how various nations define the rights, responsibilities, and roles of citizens

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Compare the definition of citizen in various governments (DOK 1-2)
  2. List the responsibilities of citizens in various governments (DOK 1)
  3. Define the roles of citizens in various governments (DOK 1)
  4. Give national and international examples of ethics and quality in government policies and practices (DOK 1-2)
  5. Give examples illustrating how various governments and citizens interact and analyze how these interactions have changed over time (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are fundamental human rights? (DOK 1-3)
  2. How can the definition of citizen change?
  3. What is the purpose of government?
  4. What roles of citizens are the most important?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The comparison of how different nations define the rights, responsibilities and roles of their citizens helps to understand the actions and reactions of various nations and their citizens to current events. For example, groups in France and Italy freely demonstrate while demonstrations in China are less frequent.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members exercise their rights, responsibilities, and roles.
  2. Responsible community members understand that rights, responsibilities, and roles of citizens are different over time and in various nations.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Compare multiple systems of government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe different forms of government (DOK 1)
  2. Identify how different forms of government relate to their citizens. Topics to include but limited to democracy and authoritarian government (DOK 1-2)
  3. Compare the economic components of different forms of government (DOK 1-2)
  4. Compare various governments' and the liberties of their citizens (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you define good government?
  2. What evidence can you find of effective and ineffective governments in the past and the present?
  3. What would a government look like if you created it?
  4. What are the consequences if a government does not provide for the common good?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to understand the different forms of government affects daily life. For example, employees work in international corporations and tourists visit countries with different laws, rules, and regulations.
  2. Knowledge of government is essential for understanding the implications of events around the world.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members discuss personal and national actions and their global consequences.
  2. Responsible community members identify ways in which lives are enriched and challenged because of the interconnected nature of a global society.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The origins, structure, and functions of the United States government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify political principles of American democracy and how the Constitution and Bill of Rights reflect and preserve these principles (DOK 1-2)
  2. Explain the historical foundation and the events that led to the formation of the United States constitutional government. Topics to include but not limited to the colonial experience, the Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of Confederation (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the origins, structure, and functions of the three branches of the United States government and the relationships among them (DOK 1-2)
  4. Describe how the decisions of the national government affect local and state government (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are democratic ideals and practices and their historic origins?
  2. Were the founding fathers correct in keeping the Constitution open for flexibility and interpretation? Why?
  3. How have historical documents defined and distributed power?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The origins, structure, and function of the United States government are studied to create an informed, civically literate, and responsible society. For example, fundamental principles and liberties are still evolving as judges interpret the Constitution, and legislators make laws and local city councils and boards create regulations

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members understand the concept of individual rights as a cornerstone to American democracy.
  2. Responsible community members understand the relationships between individual rights and personal responsibility.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The origins, structure, and functions of the Colorado government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the origins, structure, and functions of the three branches of the state government and the relationships among them (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and explain a variety of roles leaders, citizens, and others play in state government (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify and explain the services state government provides and how those services are funded (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain the historical foundation and the events that led to the formation of the Colorado government (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe how the decisions of the state government affect local government and interact with federal law (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is Colorado's Constitution important to individuals?
  2. What would state government look like if one of the branches had more power than the others?
  3. What would Colorado be like without a state government?
  4. To what extent were various individuals and organizations in the state important in the development of Colorado's government?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Knowledge of the origins, structure, and functions of Colorado's government provides for participation, influence and benefits. For example, individuals can vote on ballot issues that affect taxes.
  2. Technology helps to investigate resources and ask for government support and services. For example, someone wanting to open a restaurant can visit the Department of Health website to get information.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members understand the structure, function, and origin of the state government.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. The origins, structure, and functions of local government

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify the origins, structure, and functions of local government (DOK 1)
  2. Identify and explain the services local governments provide and how those services are funded (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify and explain a variety of roles leaders, citizens, and others play in local government (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are local governments and citizens interdependent?
  2. How do individuals get involved in their local government?
  3. How do local governments and citizens help each other?
  4. Why do people create governments?
  5. How do people, places, and events help us understand the ideals of democratic government?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Knowledge of the origins, structure, and functions of local government enables participation in the democratic process. For example, groups and governments work together to create a safe environment in the community.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members are involved in their local government.
  2. Responsible community members know how personal advocacy and involvement can lead to change in communities.
  3. Responsible community members use negotiation as an inherent part of decision-making.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. People use multiple ways to resolve conflicts or differences

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Give examples of ways that individuals, groups, and communities manage conflict and promote equality, justice, and responsibility (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify examples of power and authority and strategies that could be used to address an imbalance, including bullying as power without authority (DOK 1-3)
  3. Identify and give examples of appropriate and inappropriate uses of power and the consequences (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate skills to resolve conflicts or differences (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What happens when someone uses power unwisely?
  2. What are good ways to solve differences?
  3. What would it be like if everyone was friends?
  4. What do equality, justice, and responsibility look like in the world?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Conflict can arise for many reasons, including lack of information, or value or personality differences, and conflict may be resolved through compromise, competition, collaboration or avoidance. For example, parents may compromise about where to live.
  2. Various forms of conflict resolution are used to solve conflicts and differences. For example, city councils may call for a public hearing to learn what the community thinks about a new jail or library.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members know democratic and undemocratic principles and practices and how they are used in diverse communities.
  2. Responsible community members examine how culture influences the disposition of rules, laws, rights, and responsibilities.
  3. Responsible community members understand that power and authority shape individual participation.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notable people, places, holidays and patriotic symbols

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Give examples of notable leaders of different communities leaders to include but not limited to the president, mayor, governor, and law enforcement (DOK 1)
  2. Give examples of various patriotic symbols to include but not limited to the flag, bald eagle, Uncle Sam, and the national anthem (DOK 1)
  3. Identify significant places. Places to include but not limited to the Statue of Liberty, Capitol, White House, and important community sites (DOK 1)
  4. Identify significant civic holidays (DOK 1)
  5. Identify the American flag and the Colorado flag (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do we have national, community, and local celebrations and holidays?
  2. Who are important people in the development of our country?
  3. How are new national symbols, songs, or holidays created?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Symbols, songs, holidays, traditions, places, and people help to provide identity for the community and nation. For example, the Pledge of Allegiance is said on various occasions, individuals may salute the flag of their country, and patriotic songs are sung at sporting events and July 4th parades celebrate our nation's independence.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members understand the responsibilities of being a member of a community.
  2. Responsible community members see communities as multi-dimensional entities.
  3. Responsible community members investigate responsibility as a central part of group membership.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Participate in making decisions using democratic traditions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain why rules are needed (DOK 1-2)
  2. Create and follow classroom rules (DOK 1-3)
  3. Explain how a class rule promotes fairness and resolves conflict (DOK 1-2)
  4. Contribute to making and maintaining class community decisions (DOK 1-3)
  5. Give examples of the difference between democratic voting and decisions made by authorities including but not limited to the parent, teacher, or principal (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What would it look like to have no rules?
  2. How can we solve conflict in a fair manner?
  3. Why do we consider voting fair?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Rules help to ensure a safe society. For example, everyone wears seat belts in the car and games have rules to create fairness.
  2. Decisions are made cooperatively. For example, families vote on which movie to see and classes vote to see what project they will do.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members take an active role in their communities.
  2. Responsible community members know the importance of participation in democratic societies.
  3. Responsible community members know the importance of fairness and conflict resolution.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Civic participation takes place in multiple groups

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Categorize examples of people and events that relate to civic participation (DOK 1-2)
  2. Give examples of qualities of a good citizen (DOK 1)
  3. Practice citizenship skills including courtesy, honesty, and fairness in working with others (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What qualities make people good citizens?
  2. Why would people want to have friends from different groups?
  3. What can you do to be an active and helpful member of your class and school?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability for civic participation differs with age and place. For example, children can volunteer and adults can run for elected office.
  2. Individual actions can make the community better. For example, people clean up the highways or volunteer in shelters.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members exist across the globe and participation is influenced by cultural norms.
  2. Responsible community members study citizen participation and structures that bring security and stability to community life.

Content Area: Social Studies
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 4. Civics

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations) - (Remove PGC Filter)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Rules and their purpose in allowing groups to work effectively

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain that groups have rules (DOK 1-2)
  2. Recognize interpersonal boundaries (DOK 1-3)
  3. Exert self-control (DOK 1-2)
  4. Interact positively with others (DOK 1-2)
  5. Give examples of some rules that are permanent and some that change (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What happens when people do not work cooperatively?
  2. What personal boundaries are common?
  3. What happens if there are no rules?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Actions affect us and others. For example, fighting may result in injury and punishment.
  2. Rules are different in different settings. For example, school rules may be different from home rules.
  3. Situations may be fairer because of rules such as taking turns on playground equipment.

Nature Of:

  1. Responsible community members identify the effects of rules on individuals and groups.
  2. Responsible community members investigate the causes of inequities that exist within and among groups.
  3. Responsible community members study the tension between preserving security, and order and liberty.