New Colorado P-12 Academic Standards

Current Display Filter: Music - All

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Performance Pathway
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform music accurately and expressively demonstrating self-evaluation and personal interpretation at the minimal level of 3 on the difficulty rating scale

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Incorporate all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications, while maintaining consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, diction (vocal), and phrasing (DOK 1-3)
  2. Demonstrate advanced techniques (DOK 1-2)
  3. Interpret nontraditional notation symbols (DOK 1-2)
  4. Select appropriate literature for performance (for solo or small ensemble) (DOK 1-3)
  5. Describe and defend interpretive judgments (DOK 1-4)
  6. Explain how self-evaluation has strengthened the performance during the course of preparation (DOK 3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Does musical expression have a language?
  2. Why is it important to perform in all genres of music?
  3. How would an event in history impact use of expressive musical elements of the time?
  4. Why do Asian, African, Native American, Middle Eastern, calypso, and American folk songs have different expressive qualities?
  5. Why do performers need to evaluate themselves?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Synthesizing several expressive musical elements into one performance gives listeners a rich, memorable, and unique experience.
  2. Using music software, musicians can isolate, emphasize, and blend expressive elements in varying ways to change the message of the music to be interpreted in accordance with the musical expressions of varying cultures.
  3. Using musical elements helps to interpret the message of the composer.
  4. A musician conveys music using emotions and senses as a storyteller conveys a story.
  5. Current technologies can be used to support and assist with performance, practice, and evaluation (such as recording performances for evaluating expression and technique).

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians believe the craft of music is enhanced through accuracy and expression, which aid in the emotional and intellectual link between the performer and the listener.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform accurately and expressively at the first reading at the minimal level of 2 on the difficulty rating scale

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sight-read, observing all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications, while maintaining consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, and phrasing (vocalists, pitches only) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Interpret nontraditional notation symbols (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is sight reading important?
  2. How does strong intonation, balance, blend, and phrasing enhance sight reading?
  3. Why do nontraditional notation symbols exist?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Sight reading enables musicians to access varying types of music without having to hear it first.
  2. Sight reading allows musicians from all backgrounds to play together in impromptu acts of expression.
  3. Music software enables a novice musician to sight-read more difficult arrangements of music through playing notes aloud for ear training.
  4. When musicians read music from sight, they are using patterns just as mathematicians; scientists, and historians locate patterns to solve problems.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians with the ability to sight-read are given diverse performing opportunities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Participate appropriately as an ensemble member while performing music at the minimal level of 3 on the difficulty rating scale

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Adjust tempo, dynamics, and expression, according to the conductor (DOK 1-3)
  2. Adjust tempo, dynamics, and expression according to other members of the ensemble (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important for musicians to adjust their individual performance to aid in the success of an ensemble performance?
  2. How does an ensemble communicate?
  3. Does it require more or less musicianship to perform in an ensemble?
  4. How does culture play a role in the type of ensembles that are prevalent in society?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Engagement in collaboration through ensembles enhances perception and requires persistence in self-monitoring and decision making to work for the benefit of a common, societal goal.
  2. Use of ensembles varies depending on the era and culture.
  3. Software companies have begun to develop programs that adjust musical elements in real time as the performer adjusts in live performance.
  4. Performers access a variety of instrumentations electronically versus hiring and practicing with many instrumentalists.

Nature Of:

  1. Ensembles foster collaboration as well as interdependent thought.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Demonstrate requisite performance skill sets appropriate for postsecondary pursuits

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify all major and relative minor scales and arpeggios (DOK 1)
  2. Identify augmented or diminished triads, starting on any given pitch (DOK 1)
  3. Produce a characteristic tone (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate ability to identify music in other languages (vocal) (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument have its own timbre?
  2. How does music communicate?
  3. How does a general knowledge of tone and form apply to postsecondary pursuits?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Everyone can perform and respond to music in meaningful ways such as speeches, electronic presentations, and live presentations.
  2. Mastery of music performance skills can lead to success in other academic disciplines, social activities, mass media pursuits, and several other career pursuits.
  3. The persistent study of music develops discipline and resiliency that extends into everyday life.
  4. People can use electronic instruments as well as electronic and/or digital audio and video devices to create performances that entertain and communicate with an audience (such as using electronic keyboards or synthesizers, playing or singing with digital audio software to record performance).

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and performing music are forms of self-expression.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Generalist Pathway
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Present music expressively using appropriate technology

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Present a musical project based on the use of original or borrowed musical material, or environmental sounds from one or more sources, using one or more of the techniques of sequencing, mixing, overdubbing, and layering (DOK 1-4)
  2. Articulate further learning opportunities for the above skills (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does pirating music effect composers' lives?
  2. Why would one perform music from cultures other than their own?
  3. What is the importance of performing music from different historical periods, cultures, and traditions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding multiple career pathways through music allows for one to apply their creative skills to many future vocations in the 21st century workforce.
  2. The use of appropriate technology provides opportunities for meaningful musical experiences and expression by individuals who may not be skilled performers in a more traditional manner.
  3. Using available technology methods such as music software, computer assisted learning, and/or long distance allow ones' learning to go beyond basic classroom mastery of skills to explore and expand one's expression of musicality and potential career opportunities.

Nature Of:

  1. Engaging in the study of music develops one's ability to think and work interdependently.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Demonstrate informed participation in music-making activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Actively participate in music making by singing or playing instruments through the medium of a "garage band," cultural or religious musical group, family get-together, community ensemble, classroom inter-disciplinary group project, individual music-making effort, music-technology-based project or similar effort (DOK 1-3)
  2. Articulate the benefits of participation in music-related activities (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When looking at the community, how, when, and why is music used?
  2. How does society benefit from individuals participating in musical activities?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Knowing how music affects human emotion, people can program appropriate musical genres for appropriate settings.
  2. Understanding how composers earn money for their compositions leads to respect for copyright laws.
  3. Exploring copyright alternatives for granting or receiving limited rights to share and/or adapt works gives solutions to copyright concerns.
  4. Describing how various art forms and cultural resources preserve cultural heritage and influence contemporary art illustrates the interdisciplinary connections between music and other art forms.
  5. Promoting technology-based projects can incorporate diversity of interests and musical abilities, and connect with the community at large.

Nature Of:

  1. Self-expression is embodied in personal musical choices and musical endeavors.
  2. Participating in musical activities develops the ability to gather input through all the senses.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform music in four or more parts accurately and expressively at the minimal level of 2 to 3 on the difficulty rating scale

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sing or play in three, four, or more parts (level 2) (DOK 1-3)
  2. Respond to conductor's cues of balance and blend while singing or playing (DOK 1-3)
  3. Incorporate all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications while maintaining consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, diction (vocal), and phrasing (DOK 1-3)
  4. Demonstrate the ability to adjust elements of music (pitch, rhythm, dynamics, timbre, texture, form) during ensemble performances (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to hear balance between other parts in an ensemble?
  2. Could ensembles perform without conductors?
  3. How does voicing of music change the characteristic of the musical performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The expressive terminology in music gives relation to expressive terminology in visual art, theatre, dance, and oratory.
  2. Mass media uses varying performances to deliver specific moods to impact consumer choices.
  3. Music performances frequently convey messages and stories about important historical events.
  4. Expression is needed to perform effectively in various societal musical endeavors such as festivals, competitions, and performances.

Nature Of:

  1. Ensembles reflect a musical community.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform music accurately and expressively at the minimal level of 1 to 2 on the difficulty rating scale at the first reading

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sight-read, observing all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications (DOK 1-2)
  2. Maintain a consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, and phrasing (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is the ability to sight-read important?
  2. How does sight reading at a performance level impact career and higher level performing opportunities?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Observing musical symbols correlates to comprehending literary symbols such as punctuation.
  2. Mass media uses varying tone qualities to set a specific mood for their message.
  3. Sight reading and appropriate application of the music elements in performance provide opportunities for ensemble leadership.
  4. Music software allows direct assessment of reading and accuracy ability.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians use performance fluency as an indicator of musical leadership.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate contrasting modalities through performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Play or sing four major and three minor scales at least one octave in keys relative to their instrument/voice and understand relationships between major and minor (DOK 1-2)
  2. Perform music literature that contains contrasting modes (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to correlate modalities with different cultures?
  2. How do modalities shape musical expression?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Comparing and contrasting modal characteristics of historical, American, and cultural music examples lead to an understanding of similarities and differences among cultures.
  2. Identifying major/minor modalities improves components of listening skills.
  3. Developing fluency in scale performance broadens one's ability to expand instrumental and vocal range, opening more opportunities for musical expression.
  4. Music software can be used to change the modalities of a composition to compare and contrast the differences.

Nature Of:

  1. Modalities are used to demonstrate musical diversity.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform music in three or more parts accurately and expressively at the minimal level of 1 to 2 on the difficulty rating scale

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sing or play in three or more parts (level 1) (DOK 1-3)
  2. Respond to conductor's cues of tempo, phrasing, and expression (DOK 1-3)
  3. Sing or play a vocal or instrumental line with accompaniment and one additional harmonic or melodic line (DOK 1-3)
  4. Incorporate all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications while maintaining consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, diction (vocal), and phrasing (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes the conductor's cues important?
  2. Why is teamwork important when performing harmonic performance?
  3. How can an accompanist enhance a musical performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Performing in a variety of ensembles develops an ability to communicate.
  2. Many expressive music elements parallel reading conventions (such as diction, articulation, rhythm, and intonation).
  3. Expressive qualities of music capture unique cultural characteristics and provide awareness geography and culture.
  4. Multipart expression is needed to effectively perform in various musical endeavors such as festivals, competitions, and performances.
  5. Current technologies can be used to support, enhance, and evaluate musical practice and performance.

Nature Of:

  1. Individual and ensemble practice leads to accuracy and precision of musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform music accurately and expressively at the minimal difficulty level of 1 on the difficulty rating scale at the first reading individually and as an ensemble member

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sight-read, observing all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications (DOK 1-2)
  2. Maintain consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, and phrasing while sight reading (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know and read the expressive elements of music?
  2. How does accurate and expressive sight reading impact performance?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The use of sight-reading skills creates a literate and independent musician.
  2. The voice of language correlates with the voice of music (phrasing, balance, meter).
  3. Music software and audio or video devices can be used to assist in the practice of learning how to sight-read.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians use performance fluency as an indicator of musical leadership.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate understanding of modalities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Play or sing at least three major and two minor scales in keys appropriate for their instrument or voice (DOK 1-2)
  2. Perform music literature that contain major and minor keys (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does performance in minor modalities differ from major modalities?
  2. How will the demonstration of a minor scale performance lead to advancement?
  3. Why does changing the mode change the emotional expression?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Scales in minor modes have a different mathematical pattern.
  2. Culturally significant music is most easily recognized through the most prominent modality used (Eastern versus Western music).
  3. Playing and singing in minor modalities increase effectiveness to communicate diverse musical messages.
  4. Music technology can be used to transpose music to different modalities.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians rely on flexible thinking to enhance their craft.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform music in unison and two parts accurately and expressively at the minimal level of 1 on the difficulty rating scale

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sing or play in unison and two parts (level 1) with correct body/instrument position (DOK 1-3)
  2. Respond to conductor's cues of tempo; dynamics; and 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 time (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to play or sing with expression?
  2. Why is it important to observe the conductor, sing/play, and listen at the same time?
  3. How would music be different if there were no changes in expression?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Performing in a variety of ensembles allows development of collaboration skills to accomplish a mutual goal.
  2. Singing or playing with expressive elements is like adding voice to a literary work.
  3. Singing or playing in unison emphasizes key components in the musical message like exclamation points, commas, and other literary components do for text.
  4. Using music and its importance in expression of stories, cultural characteristics, and significant life milestones emphasize the commonalities and celebrate the differences between people.
  5. Current technologies provide many options for experiencing, practicing, and performing in two-part harmony. (Electronic keyboards play with partner, use rhythm feature to play in meters, use audio or video devices to record practices and use self-evaluation.)

Nature Of:

  1. Ensembles reflect a musical community.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform music accurately and expressively at the minimal level of 0.5 on the difficulty rating scale at the first reading

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sight-read, observing all musical symbols, tempo indications, expressive indications, and technical indications (DOK 1-2)
  2. Maintain consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, and phrasing when sight reading (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does sight-reading aid in expressive performances?
  2. What would be the most prominent difference to the listener if music did not possess consistent tone quality, intonation, balance, blend, and phrasing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The use of sight-reading skills builds a foundation for musical literacy just as decoding a story for the first time builds fluent readers.
  2. Sight reading new music assesses a musician's ability to apply foundational knowledge about musical symbols and tempo indications.
  3. Use of varying tone in music transfers to use of voice in speech and theatre presentations.
  4. Music software can be used to adjust tone quality, phrasing, and tempo to compare and contrast various styles.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians use sight-reading fluency as indicators of musical leadership.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate understanding of major and minor scales

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Sing or play two major scales in keys appropriate for their instrument or voice (DOK 1-2)
  2. Sing or play one minor scale in keys appropriate for their instrument or voice (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to play or sing scales?
  2. How is music built upon patterns found in major and minor scales?
  3. How did prolific composers in history adjust the use of scale structure to develop new genres and styles of music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Music is built upon patterns found in the major and minor scales and can be compared to the base 10 system in mathematics.
  2. Modalities of music are foundational to creating an emotional quality in music used in mass media and society.
  3. Identifying modalities improves listening skills.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians rely upon the flexible thinking needed to identify the many patterns music uses within the major and minor modes.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform using enhanced musical techniques

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform four-part vocal and/or instrumental rounds, using movement, and speech (DOK 1-3)
  2. Respond to the conductor for phrasing and dynamics (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate proper care of voice and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does performance in an ensemble encourage teamwork?
  2. How do you produce a good singing voice or sound on your instrument?
  3. What is the role of a conductor?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Relating music used in historical and societal events to cultural genre and style using different musical techniques can give insight to music's role in society and how cultures choose to express the same things differently. (Funeral music varies from culture to culture.)
  2. Demonstration of proper care of voice and instruments, and response to the conductor aids in the understanding of music ensemble protocol.
  3. Computer music software increasingly occupies a place in performance as well as composition.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform more complex rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform patterns that include the following rhythms: sixteenth/sixteenth-eighth, eighth-sixteenth/sixteenth, eighth-quarter-eighth, and ties (DOK 1-2)
  2. Perform patterns that include the pitches of the major scale (DOK 1-2)
  3. Perform I-IV-V chords in the keys of C, F, and G (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does harmony add to music?
  2. How does syncopation affect the feel of music?
  3. How does music stimulate visual ideas, feelings, and perception?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Performance of rhythmic patterns in music can be related to patterns found in mathematics.
  2. Performance of basic chord structures shows how basic harmony follows a distinct, repeatable pattern.
  3. Electronic keyboards allow students to understand chord structure kinesthetically, aurally, and visually.

Nature Of:

  1. Basic music reading skills are necessary to become a literate musician.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Perform melodies using traditional notation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Play and sing notated melodies (12 to 16 measures) with attention to pitch, rhythm, and expressive qualities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Play and sing simple melodic notation in treble clef in major and minor keys (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What knowledge is needed to read and perform music?
  2. How is music like a language?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Most music contains a theme just as a story contains a main idea.
  2. Music software, audio devices, and keyboards can be used to learn and perform melodies.
  3. Knowledge of how melody is used, depending on culture, style, and genre, gives insight and predictability to the inherent musical structure of various music literatures.

Nature Of:

  1. Melody is the core of a musical message.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform using accurate production techniques

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform three-part vocal and/or instrumental rounds, using movement, and speech (DOK 1-3)
  2. Watch the conductor and follow meter patterns, tempo, and dynamic changes (DOK 1-3)
  3. Perform using correct posture, breathing, and diction (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does performance in an ensemble encourage teamwork?
  2. How does correct posture, breathing, and diction affect a performance?
  3. Why is it important for the performer to watch the conductor?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Concepts in mathematics, reading, and other contents can be taught through simple musical compositions.
  2. Understanding similarities and differences between music prevalent in Colorado and other regions of the United States gives insight to Colorado history.
  3. Demonstration of responsible personal and social behaviors in musical settings can be used to assess a fundamental understanding of societal norms in performance.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform a variety of rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform patterns that include do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, high do, low sol, low la pitches and dotted quarter-eighth, triplet rhythms (DOK 1-2)
  2. Perform I-IV-V accompaniments in simple keys (DOK 1-2)
  3. Perform melodic and rhythmic ostinati individually (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do changes in rhythm change a message in music?
  2. How do accompaniments affect music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Patterns in rhythm changes can be related to fractions in mathematics.
  2. Music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles vary in their use of melodic and rhythmic patterns.
  3. Mass media uses melodic and rhythmic patterns to make music memorable to serve purposes such as selling a product (jingles); create easy auditory recall (theme songs for commercials, news casts, sitcoms, and film); and deliver a message (musical montage of patriotism).
  4. Music software, electronic keyboards, and audio devices can be used to play accompaniments, ostinati, and a variety of rhythmic and melodic patterns.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicianship is built upon pattern recognition.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Perform extended melodies from the treble staff using traditional notation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Play and sing simple notated melodies (8 to 12 measures) with attention to pitch, rhythm, and expressive qualities (DOK 1-3)
  2. Play and sing simple songs in major keys (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What knowledge is needed to read and perform music?
  2. How is music like a language that helps people communicate?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Math songs, works songs, celebration songs, holiday songs, and patriotic songs can be used to teach a wide variety of content knowledge for easy recall of facts, sequence, and process.
  2. Music software and audio devices can be used to isolate particular measures in songs to highlight unique qualities in pitch, rhythm, and expressive qualities.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical compositions often demonstrate the main idea of a message through the melody.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform from memory and use simple traditional notation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use correct vocal and instrumental techniques when singing and playing instruments (DOK 1-2)
  2. Recognize and follow conductor's beat patterns and gestures (DOK 1-3)
  3. Perform expressively for peers in a large or small group setting (DOK 1-3)
  4. Play and sing simple notated melodies (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important for ensembles to work as a team?
  2. Why is it important to understand conducting patterns?
  3. How does identifying patterns help with memorization?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Following a conductor's beat leads to a synthesis of visual and auditory stimuli.
  2. Understanding the physiological aspects of correct posture, breathing, and technique leads to an understanding of the biological aspects of good music production.
  3. Music software can be used to assist in memorization.
  4. Performance skill can be isolated and adjusted using audio and/or video devices to record, compare, and/or evaluate the result of different techniques.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform extended rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform more complex patterns that include do, re, mi, sol, la, high do, low sol, and low la (extended pentatonic scale) and sixteenth and dotted half notes (DOK 1-2)
  2. Perform rhythmic and melodic ostinati in small groups (DOK 1-3)
  3. Perform a steady beat while contrasting rhythms are being played (DOK 1-2)
  4. Perform I-V accompaniments in simple keys (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are beat and rhythm different?
  2. Why is repetition and/or pattern important in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Recognizing that patterns occur in music as in other parts of life builds the ability to find connections in the world.
  2. Identifying patterns in music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles enables listeners to find similarities and differences in each.
  3. Music software companies develop programs and electronic keyboards that allow a solo, novice performer to create more complex rhythmic and harmonic musical phrases and compositions.

Nature Of:

  1. Basic music reading skills are necessary to become a literate musician.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Expressively perform simple songs in small groups or independently

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform two-part rounds using speech, body percussion, singing, movement, and instruments (DOK 1-3)
  2. Follow conductor's cues demonstrating dynamic changes, tempo changes, and fermata (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is a good singing voice?
  2. How does music make you feel different?
  3. Why do performing groups have conductors?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Counting songs, spelling songs, celebration songs, holiday songs, and patriotic songs can be used to deliver content knowledge in musical ways.
  2. Singing songs focused on phonemic awareness and using cross body movements aids in reading and writing skill.
  3. Music software and audio devices can be used to demonstrate dynamic changes, tempo changes, and fermatas.
  4. Learning to sing along productively with others demonstrates teamwork.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform simple rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform four- and eight-beat patterns that include do, re, mi, sol, la pitches (pentatonic scale) and half notes, whole notes, half rests, and whole rests (DOK 1-2)
  2. Play tonic chord accompaniments in simple keys (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Are rests as important as notes in music?
  2. How do accompaniments change a song?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Mathematic patterns can be identified in music.
  2. There are cultural and historical styles and genres of music that can be identified by their similarities and differences in the simple patterns used in the music.
  3. Music software and audio devices can be used to demonstrate pentatonic scales and tonic chord accompaniments in simple keys.
  4. When performers respond to patterns and symbols of music, they are communicating a composer's message just as a reader is communicating an author's message.

Nature Of:

  1. Music communicates a message.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Expressively perform using simple techniques in groups and independently

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use the head voice to produce a light, clear sound (DOK 1-2)
  2. Maintain steady beat (DOK 1-2)
  3. Respond to cues of a conductor for stopping and starting (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to keep a steady beat?
  2. How is singing similar to speaking?
  3. What is the role of the conductor?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Use of nursery rhymes, counting songs, spelling songs, celebration songs, holiday songs, and patriotic songs enables varying ways to teach content skills.
  2. Singing songs focusing on phonemic awareness and songs that use cross body movements aid in the physiological needs of beginning reading skills.
  3. Understanding responsible personal and social behaviors in musical settings gives insights to societal expectations in similar group settings.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Perform basic rhythmic and melodic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Perform four-beat patterns that include sol-mi-la or mi-re-do pitches and quarter notes, eighth notes and quarter rests (DOK 1-2)
  2. Play simple patterns (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do the beats in music relate to counting in math?
  2. Why is it important to follow music symbols when performing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Simple songs can be used to teach content such as counting, spelling, literature sequencing, and scientific topics.
  2. Tracking music on a page aids in developing skills needed in beginning reading.
  3. Audio devices and music software can be used to demonstrate simple four-beat patterns.

Nature Of:

  1. When performers respond to patterns and symbols of music, they are communicating a composer's message just as a reader is communicating an author's message.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform independently

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Distinguish between speaking and singing voice (DOK 1)
  2. Sing a variety of simple songs and singing games (DOK 1-2)
  3. Echo and perform simple melodic and rhythmic patterns (DOK 1-2)
  4. Demonstrate basic performance skills and behaviors (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the difference between speaking and singing?
  2. How does performing songs help you learn?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using music together with dance, theatre, and the visual arts aids in early reading skills such as storytelling and sequencing skills.
  2. Music software and audio and/or video devices can be used to demonstrate speaking and singing voices, simple songs, and patterns.
  3. Electronic keyboards can be used to echo and perform simple melodic and rhythmic patterns.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Respond to music with movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move to music, demonstrating awareness of beat, tempo, dynamics, and melodic direction, reflecting changes in mood or form (DOK 1-2)
  2. Move to music, differentiating between sound and silence (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does different music change the way you feel?
  2. How does music help to express the music you hear?
  3. Is silence a part of music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using developmentally appropriate movements to express music demonstrates ability to follow musical elements.
  2. Using movement to respond to music aids in long-term memory development.
  3. Gross motor skills are refined when responding to music through movement.
  4. Audio devices can be used to demonstrate varying types of music and the use of rests within simple songs.

Nature Of:

  1. Expressing music through movement and dance is an important part of all cultures.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 1. Expression of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Perform expressively

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use voices expressively when speaking, chanting, and singing (DOK 1-3)
  2. Sing a variety of simple songs and singing games (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate fundamental performance skills such as correct posture and behavior (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is music sung using different types of voices?
  2. Does everyone feel the same way when they hear different kinds of music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Performing nursery rhymes, counting songs, letter songs, holiday songs, patriotic songs, and other songs leads to engagement and building early skills and sequencing ability.
  2. Using songs, singing games, and dances from various cultures, genres, and styles aids in cultural awareness.
  3. Audio devices can be used to play various types of music for a variety of purposes.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicality is the ability to perform and respond to music in meaningful ways.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Respond to rhythmic patterns and elements of music using expressive movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move to music of various tempos, meters, dynamics, modes, genres, and styles (DOK 1-2)
  2. Move or use body percussion to demonstrate awareness of beat and tempo (DOK 1-2)
  3. Match movement to rhythmic patterns (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do people move to music?
  2. Is there a right way to move to music? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using developmentally appropriate movements in responding to music from various cultures, genres, and styles aids in cultural awareness.
  2. Music software and electronic keyboards can be used to adjust tempo, meter, and styles for student response and movement.

Nature Of:

  1. Responding to music through movement and dance is an important part of all cultures.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Performance Pathway
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Improvise a stylistically appropriate vocal or instrumental solo over a given pattern of harmonic progressions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Play and/or sing individually or in ensembles, employing appropriate harmonic and non-harmonic tones in relationship to chords (DOK 1-3)
  2. Play in rhythmically appropriate style (such as swing eighth notes if playing bebop style) (DOK 1-3)
  3. Play extended cohesive musical ideas, not fragments, paced and shaped appropriately according to length of given solo (DOK 1-4)
  4. Vary musical material when re-approaching same harmonic progressions (improvises rather than composes) (DOK 2-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the meaning of "stylistically appropriate"?
  2. How do jazz musicians learn to choose pitches that are integrated into harmonic configurations?
  3. How does a performer develop a sense of what is appropriate in terms of rhythm, pitch, and style?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Spontaneously creating music within various styles allows performers and composers to be relevant to a variety of audiences in a variety of settings.
  2. Understanding composers from different eras allows students to create music in multiple genres, thereby improving their understanding of relevant history.
  3. Composing in various genres allows students to realize the historical and cultural significance of music.
  4. Accessing recordings and Internet sources of historically authentic performances gives students a unique perspective and basis for comparison of today's culture.
  5. Using music software to support or enhance vocal and instrumental improvisation in various styles and harmonic progressions provides opportunities for musical experiences outside the classroom.
  6. Demonstrating adaptability by changing strategies when necessary to achieve success transfers to critical abilities in other disciplines and life pursuits.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical improvisation provides for increased freedom of expression, exploration in multiple genres of music, encourages creativity, and improves self-confidence.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Compose complex music in several distinct styles

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Compose music incorporating appropriate voicing and ranges (DOK 3-4)
  2. Use a variety of sounds, notational, and technological sources to compose music (DOK 3-4)
  3. Notate original musical ideas using traditional notation with a variety of clefs (DOK 1-3)
  4. Notate original musical ideas using nontraditional notation, as appropriate (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is important to understand traditional notation when composing music?
  2. How does the element of style affect choices of sounds, voicings, etc.?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to create music provides a medium for meaningful self-expression.
  2. Understanding the use of traditional notation allows the preservation of original musical ideas for others to use.
  3. Understanding how composers make their livelihood leads to respect for copyright laws.
  4. Understanding how music applies to a variety of careers enables students to consider nontraditional pathways.
  5. Using current technologies expands the possibilities for working with sound and making creative musical decisions.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical composition adds to the existing body of artistic works, provides for preservation of unique ideas, and may be used as a means of expression.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Arrange selections for voices or instruments other than those for which they were written in ways that preserve and enhance the expressive effect of the music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Arrange music incorporating appropriate voicing and ranges (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use a variety of sound, notational, and technological sources to arrange music (DOK 1-3)
  3. Notate arranged musical ideas using traditional notation with a variety of clefs (DOK 1-3)
  4. Notate arranged musical ideas using nontraditional notation, as appropriate (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it necessary to understand instrumentation and voicing when arranging music?
  2. How is an understanding of traditional notation important to arranging music?
  3. How can one devise their own means of notating sound for others to use?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Recognizing and manipulating timbre and combinations of sounds allows one to arrange music for a variety of settings and purposes.
  2. Comparing an arrangement with the original work develops awareness of how music is used to affect mood and action within society (advertising, patriotism, etc.).
  3. Using timbres and combinations of sounds that are used in the music of a specific culture leads to increased awareness of that culture and circumstances surrounding the development of its music.
  4. Changing musical elements within music by using various software programs provides a means by which one can manipulate the character or mood of the original work and demonstrate originality and inventiveness in work.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians have an infinite number of choices with regard to combinations of musical elements, all of which have a perceivable affect on the resulting character of the musical product.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Generalist Pathway
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Extended improvisation over varied harmonic progressions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise a rudimentary instrumental solo over harmonic progressions. (DOK 2-3)
  2. Improvise a rudimentary vocal solo over a harmonic progressions (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is the skill of improvisation desirable to a musician?
  2. How do musicians learn to choose pitches (and rhythms) that are appropriate for a given harmonic progression?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to improvise a melody over a harmonic progression using technology as a tool allows one to experiment with their ideas in a non-performance setting.
  2. The freedom to experiment with improvisation provides for a wide variety of musical possibilities, making each experience unique and relevant to the user.
  3. Improvisation provides a means of musical expression and experimentation that is not dependent upon a requisite level of technical skill.
  4. Contemporary music relies on improvisation and manipulation of basic harmonic progressions to deliver a "fresh" sound to the consumer.
  5. Technology allows performers of all musical skill levels to improvise using voice or instrumental modalities to create original works as a means of personal or group expression.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical improvisation is relevant to other disciplines as well as in everyday life; a means of problem-solving.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Create original music, or arrange the music of others, using appropriate technology

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create a musical product using original or borrowed musical material, electronic sounds or environmental sounds from one or more sources (DOK 2-4)
  2. Use one or more of the techniques of sequencing, mixing, overdubbing, and layering (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to understand the basic elements of music (rhythm, tone color) when composing using technology-assisted programs?
  2. How does a working knowledge of standard music notation enhance the ability to create original music when using technology as a tool?
  3. Should contemporary musicians be allowed to use new arrangements of existing music to sell their own music? Why or why not?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The use of appropriate technology allows opportunities for creative personal expression by all individuals regardless of musical skill and knowledge level.
  2. Technology that may be used as a tool for musical expression is widely available, is relatively simple to learn, and expands the opportunities for working with sound.
  3. Music created in this manner may be used to enhance the relevance and effectiveness of work in other disciplines (such as literature, visual art, and public speaking)
  4. The problem-solving and invention skills used to create original works or new arrangements can be transferred to other real-world applications such as but not limited to graphic design, highway engineering, software game design, and political initiatives.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical technology makes it possible for anyone to participate in musical expression without the necessity of involvement in formal performance activities.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create music using melodic and harmonic sequences

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Notate a melodic pattern in sequence, of at least 12 measures, adding tonal accompaniment; may utilize current technology (DOK 1-3)
  2. Notate a harmonic pattern in sequence, of at least 12 measures; may utilize current technology (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do patterns in music relate to similar patterns found in other disciplines such as literature and visual art?
  2. How does the presence or absence of tonal accompaniment affect choices made of melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic patterns?
  3. Why is it important to use some form of notation when creating musical ideas?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Experiences in creating music may lead one to consider further participation and career opportunities in music.
  2. The ability to use music notation and current technology provides a means for experimentation and self-expression while hearing, seeing, and preserving original ideas.
  3. Using notation to communicate a musical message builds an understanding of the connection of musical notation and the written word.

Nature Of:

  1. Music composition and notation of melodies, rhythms, and harmonies demonstrates one's understanding of the elements of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Arrange a simple existing composition

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create a new arrangement of an existing vocal composition using different voices (DOK 2-3)
  2. Create a new arrangement of an existing instrumental composition (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some benefits of being able to adapt an existing piece of music to other uses?
  2. What are some differences between arranging and composing?
  3. How do copyright laws affect choices that are made in altering the original composition?
  4. Why is it important to know how to arrange music when someone can just purchase it?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to arrange favorite songs from a variety of cultures, genres, or styles for their instrument or voice part allows one to adapt music for their own purposes.
  2. Using music technology enables one to make immediate changes to arrangements and then describe the effect they have on the composition.
  3. The process and outcome of making changes to various components of an object without altering its fundamental character may be observed in numerous other disciplines and vocations (such as creating varying levels of strength of steel or concrete or use of color contrasts when creating art)
  4. Using music software and musicians, advertisers alter original arrangement of familiar music to have potential customers favor new products.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians have an infinite number of choices with regard to combinations of musical elements, all of which have a perceivable effect on the resulting character of the musical product.
  2. Musicians create new sounds and new rhythms with original pieces of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Improvise over simple harmonic progressions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise a 12-bar solo instrumentally over a three-chord pattern using varied rhythmic, melodic, or harmonic patterns (DOK 2-3)
  2. Improvise a 12-bar solo vocally over a three-chord pattern using varied rhythmic, melodic, or harmonic patterns (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some instances in which improvisation may be used?
  2. Are there rules in improvisation?
  3. What other disciplines use improvisation and how?
  4. What are the different considerations when using improvisation as a soloist versus an ensemble?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to improvise in a variety of styles and settings enables performers to be relevant to a wide variety of situations and audiences.
  2. Listening to recorded examples of improvisation assists one in developing a "sense" of what is effective and desirable.
  3. The use of technology to provide repeated accompaniment allows one to develop skill in improvisation.
  4. The ability to improvise is useful in a number of disciplines and real-world situations such as engineers who create a new alternative for designing buildings in an earthquake-prone environment, home decorators and fashion designers wanting to create a new trend, and talk show hosts adapting an interview based on the revelations their guests reveal.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical improvisation provides for increased freedom of expression and exploration in multiple genres of music, encourages creativity, and improves self-confidence.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create four to eight measures of music melodically and rhythmically

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Notate a combination of melodic and rhythmic patterns of four to eight measures; may utilize current technology with or without tonal accompaniment (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create new music in a given genre or style with melodic phrases or sentences of moderate length (DOK 2-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a working knowledge of standard notation assist in preserving musical ideas and thoughts?
  2. How do composers go about imagining and creating musical works?
  3. What is meant by the term "style"?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using music technology enables students to hear original musical ideas for purposes of evaluation and further refinement.
  2. Using notation allows one to preserve their original musical ideas.
  3. Imagining and creating an observable product has numerous applications in a variety of arts and non-arts disciplines (invention of new consumer products, designing new software applications, or creating a new recipe),
  4. Current technologies expand possibilities for working with sound and capturing or notating original ideas (recording live through digital audio a melody that has been notated).

Nature Of:

  1. Musical composition and notation of melodies, rhythms, and harmonies demonstrates one's understanding of the elements of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Improvise short melodic phrases over accompaniment

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise melodies instrumentally of 4-8 measures while accompanied by a two-chord progression (DOK 2-3)
  2. Improvise melodies vocally of 4-8 measures while accompanied by a two-chord progression (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When has improvisation been used in music historically?
  2. What guidelines are used in improvisation?
  3. What other disciplines use improvisation and how?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Finding, listening to, emulating, and discussing recorded examples of musical improvisation assists one in developing improvisational skill.
  2. Using technology provides accompaniment for one to practice improvisational technique.
  3. Improvising is used by contemporary musicians to develop new music that will appeal to consumers.
  4. Relying on improvisation allows actors and comedians to make a performance authentic to the viewer.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical improvisation provides for increased freedom of expression and exploration in multiple genres of music, encourages creativity, and improves self-confidence.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create melodic and rhythmic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Notate a combination of simple melodic patterns with structured parameters using current technology with or without tonal accompaniment (DOK 1-3)
  2. Notate a combination of simple rhythmic patterns with structured parameters using current technology with or without tonal accompaniment (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a working knowledge of notation assist in composing original musical ideas?
  2. How could the process of composition be described or explained?
  3. How are patterns used in creating original musical works?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology provides a more expanded resource by which performers may create and perform original compositions and preserve musical ideas.
  2. Experiences in composing music provide insights into the career of a musician.
  3. Simultaneously seeing, hearing, and using notation provides a more complete musical experience through critical thinking and synthesis.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical composition and notation of melodies, rhythms, and harmonies demonstrate one's understanding of the elements of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Improvise call-and-response patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate preparatory improvisations using a two- to four-note call and response rhythmically (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate preparatory improvisations using a two- to four-note call and response melodically. (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the origin of call and response?
  2. How does this historical practice relate to improvisation, both earlier and later in time?
  3. How are the two components similar and different?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Gaining an understanding of historical practices in call and response music provides insights into cultures of the past.
  2. Evaluating and discussing historical recordings enables one to improve and refine improvisational skills.
  3. Call and response is closely related to syntax and context in literature.
  4. Call and response techniques are used in many real-world applications such as at athletic events to build crowd support, public speakers to emphasize a critical point, and storytellers to interact with their audience.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical improvisation provides for increased freedom of expression and exploration in multiple genres of music, encourages creativity, and improves self-confidence.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Improvise question and answer and basic musical phrases

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise completion of a given rhythmic or melodic phrase, giving attention to similarities of question and answer in length of phrase, meter, mood, etc. (DOK 2-3)
  2. Improvise instrumentally and vocally using I-IV-V chords in 12 bar blues form (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does improvising music help students to create and express ideas?
  2. What are the elements of a good improvisation?
  3. When should a musician improvise?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Discussion of contemporary examples of music that contain improvisational elements gives insight to the practical importance of this skill.
  2. Audio and/or video devices are used to play call-and-response improvisational pieces to demonstrate technique and variables musicians use.
  3. An understanding of the origins of the blues form gives insight to its impact on American history.
  4. Music software and electronic keyboards can be used for improvising or accompanying improvisations.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical improvisation allows people to create a vision that is enacted upon through motivation and curiosity.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notate simple compositions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create an eight-measure melody using the treble staff (DOK 2-4)
  2. Reproduce notated 8-measure melody provided by the teacher, using the treble staff (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to learn how to notate melodies or rhythms that are played?
  2. Are there rules in composing?
  3. Do compositions have patterns?
  4. What jobs require composing skill?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Software and other tools of technology are used to create music.
  2. Understanding how other disciplines create something new builds the ability to transfer musical skills into other activities.
  3. Identifying the similarities and differences between composers in two different historical eras provides an understanding of how prominent composition styles in music history evolved.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians rely on knowing and understanding various notations and terms to write and create music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Improvise simple musical phrases

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise completion of a given rhythmic or melodic phrase (DOK 2-3)
  2. Improvise short phrases using the pitches of the diatonic scale (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does improvising music create a unique sound?
  2. Is it easier to improvise with an instrument or with a voice? Give a rationale for the belief.
  3. Why is improvisation important?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Application of select criteria builds the ability to judge the quality of improvisation.
  2. Software and other tools of technology aid in improvising music.
  3. Explanation of the importance of the mathematical pattern in a diatonic scale demonstrates the depth of understanding in how a diatonic scale is constructed.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating music is a form of self-expression.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notate simple musical selections

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create 4- to 8-measures using known rhythms and pitches on a treble clef staff (DOK 2-4)
  2. Follow prescribed criteria when notating (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is writing music related to writing stories?
  2. Why is knowing prescribed criteria important when writing music?
  3. Do different cultures notate music differently?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the basic structural elements used to write short musical phrases provides a foundation to understanding the structural elements of more complex musical compositions.
  2. Musical notation can be compared with notation of other disciplines (such as theatre stage directions, mathematical notation, vocal diction notation (IPA), dance notation)
  3. Discussing the common criteria used to notate music in at least one historical era (classical, baroque, etc.) provides insight into key differences in varying styles and genres of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians rely on knowing and understanding various notations and terms to write and create music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create short musical phrases and patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise four measures within a musical selection (DOK 2-3)
  2. Create short rhythmic and melodic ostinati in question-and-answer form (DOK 2-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is question and answer form used in various styles of music?
  2. How is improvisation used in other disciplines?
  3. How is creating a new musical phrase similar to or different from creating a new solution in science?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using software and other tools of technology to improvise short musical segments within existing tunes provides opportunities to experience success in creating basic musical phrases.
  2. Using developmentally appropriate movements to improvise with music helps illustrate the expressive elements in music
  3. Creating new music or improvising within music requires risk taking and critical-thinking abilities.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating music is a form of self-expression.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notate music using basic notation structure

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create phrases using learned rhythms and pitches on a treble clef staff (DOK 2-4)
  2. Apply teacher-defined criteria to determine accuracy of notation (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to use specific criteria when notating?
  2. How is specific criteria in notation similar to specific criteria in writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using software and other technology tools to create treble clef phrases provides assistance to novice learners to successfully notate music.
  2. Comparing elements of rhythm and pitch in existing treble clef phrases leads to a fundamental understanding of basic structure in music.
  3. Recognizing basic notation structure in music can be transferred to one's ability to write a structured sentence in literature, which provides the understanding that music is a language.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians rely on knowing and understanding various notations and terms to write and create music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create musical phrases in the form of simple question-and-answer alone and in small groups

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise short instrumental phrases using the l-s-m-r-d tone-set (DOK 2-3)
  2. Improvise question-and-answer phrases (DOK 2-3)
  3. Create movements to express pitch, tempo, form and dynamics in music (DOK 2-4)
  4. Improvise instrumentally and/or vocally over the I chord in simple keys (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does movement demonstrate what we hear?
  2. Do people only improvise in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using developmentally appropriate movement to respond to music identifies a listeners reaction to the elements used in music.
  2. Using discernment between an existing piece of music and one that has been improvised provides the ability to focus on detail aurally, which strengthens auditory abilities to follow directions, hear phonemic differences, and identify aural patterns in numeracy.
  3. Recognizing the mathematical pattern in simple chords develops strong mathematical sequencing helpful in understanding number lines, simple fractions, and skip counting.

Nature Of:

  1. Creating and responding to music through movement are forms of self-expression.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify rhythmic and melodic notation patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create patterns using learned rhythms on a treble clef staff (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create patterns using learned pitches in a treble clef staff (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Does music have pattern?
  2. Where else can you find patterns?
  3. Why are patterns important in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Software and other technology tools aid in finding patterns in music.
  2. The ability to find patterns in other disciplines (such as mathematics, visual art, dance, spelling) provides a connection to a deeper understanding of patterns in society.
  3. Describing how patterns change in various songs from different cultures, historical eras, styles, and genres provides insight to how various styles and genres of music are similar and different.
  4. Discussing how simple songs are used in commercials or other mass media creates a connection to how music is used in society.

Nature Of:

  1. Music has many patterns.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate creation of short, independent musical phrases and sounds alone and with others

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create instrumental and vocal sounds to accompany poems, rhymes, and stories (DOK 1-3)
  2. Improvise short phrases using the l-s-m or m-r-d tone-set (DOK 2-3)
  3. Use movement to demonstrate grade-level concepts such as changes in dynamics, AB form, etc. (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do some melodies sound better than others?
  2. How does movement demonstrate what people hear?
  3. How does music tell a story?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using software and other technology to create music aids in helping the beginning musician successfully create music.
  2. The ability to explain why one type of music matches a story better than another type of music builds an understanding of the connection of how literature tells a story and how music tells a story.
  3. Improvising to simple phrases and reacting to dynamics and form in music are the foundation to understanding the fundamental structures of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music tells a story.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify musical patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create patterns using known rhythms and pitches (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use iconic notation within the treble staff (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does constructing something new help you create and express ideas?
  2. Why is it important that you learn the notation of music that is performed?
  3. Where else can you find patterns?
  4. Why are patterns important in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Young minds rely on patterns to interact with and understand the world around them.
  2. Demonstrating how patterns change in various songs from different cultures, historical eras, styles, and genres builds a fundamental respect for differences.
  3. Using iconic notation for what is heard in music is the first step in developing an understanding of the musical language just as invented spelling is used to identify what is heard in spoken language.

Nature Of:

  1. Music has many patterns.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Create music through a variety of experiences

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise sound effects and simple songs to stories or poems (DOK 2-3)
  2. Use movement to demonstrate loud/soft, fast/slow, high/low, sound/silence, and beat/no beat (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do some melodies sound better than others?
  2. How does movement demonstrate what people hear?
  3. How does music tell a story?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using software and other technology to demonstrate musical opposites of loud/soft, fast/slow, high/low, sound/silence, and beat/no beat provides an opportunity to give a multitude of global, musical examples.
  2. Using developmentally appropriate movement when responding to musical opposites aids in assessing understanding of opposites in language.
  3. Explaining where opposites can be found in other disciplines (reading, mathematic symbols +/-, visual art) provides an opportunity for transfer of knowledge, building long-term memory.
  4. Explaining why certain sounds can be matched with certain characters (loud and low = Papa Bear, soft and high = Baby Bear) gives a multisensory opportunity to experience literature or drama.

Nature Of:

  1. Music tells a story.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identify simple musical patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use icons or invented symbols to represent beat (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to use symbols to identify what is heard?
  2. Where else can you find patterns?
  3. Why are patterns important in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using simple software and other technology tools to create sounds provides a diverse array of auditory examples of sounds heard in society.
  2. The ability to identify repeated patterns in simple songs provides a developmentally appropriate foundation to understanding patterns in society.

Nature Of:

  1. Music has many patterns.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 2. Creation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Improvise movement and sound responses to music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Improvise sound effects to accompany play activities (DOK 2)
  2. Use improvised movement to demonstrate musical awareness (DOK 2-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does movement change when music changes?
  2. Can music tell a story?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using video devices to demonstrate how people respond to music with movement can provide a more global connection to music and movement
  2. Demonstrating ways movement changes when music changes gives young people an opportunity to express what they are feeling without words.
  3. Creating an original piece of artwork based off of music (such as short/fast strokes for short/fast music; long, wavy strokes for smooth musical phrases) provides an assessment of musical awareness.

Nature Of:

  1. Music can move us.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Performance Pathway
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Interpretation of notated of musical elements and ideas

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify musical elements in written form (DOK 1)
  2. Describe the uses of elements of music and expressive devices with appropriate musical vocabulary (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to understand the different transpositions for various instruments (such as Bb, Eb, C, etc.)?
  2. Why is it important to understand varied orchestrations in diverse repertoire?
  3. How can mathematical proofs be related to music?
  4. Why is it important to know the timbre of each voice and instrument?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Being able to transpose allows one to rehearse and perform with other instrumentations.
  2. Music technology, such as music notation and sequencing software or interactive music websites, can be used to analyze and produce music notation.
  3. Ability to compare and contrast aural examples from various cultures leads to discernment of the unique qualities of the culture.
  4. Utilizing accurate musical vocabulary allows people to communicate using the language of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical sound is organized through the use of musical symbols.
  2. Musical understanding requires gathering data through different senses.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Classification by genre, style, historical period, or culture

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical genre and explain the reasoning for the classification (such as rock, jazz, classical) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical style and explain the reasoning for the classification (classical or baroque, bebop or swing) (DOK 1-2)
  3. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical/historical period and explain the reasoning for the classification (renaissance or baroque, ?80s pop or ?50s rock) (DOK 1-2)
  4. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given culture and explain the reasoning for the classification (Indonesian Gamelan or Japanese Koto) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should people examine music from cultures other than their own?
  2. Why do some cultures not have a word in their native language for music?
  3. How can we come to understand the connections of music and society?
  4. How does music impact the video and film world?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically significant events have an impact on current and future music.
  2. An understanding of distinguishing characteristics of musical genre allows people to articulate why diversity in music is important.
  3. The Internet provides access to various genres and styles of music as well as music from different historical periods and cultures.

Nature Of:

  1. The unique uses of musical elements are the determining factors for the cultural and historical origins of a given musical work.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Evaluation of music using critical, informed analysis

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify basic elements of written examples of music using appropriate musical vocabulary (DOK 1)
  2. Apply specific criteria from similar or exemplary models in evaluating music of compositions, arrangements, and improvisations (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does one develop the skills to analyze, assess, and evaluate music?
  2. What determines someone's criteria when evaluating music?
  3. How is personal preference for music developed?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Being able to describe and analyze music gives one a more in-depth understanding of music as a whole.
  2. Evaluating compositions enables one to become a better performer.
  3. Using appropriate vocabulary helps one successfully participate in various performance activities.
  4. Comparing an original work of music with an arrangement of the same piece identifies ways to critique music just as comparisons of adapted works of art, political speeches, or athletic performances are used to critique in society.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical knowledge is broadened through an informed viewpoint. Music evaluation requires a developed understanding of music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Generalist Pathway
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Discernment of musical elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe at a basic level aural examples of a varied repertoire of music by describing the uses of elements of music and expressive devices with appropriate musical vocabulary (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify basic elements of written examples of music using appropriate musical vocabulary (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do musical elements differ in music from various cultures?
  2. Why is it important to be able to discriminate musical elements when listening to various repertoire?
  3. How can people learn to understand the use of the different elements of music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to compare and contrast the important musical elements from various cultures allows people to understand the importance music plays in a particular culture.
  2. Digital technology can be used to hear musical compositions and allow one to identify and describe the musical elements in the compositions.
  3. Understanding how the elements of music affect the musical message helps people to discern how music is used to influence society.
  4. Using accurate musical vocabulary allows people to communicate clearly about music.

Nature Of:

  1. All music uses the same elements but in different ways.
  2. Knowing the elements of music helps people to understand music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Classification by genre, style, historical period or culture

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical genre and explain the reasoning for the classification (rock, jazz, classical) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical style and explain the reasoning for the classification (classical or baroque, bebop or swing) (DOK 1-2)
  3. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given musical or historical period and explain the reasoning for the classification (renaissance or baroque, ?80s pop or ?50s rock) (DOK 1-2)
  4. Classify and describe unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music from a given culture and explain the reasoning for the classification (Indonesian Gamelan or Japanese Koto) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why should people examine music from cultures other than their own?
  2. What is the importance of examining music from different historical periods, cultures and traditions?
  3. How, when, and why is music used in the community?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically significant events have an impact on current and future music.
  2. Understanding distinguishing characteristics of musical genre allows one to articulate why diversity in music is important.
  3. The Internet provides access to various genres and styles of music as well as music from different historical periods and cultures and situates music in a cultural context.
  4. Identifying the cultural characteristics of music aids in identifying and understanding different cultures.

Nature Of:

  1. Music is unique to function, nationality, culture, time, and other factors, but use the same elements.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Transcription, and rhythmic demonstration of multiple, changing meter signatures

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Transcribe or demonstrate rhythms within musical examples that incorporate combinations of dotted notes and corresponding rests in various meters (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate written rhythms using various tempo and dynamic markings (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do meter changes affect the personality of a song?
  2. When are multiple meters used most often in the history of music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various genres reflect varied meter signatures.
  2. Melody reflects a specific style by the way it is written or presented.
  3. Meter signature changes vary in historical, American, and other cultural music.
  4. Digital sequencing software can assist one to hear the effects of using different rhythms.

Nature Of:

  1. Rhythm communicates an idea, emotion, or mood.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notation of level 2 compositions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Read notes on a staff including four or more ledger lines above or below the staff (DOK 1)
  2. Identify and notate I, IV, V, V7, I chord progressions in a given key signature (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can knowing the notes above and below the staff increase musicianship skills?
  2. How can the use of musical elements affect formal structure?
  3. What determines the levels of difficulty in a composition?
  4. How is music evolutionary?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the use of notes and clefs allows one to read increasingly difficult levels of music.
  2. Notation software assists one in understanding music notation.
  3. Understanding of the relevance of music notation in historical contexts provides background and appreciation for current and future notation practices.
  4. Form in music has a correlation to form in other disciplines (such as dance, visual arts and design, literature).

Nature Of:

  1. Notation is the language of music and may be more or less complex according to intent.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identification of musical elements in a level 2 (difficulty rating scale)composition or performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, using a minimum of four markings (articulation, dynamic and tempo), when analyzing a musical example (DOK 1-2)
  2. Given prescribed criteria, identify the form of a composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do musical elements form the structure of a music composition?
  2. Why is it important to analyze compositions based on the use of musical elements?
  3. Why is it important to have leveled compositions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to read various articulation symbols allows one to understand a musical idea.
  2. Musical elements can be compared with other disciplines in written, oral presentations, and multimedia projects.
  3. Different musical elements can be easily experimented with when using notation and sequencing software.
  4. An understanding of differences in criteria in composition levels provides guidance in choosing appropriate literature.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique combinations of musical elements create form, complexity, effect, etc.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identification and rhythmic demonstration of multiple, changing meter signatures in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Transcribe or demonstrate rhythms within musical examples that incorporate triplet, eighth, and sixteenth rhythms and corresponding rests in 6/8 meter signatures (DOK 1-2)
  2. Transcribe or demonstrate rhythms within musical examples that incorporate triplet, eighth, and sixteenth rhythms and corresponding rests in cut time meter signatures (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to be able to differentiate between various styles of music and its use of meter?
  2. How can a composer's use of meter distinguish his/her works from other composers?
  3. How can the use of varied meter alter the function of the music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various genres reflect varied meter signatures.
  2. Digital sequencing software can assist one to hear the effects of using different rhythms.
  3. Meter signature changes vary in historical, American, and other cultural music.
  4. Development of criteria to critique music based on use of varied meter signatures builds critical thinking and reasoning skills that can be transferred to critique processes in other disciplines and vocations.

Nature Of:

  1. Rhythm communicates an idea, emotion, or mood.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notatation of level 1 compositions using the appropriate clef for instrument and/or voice

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify notes in the alto, bass, or treble clef two to three ledger lines above or below the staff (DOK 1)
  2. Notate and transfer chord progression of I, IV, V in a given key signature (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why might it be important to know and understand different clefs?
  2. How can knowing the notes above and below the staff increase musicianship skills?
  3. How can the use of musical elements affect formal structure?
  4. What determines the levels of difficulty in a composition?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the use of notes and clefs allows one to read increasingly difficult levels of music.
  2. Notation software assists in isolating segments of music that highlight components of more advanced compositions.
  3. Form in music has a correlation to form in other disciplines (visual art, mathematics, and dance).
  4. Understanding of the relevance of music notation in historical contexts provides background and appreciation for current notation practices.

Nature Of:

  1. Notation is the language of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analysis of musical elements of a simple level 1 composition or performance

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, using a minimum of three markings (articulation, dynamic and tempo), when analyzing a musical example (DOK 1-2)
  2. Given prescribed criteria, identify the form of a composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do musical elements form the structure of a music composition?
  2. Why is it important to analyze compositions based on the use of musical elements?
  3. How does the scientific principles of acoustics relate to music

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to read various articulation symbols allows students to understand a musical idea.
  2. Music elements are found in other arts and disciplines (such as dynamics and tempo in dance; dynamics and tempo in debate, speech, or a theatrical performance).
  3. Digital software can be used to understand how music elements affect wave forms.

Nature Of:

  1. Combinations of musical elements create unique forms.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identification of rhythmic and melodic patterns in musical examples

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and demonstrate rhythms within musical examples that incorporate eighth notes and corresponding rests in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 meter signatures (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate alteration of written rhythms within musical examples, using pp/ff, largo/allegro, legato/staccato and application of accents as found in a beginning level composition (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to sing/play correct rhythms?
  2. How do meter changes shape a song?
  3. Why create a rhythmic listening map?
  4. Why are notation and sequencing software products important to composers?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Rhythmic characteristics are distinguishable when comparing historical, American, and cultural music.
  2. Rhythmic listening maps provide guidance in music as timelines in the study of history.
  3. Mass media video and audio clips demonstrate the use of dynamics to market a product.

Nature Of:

  1. Rhythmic and melodic patterns are distinguishable characteristics of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Notation of level .5 compositions using appropriate clef for instrument and/or voice

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and transcribe or demonstrate notes in alto, bass, or treble clefs in appropriate instrumental and vocal settings; can also include guitar tabulature identification (DOK 1-2)
  2. Notate a major scale and its relative minor (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to understand musical notation?
  2. How does understanding musical modality improve your musical skills?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding the elements of music will increase a musician's ability to participate in and perform original compositions.
  2. Using available music technology can increase one's musical fluency and understanding.
  3. Knowing how other disciplines use form increases a musician's understanding of how form is used in music.
  4. Identifying the relationship of major scales and their relative minor scales gives insights to the mathematical correlation used in scale construction.

Nature Of:

  1. Major and minor scales serve as building blocks of music and are used in a variety of ways and settings.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analysis of a beginning level composition or performance using musical elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe, using a minimum of two markings (dynamic and tempo) when analyzing a musical example (DOK 1-2)
  2. Analyze articulation, dynamics and tempo during performances (DOK 1-3)
  3. Using current classroom repertoire, identify I, IV, V chords (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to know musical symbols and terms?
  2. How do musical symbols help one analyze a performance or develop as a musician?
  3. Why is it important to know how musical symbols and terms are used?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Making informed choices in music reflects personal involvement in the process, which strengthens self-direction and personal decision making.
  2. The skills needed in identification of musical symbols parallel the skills used in identification of literary symbols, historical symbols, and symbols/logos used in society.

Nature Of:

  1. Understanding musical elements creates a more informed listener.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analyze and apply dynamics, tempo, meter, and articulation using appropriate music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply vocabulary for largo, moderato, diminuendo, and slur when describing music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate largo, moderato, diminuendo, and slur using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Do tempo and mood have a close connection?
  2. How does mass media rely on tempo or dynamics to send a message?
  3. Should composers give precise expressive elements within their compositions or leave expression decisions up to the performer? Give a rationale.

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identification of similarities and differences in expressive elements of music from various cultures, historical eras, genres, and styles gives insight to discerning the fundamental characteristics of each.
  2. The ability to interpret tempo markings in music can be compared to the use of adverbs in literature.
  3. Ways instruments produce changes in dynamics can be explained through the physics of sound production.
  4. Using music software to isolate and apply largo, moderato, diminuendo, and slur within compositions demonstrates the importance of these elements.

Nature Of:

  1. Expressive elements enhance musical performance.
  2. The flow of music in time relies on meter and tempo.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Analyze, aurally and visually, notation and form in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Visually identify line and space notes and notate pitches on the bass clef staff (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify 12-bar blues form (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes a composition interesting?
  2. How does the ability to identify notes improve musical ability?
  3. What significance does the blues form play in American history?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Articulating forms in music gives insight to how they are evident in dance and visual arts.
  2. Comparing the differences of use of the terms line and space in music versus art, dance, or theatre gives a contextual basis for how many art forms interpret these elements.
  3. Using music software to create variations of the blues form allows listeners to aurally discern the distinct blues sound and the derivatives of contemporary music that use this form.

Nature Of:

  1. Notation is the language of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analyze more complex instrumental and vocal examples

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally and visually identify various world instruments (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify soprano, alto, tenor, and bass voices (DOK 1)
  3. Aurally identify music from various historical periods and cultures (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument have its own timbre?
  2. How have historical events influenced musical styles?
  3. What makes a particular composition more complex than another?
  4. How is music symmetrical?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Describing ways in which music reflects a composer's emotions, ideas, imagination, and cultural context connects how music can be an extension of someone's own emotions, ideas, imagination, and cultural context.
  2. Using technology and mass media clips to identify more complex instrumental and vocal examples allow novice performers or listeners to experience a multitude of musical variations.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Comprehension and application of melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and notate, using sixteenth/sixteenth-eighth, eighth-sixteenth/sixteenth, eighth-quarter-eighth notes and ties (DOK 1-2)
  2. Notate eight-beat rhythmic patterns and four-beat melodic patterns dictated by the teacher (DOK 1-3)
  3. Aurally and visually identify I, IV, V chords in the keys of C, F, and G (DOK 1-3)
  4. Identify the position of whole and half steps in a major scale (DOK 1)
  5. Identify and demonstrate the use of accidentals (sharp, flat, and natural signs) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will identifying melodic and rhythmic patterns improve knowledge and performance skills?
  2. What does harmony add to music?
  3. How does syncopation affect the feel of music?
  4. How are ratios and intervals related?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Recognizing the patterns that occur in music provides discernment skills that can be applied to other disciplines.
  2. Music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles can be used to aurally and visually identify I, IV, V chords in C, F, and G keys.
  3. Music software can aid in identification of the components of a major scale and use of accidentals.
  4. Knowing how an instrument gets out of tune can be explained using scientific principles.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence occurring in discernable patterns.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Application and demonstration of the use of more advanced dynamics, tempo, meter and articulation using appropriate music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply vocabulary for mezzo-piano/mezzo-forte, andante, presto, and accelerando/ritardando in describing musical examples (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate mezzo-piano/mezzo-forte, andante, presto, and accelerando/ritardando using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the function of the top and bottom numbers of a time signature in duple and triple meter (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When people listen to a piece of music, what are they listening for?
  2. Why are musical opposites important?
  3. Why do composers usually use a combination of dynamics in a piece of music instead of using just one?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identification of similarities and differences in ways mezzo piano/mezzo forte, andante/presto, and accelerando/ritardando are used in various cultures, historical pieces, genres, and styles allows a novice listener to build musical literacy.
  2. Understanding that most musical terms are Italian builds context for the source of contemporary, western music terminology.
  3. Musical vocabulary has a strong correlation to adverbs in literature. The ability to explain how duple and triple meters compare to the base ten mathematics pattern gives insight to the mathematical nature of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music uses specific vocabulary and expressive elements.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Identification of aural and visual notations of basic musical forms

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally identify theme and Variations form (DOK 1-2)
  2. Aurally identify interlude (DOK 1-2)
  3. Visually identify and apply D.C. al Fine, D.S. al Coda (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do composers rely on theme?
  2. What is the purpose of a theme or variation?
  3. Why are interludes important?
  4. What part of a song is usually the most catchy or most important?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles have specific and identifiable themes and variations.
  2. Mass media uses identifiable themes and variations when determining theme songs for commercials, television shows, etc.
  3. Theme and variation are used throughout the arts and among many disciplines and vocations (such as visual art, dance, literature, interior design).

Nature Of:

  1. Musical compositions have a specific structure that is defined by the use of elements.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Analyze vocal and instrumental examples

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally and visually identify specific instruments of the band and orchestra (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify music performed in two or more parts (DOK 1-2)
  3. Aurally identify music from various periods in history (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument have its own timbre?
  2. How have historical events influenced musical styles?
  3. How has the impact of technology and mass media affected band and orchestral music?
  4. How do different styles of music affect audience response?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Choices made in instrumentation reflect the composer's emotions, ideas, imagination, and cultural context.
  2. Video and audio clips assist in isolating instruments in a band or orchestra to identify the instrument's unique sound.
  3. Marketing companies make choices on music to use in marketing campaigns based on instrumentations that would appeal to their target audience. (Orchestral instrumentation sends a message of high quality, jazz instrumentation sends a sultry or moody message, and popular music appeals to a youthful audience.)

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Identify and aurally recognize melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and use do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, high do, low sol, and low la pitches (diatonic scale) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and use dotted quarter-eighth and triplet notes (DOK 1-2)
  3. Notate four-beat rhythmic patterns and four-beat melodic patterns dictated by the teacher (DOK 1-3)
  4. Aurally recognize IV chord in a I-IV-V pattern (DOK 1-3)
  5. Aurally distinguish between major and minor tonalities (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will identifying melodic and rhythmic patterns improve individual and ensemble performance?
  2. What does harmony add to music?
  3. How does tonality affect the feeling of a piece of music?
  4. Why would a composer use both major and minor tonalities in a composition?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Four-beat musical patterns gives insight to poetry patterns in literature, simple contemporary songs, and nursery rhymes.
  2. Music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles can be compared based on the use of diatonic scale and four-beat rhythmic patterns.
  3. Mass media predominantly employs diatonic scales and four-beat rhythmic and melodic components because they are easily recognizable.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence occurring in discernable patterns.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Apply and demonstrate use of basic dynamics, tempo, meter, and articulation using appropriate music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply vocabulary for pianissimo/fortissimo, largo/allegro, and legato/staccato when describing musical examples (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate pianissimo/fortissimo, largo/allegro, and legato/staccato using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Explain the function of the top number of a time signature involving two, three, and four beats. (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do changes in tempo, dynamics, and articulation affect the mood of music?
  2. When people listen to a piece of music, what are they listening for?
  3. How much freedom should conductors have when presenting a musical work?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Mass media employs varying uses of dynamics, tempo, meter, and articulation when the goal is to draw attention to something.
  2. Electronic keyboards are tools to demonstrate dynamics and articulation and provide rhythm styles that are in duple or triple meter.
  3. Articulation in music mirrors the skill for articulation in speech and theatre productions and requires precise diction and clarity.

Nature Of:

  1. Expressive elements enhance musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Analyze simple notational elements and form in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Visually identify line and space notes and notate pitches on the treble clef staff (DOK 1)
  2. Aurally identify question-and-answer phrases (DOK 1)
  3. Aurally identify rondo form (DOK 1-2)
  4. Accurately interpret first and second endings (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes a composition interesting?
  2. How will being able to identify notational elements help in music-making?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various musical styles easily recognizable in society (such as marches, lullabies, holiday music) use simple notational elements and form.
  2. American folk music and music of other cultures employ simple notational elements and form because they were shared in the aural tradition and needed to be easily remembered.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical compositions have a specific structure that is defined by the use of elements.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify families of instruments visually and aurally (DOK 1)
  2. Differentiate male and female voices in choral settings (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why does each voice and instrument sound different?
  2. Why do others have different music preferences?
  3. How is music used in community events and celebrations?
  4. How do different styles of music affect audience response?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology and mass media provide global examples of families of instruments and varying vocal and instrumental tone colors.
  2. Musicians and composers rely on varying tone colors to provide rich, layered effects for the listener.
  3. Similarities and differences can be identified between the use of color in visual arts and music.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Identify and aurally recognize simple melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and demonstrate do, re, mi, sol, la, high do, low sol, and low la pitches (extended pentatonic scale) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and notate using sixteenth and dotted half notes (DOK 1-2)
  3. Aurally and visually recognize I-V chords (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does identifying melodic and rhythmic patterns improve performance skills?
  2. What does harmony add to music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to recognize the patterns that occur in music relates to the patterns that can be found in many disciplines and vocations (such as mathematics, history, visual art and design, architecture, science).
  2. Music from various cultures is identified through its unique and specific melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns
  3. Mass media chooses examples of music from various genres and styles to achieve desired melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic patterns.
  4. There are definite mathematical components of 16th notes and dotted half notes that represent a fundamental understanding of fractions.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence.
  2. Patterns occur in music and in the world.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension and use of appropriate music vocabulary for dynamics, tempo, meter and articulation

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use vocabulary for piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected when describing music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)
  3. Demonstrate accent, duple/triple meter, and fermata using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes music interesting to listen to?
  2. Why are there changes in tempo and dynamics in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Music from various cultures use changes in piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected to convey a message.
  2. Music from various historical periods, genres, and styles use examples of piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected.
  3. Music from various mass media use changes in piano/forte, crescendo/decrescendo, and smooth/connected to convey a desired message. (Relaxation is identified with a soft, smooth musical line; excitement is identified with a loud, accented musical line.)

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehend beginning notational elements and form in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally identify ABA form and verse/refrain (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify notated examples of bar lines, double bar lines, and measures (DOK 1)
  3. Aurally identify coda (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes a composition interesting?
  2. How will being able to identify notational elements help in music?
  3. How do patterns in math help with patterns in music?
  4. How do bar lines in music compare to punctuation in writing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various musical styles (American folk music, marches, lullabies, holidays) use verse and refrain.
  2. Examples of the ABA and verse and refrain patterns can be found in other disciplines (visual art and design, dance, theatre, poetry).
  3. Identification of the differences and similarities between the alphabet and the musical alphabet provides insight to the understanding that music notation is a distinct language.

Nature Of:

  1. Most musical compositions have a specific structure.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Comprehension of vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify vocal sound groupings (high voices, low voices) (DOK 1)
  2. Identify instrumental sound groupings (woodwinds, percussion, strings) (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do voices and instruments sound different?
  2. Why do others have different music preferences?
  3. How is music used in community events and celebrations?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Recognizing how the vibration of strings, drum heads, or air columns generates sounds provides insight to how sounds in the world are made.
  2. Video clip examples of how tone color is associated with characters in movies, cartoons, etc., help to illustrate what is meant by tone color.
  3. Electronic keyboards contain features that isolate differences in timbres and timbral groupings to provide examples of each for the listener.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Comprehension of beginning melodic and rhythmic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and use step/skip/repeat, do, re, mi, sol, la pitches (pentatonic scale) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify and notate, using half notes, whole notes, half rests and whole rests (DOK 1-2)
  3. Visually identify a chord (space-space-space or line-line-line) (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will knowing notes and rests help me in performing music?
  2. How will echoing melodic patterns help me understand a song?
  3. How is the step/skip/repeat skill a math problem?
  4. How is a pentatonic scale like counting by 5s?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to recognize the patterns that occur in music relates to the patterns that can be found in many disciplines and vocations (mathematics, history, visual art and design, architecture, science).
  2. Musical themes/patterns/textures can be compared to the use of these elements in stories, songs, and other art forms.
  3. Mathematical counting equivalents can be applied to half notes, half rests, whole notes, and whole rests.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence.
  2. Patterns occur in music and in the world.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension of gradual changes in dynamics and tempo

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use vocabulary for getting louder/softer and getting faster/slower (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate getting louder/softer and getting faster/slower using movement, voice, and instruments (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes music interesting to listen to?
  2. Why are there changes in tempo and dynamics in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Explaining the difference between making music louder or softer with a volume controller versus how music is performed provides the understanding that dynamics changes involve changes in intensity and character, not just a change in decibels.
  2. Using video and audio clips to identify the louder and softer parts of music illustrates the large variety of ways these elements are used in music.

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Aurally identify simple components of musical form

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally identify introduction (DOK 1-2)
  2. Aurally identify phrase (DOK 1-2)
  3. Aurally and visually identify AB form (DOK 1-2)
  4. Visually identify staff and repeat signs (DOK 1)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What makes music interesting to listen to?
  2. How will being able to identify notational elements help in music-making?
  3. How are musical phrases and sentences similar or different?
  4. Why is using a repeat important when you can just copy the same section out?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various musical styles (American folk music, marches, lullabies, holidays) use an AB pattern and/or introduction or phrases.
  2. Describing other disciplines that could have an AB patterns provides a connection to what a pattern is, how it in constructed, and where it can be found.

Nature Of:

  1. Most musical compositions have a specific structure.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Comprehension of basic vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify pitched and non-pitched classroom instruments using sight and sound (DOK 1)
  2. Identify and demonstrate singing, speaking, whispering, and shouting voices (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do instruments sound different?
  2. Why do others have different music preferences?
  3. How is music used in community events and celebrations?
  4. How does music make you feel different?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Technology and mass media provide global examples of families of instruments and varying vocal and instrumental tone colors.
  2. Musicians and composers rely on varying tone colors to provide rich, layered effects for the listener.
  3. Similarities and differences can be identified between the use of color in visual arts and tone color and texture in music.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Comprehension of basic rhythmic and melodic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate steady beat, strong/weak beat, difference between beat, and rhythm (DOK 1-2)
  2. Aurally recognize and demonstrate going up/going down, and sol-mi-la (or mi-re-do) pitches (DOK 1-2)
  3. Identify and notate using quarter notes, eighth notes and quarter rests (DOK 1-2)
  4. Discriminate between same/different rhythmic and melodic patterns (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to keep a steady beat?
  2. How will identifying notes and rests help me in performing music?
  3. How will echoing different pitches help in understanding a song?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to recognize the patterns that occur in music relates to the patterns that can be found in many disciplines and vocations (mathematics, history, visual art and design, architecture, science).
  2. Musical themes, patterns, and textures can be compared to the use of these elements in stories, songs, and other art forms.
  3. Mathematical counting equivalents can be applied to quarter notes, eighth notes, and quarter rests.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence.
  2. Patterns occur in music and in the world.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Comprehension of musical opposites

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use their own vocabulary to describe musical opposites (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate loud/soft, fast/slow, high/low, sound/silence, and beat/no beat (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do opposites make music more interesting to listen to?
  2. What other opposites can be found in other disciplines?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identifying musical opposites in various historical periods, cultural styles, and genres of music and mass media strengthens one's ability to comprehend the range of the continuum of musical opposites in specific areas.
  2. Demonstrating musical opposites through movement helps to assess one's understanding of what an opposite is kinesthetically.
  3. Demonstrating opposites aurally and kinesthetically builds long-term memory and connections to literary and societal opposites.

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.
  2. Specific vocabulary is necessary to describe music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehension of basic elements of musical form

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Aurally identify same/different patterns and phrases (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use body movement to interpret musical phrases (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. In what ways will a person's hearing help when listening to a song?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Various musical styles (American folk music, marches, lullabies) can be used to provide examples of same and different phrases.
  2. The ability to hear same and different phrases is a foundational skill to developing aural discrimination in musical works.

Nature Of:

  1. Most musical compositions have a specific structure.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify different vocal and instrumental tone colors

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify male/female voices (DOK 1)
  2. Describe vocal and instrumental sounds using personal vocabulary (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do voices and instruments sound different?
  2. What are differences and similarities between two sounds?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using music from various cultures, historical periods, genres, and styles to hear male/female voices and varying vocal and instrumental sound provides a global context for the ways music is used.
  2. Using examples such as cartoons, computer games, community, and home events to identify male/female voices and varying instrumental sounds provides a connection to the real ways music is used in the community.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Identify simple rhythmic patterns

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Move to demonstrate steady beat (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify short/long and strong/weak beats (DOK 1-2)
  3. Use icons or invented symbols to represent beat (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to keep a steady beat?
  2. How is a steady beat or pulse used in music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Recognizing that patterns occur in music and other subjects is preliminary to pattern identification, pattern matching, and understanding the function of patterns.
  2. Identifying similar themes, patterns, and textures in stories, songs, and art forms provides practice and exploration in how themes/patterns and textures are used in the world.

Nature Of:

  1. Music notation is a visual representation of organized sound and silence.
  2. Patterns occur in music and in the world.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 3. Theory of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Describe and respond to musical elements

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use an individual vocabulary to describe music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use body movement to respond to dynamics and tempo (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does music make you feel?
  2. What elements of a piece of music contribute to changes in mood?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to identify dynamics and tempo changes are the beginning foundational skills to understanding the elements in music.
  2. Describing what one hears when listening to diverse samples of music builds a foundational skill of responding verbally to a musical feeling.

Nature Of:

  1. The application of expressive elements enhances musical performance.
  2. Specific vocabulary is necessary to describe music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Recognition of a wide variety of sounds and sound sources

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use personal vocabulary to describe sources of sound (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use invented symbols to represent musical sounds and ideas (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do instruments and voices sound different?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Exploration of what kind of sound comes from what sources builds a foundational understanding of the relationship between the nature of sources and the product that results.
  2. Allowing the use of invented symbols to represent sounds gives developmentally appropriate, preparatory practice to understanding the structure of musical notation.

Nature Of:

  1. Unique tone qualities are found in varying styles and genres of music.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Performance Pathway
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Practice of appropriate behavior in cultural activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate respect for the music preferences of others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Articulate and demonstrate appropriate audience behavior in various kinds of musical performance and music-related events (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the importance of performing music from different historical periods, cultures, and traditions?
  2. How does gaining and applying knowledge of appropriate behavior as an audience member enhance the concert experience for an individual and for others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically significant events impact music during the time period and future.
  2. Understanding music of different cultures helps people understand the culture as a whole.
  3. Understanding that technology may or may not be used in different cultural contexts gives insight to a culture's belief in the function of music and the quality of a natural versus technologically enhanced performance.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical activities pertinent to a given culture are illustrative of the people of that culture.
  2. Giving attention to and demonstrating respect for those musical activities promote understanding between individuals and ethnicities.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Evaluation of the quality and effectiveness of musical performances

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply specific criteria from similar or exemplary models in evaluating music by others or themselves (DOK 1-4)
  2. Read and understand professional critiques of musical works and performances (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will evaluating performances help someone become a better musician?
  2. What qualifies a specific performance as exemplary?
  3. What makes one performance effective over another?
  4. What is the relationship between musical criticism and composers/performers?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Using audio or video recordings to critique a musical performance and compare it with an existing professional review of the same performance builds understanding of artistic license and exemplary components of a performance.
  2. Reviewing individual progress in the preparation of a performance selection over the full course of the rehearsal cycle, using digital recording technology to make periodic recordings, and making reflective written review of each recording toward improvement of performance reinforce the cyclical nature of critique and evaluation.
  3. Participating in musical assessment exchanges, in which individuals partner with others to exchange reviews of music works in progress, to improve performance provides development of interpersonal skills required to make and accept criticism effectively.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical performance skills are improved through the ability to critically evaluate performances.
  2. Performing musicians progress and improve through reflective review.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Development of criteria-based aesthetic judgment of the artistic process and products in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop criteria for making informed aesthetic (personal) judgments about music (DOK 1-3)
  2. Make and defend informed aesthetic (personal) judgments based on the criteria developed (DOK 1-4)
  3. Discuss, with some understanding, the ideas of aesthetic qualities and aesthetic appreciation (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to cite specific musical details when making judgments about a piece of music?
  2. What kind of personal viewpoints or concerns might prevent an objective aesthetic evaluation of a musical work or performance?
  3. Art philosophers argue the difference between the qualities and value of original works of visual art and forgeries or the same works. What issues might be similar in music?
  4. Is all music (and art) beautiful?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to aesthetically critique music provides a more in-depth understanding of cultural traditions and exemplary works.
  2. Reviewing and discussing the ideas that early philosophers like Plato and Aristotle had about the aesthetics of music provide historical and philosophical perspectives on the aesthetics of music.
  3. Exploring the place of process, product, and aesthetic content in music creation and performance enhances people's understanding of the meaning of music and its relationship to meaning in life.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians possess the ability to develop and defend opinions about personal musical choices because it is essential to success in musical careers.
  2. While many of the basic arguments about the nature of art and beauty began many centuries ago and are still unresolved, it still expands people's understanding of music and the arts to think about these issues.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Knowledge of available musical opportunities for continued musical growth and professional development

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Articulate pathways to further musical education including but not limited to higher education, music production, music business, song-writing, community institutions, music-making with others (interpersonal/friends), personal music-making, and music in everyday life (DOK 1-2)
  2. Articulate career pathways that encourage musical and artistic qualities for success (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When looking at the community, how, when, and why is music used?
  2. How does pirating music affect composers' lives?
  3. What kinds of opportunities are available for amateur music-making in American community life?
  4. What kinds of people are involved in various kinds of community music efforts?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Knowing how music affects human emotion, people can program appropriate musical genres for appropriate settings.
  2. Understanding how composers earn money for their compositions leads to respect for copyright laws
  3. Examining the music industry and career pathways that support music performance, music media, and education provides an understanding of the variety of career opportunities available through music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music can provide lifelong learning experiences, enriching lives as an avocation.
  2. Music offers many nonperformance and non-instructional careers.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: High School - Generalist Pathway
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Practice of appropriate behavior during cultural activities

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate respect for the music preferences of others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior in various kinds of musical performance and music-related events (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important for people to recognize differences between music of various cultures?
  2. How does gaining and applying knowledge of appropriate behavior as an audience member enhance the concert experience for an individual and for others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Historically significant events impact music and influence future musical events.
  2. Understanding music of different cultures helps people understand the culture as a whole.
  3. Comparing appropriate behavioral expectations for music events in various kinds of music genres and social and cultural situations creates a musically literate audience.

Nature Of:

  1. The universal nature of music encourages respect for and brings to light commonalities between various cultures.
  2. Music of the past provides insights into the events, people, and circumstances responsible for shaping history.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Knowledge of available musical opportunities for continued musical growth and professional development

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Articulate pathways to further musical education including but not limited to higher education, music production, music business, song-writing, community institutions, music-making with others (interpersonal/friends), personal music-making, and music in everyday life (DOK 1-2)
  2. Articulate career pathways that encourage musical and artistic qualities for success (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When looking at the community, how, when, and why is music used?
  2. What kinds of opportunities are available for amateur music-making in American community life?
  3. What kinds of people are involved in various kinds of community music efforts?
  4. How does pirating music affect composers' lives?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Knowing how music affects human emotion, people can program appropriate musical genres for appropriate settings.
  2. Understanding how composers earn money for their compositions leads to respect for copyright laws.
  3. Examining the music industry and career pathways that support music performance, music media, and education provides an understanding of the variety of career opportunities available through music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music can provide lifelong learning experiences, enriching lives as an avocation.
  2. Music offers many nonperformance and non-instructional careers.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Development of criteria-based aesthetic judgment of the artistic process and products in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop criteria for making informed aesthetic (personal) judgments about music (DOK 1-3)
  2. Make and defend informed aesthetic (personal) judgments based on the criteria developed (DOK 1-4)
  3. Discuss, with some basic understanding, the ideas of aesthetic qualities and aesthetic appreciation (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it important to cite specific musical details when making judgments about a piece of music?
  2. How can using specific criteria when making music choices improve the listening experience?
  3. How has music impacted the course of events in history?
  4. What are the criteria for qualifying as a work of musical art?
  5. What elements of visual art might be correlated to musical qualities of form, texture, voicing/instrumentation, emotional intensity, and mode?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Informed judgments of music preserve cultural tradition and exemplary works.
  2. Discussing and thinking about the concepts of beauty in the object versus beauty in the eye of the beholder leads to a basic understanding of the meaning of aesthetics.
  3. Attending a live performance and comparing it with a recorded version of the performance provide an understanding of the differences in musical elements between a digitized musical experience and a live musical experience.

Nature Of:

  1. Musicians possess the ability to develop and defend opinions about personal musical choices because it is essential to success in musical careers.
  2. While many of the basic arguments about the nature of art and beauty began many centuries ago and are still unresolved, it still expands people's understanding of music and the arts to think about these issues.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

4. Informed judgments through participation, performance, and the creative process

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate an awareness of artistic choices involved in the musical process (DOK 1-3)
  2. Use specific criteria when judging the relative quality of musical performances (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe characteristics that make a composition or performance a work of art (DOK 1-3)
  4. Make and articulate evaluations and aesthetic judgments of musical works and performances in the basic language of music criticism (DOK 1-4)
  5. Combine evaluation and personal preference in making informed individual choices about music selection and participation (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What specific criteria are evaluated when judging a musical performance?
  2. What makes one performance of better quality than another?
  3. What would be the impact on music if judgments were not made?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Researching musical selections that have been identified as works of art provides insight to long-term selection criteria and the impact of societal norms.
  2. Examining a work that has been identified as significant in any genre will provide ways to describe the characteristics that contribute to its significance.
  3. The entertainment industry creates musical talent shows, music-based television shows, and broadcasts of performances based on select criteria that rely on broad-based audience appeal to improve viewership ratings, which can convey a narrow view of a society's musical culture.

Nature Of:

  1. Increased understanding of what constitutes artistic merit as well as characteristics of quality in music provide for better choices as a performer and consumer.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Eighth Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Evaluation of musical performances and compositions using advanced criteria

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop and describe informed criteria for evaluating musical performances and compositions (DOK 1-3)
  2. Evaluate works from personal listening repertoire with an advanced vocabulary (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How will evaluating performances help someone become a better musician?
  2. How does evaluative listening affect ed your listening skills and preferences?
  3. Which general criteria might be applied to music from all cultures and genre?
  4. What qualifies a specific performance as exemplary?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The use of predesigned rubrics or rating scales helps to evaluate a musical performance by an individual or group and provides rationale for determining the strengths and weaknesses of a performance.
  2. The ability to choose appropriate literature for an individual or group enhances the rehearsal and performance experience.
  3. Using appropriate musical vocabulary to describe a personal listening preference enhances a person's ability to communicate using a common language.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to critically evaluate performances provides necessary information essential to improving performance skills.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Articulation of music's role and cultural tradition in American history and society

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe various ways music is used and enjoyed in different societal backgrounds and cultural traditions (DOK 1-2)
  2. Create and defend a personal listening repertoire representing various styles and cultures from a span of musical eras and time periods (DOK 1-4)
  3. Discuss the instrumental composition of various kinds of American musical ensembles and their functions within the ensembles (DOK 1-2)
  4. Discuss the vocal composition of various kinds of American musical ensembles and the function of the voices within the ensembles (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How is music an integral aspect of various cultural activities and traditions?
  2. How are personal listening choices strong indicators of cultural and ethnic backgrounds?
  3. What happens to popular music over time?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The Internet is a valuable resource in investigating the functions of music and commonalities in those functions in various cultures.
  2. The music of today's American culture compared to that of past cultural traditions shows how technology may or may not have been a factor.
  3. Discussion of popular music with people from a previous generation gives firsthand understanding of what their music meant to them, and reciprocal understanding by articulating similarities and differences of what music means to the current generation.
  4. Audio or video recordings of performance or live performances are equally valuable in observing and discussing the use of voices and instruments and their functions within the ensemble in such varied genre as bluegrass, rock, jazz, mariachi, rap, church, and culturally specific music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music is a reflection of the culture, traditions, and circumstances in which it is produced.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Seventh Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Analysis, through compare and contrast, of music performances and compositions according to detailed criteria, utilizing an informed music vocabulary

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Apply prescribed criteria for evaluating musical performances and compositions (DOK 1-4)
  2. Compare two performances of the same work and discuss the comparison (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are music and literature linked in history?
  2. How are personal choices in music enhanced by an informed depth of knowledge?
  3. What makes one performance more effective than another?
  4. What kinds of changes to original works or performances do arrangers and performers apply?

Relevance & Application:

  1. An arrangement or "cover" version of the same work offer comparison opportunities to the contextual differences of an original musical work or original performance of that work.
  2. Mass media and the entertainment industry use "covers" of recognizable music to appeal to a larger audience.
  3. Copyright laws evolve to match technological advancements in the sharing and/or copying of digital music.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to critically evaluate performances provides necessary information essential to improving performance skills.
  2. Musical perception skills are sharpened through comparison of different versions of the same work.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Articulation and analysis of individual experiences in music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Construct a personal listening repertoire that represents various styles and cultures (DOK 1-4)
  2. Articulate personal selection criteria (DOK 1-2)
  3. Using a prescribed list of musical selections, consider and describe in what ways the selections are important (DOK 1-3)
  4. Describe customary techniques of performance on guitar common to the traditional American musical experience (DOK 1-2)
  5. Describe the use, performance techniques, and cultural significance of instruments specific to local or regional culture (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does music affect different people in different ways?
  2. Why do people make specific personal choices in music?
  3. What factors determine the importance of a piece of music, both immediately and over time?
  4. In what ways have unique and expanded techniques been applied to the use of various instruments?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Live demonstrations by musicians of differing genres offer firsthand examples of special techniques and electronic enhancement potential used respective to their instrument or voice.
  2. Live performances by musicians offer firsthand experiences demonstrating the use, techniques, and cultural significance of instruments or voice specific to a local or regional culture.
  3. Many sectors in society rely on selection of music for varying purposes to provide diverse experiences (such as opening ceremonies, jingles for products, patriotic events, weddings, funerals).

Nature Of:

  1. Music has numerous uses, all of which reflect some aspect of the human experience.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Sixth Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Determination of strengths and weaknesses in musical performances according to specific criteria

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify criteria used in evaluating various kinds of musical performances (DOK 1-2)
  2. Employ basic specific music terminology related to elements of performance and evaluation to discuss a music performance (DOK 1-4)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What criteria are important in evaluating a performance?
  2. How are these criteria applied to the listening experience?
  3. How does the quality of a live performance differ from that of a recording?
  4. Has the use of technology improved the quality of musical performance?
  5. How has recorded music affected people's expectations of quality?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Advancements in technology have changed the availability and accessibility of music.
  2. Current trends in musical styles and the role of technology in each offer opportunities to explore their connections.
  3. A personal set of criteria for evaluating the quality of musical performances in the music that someone listens to helps to objectify preferences, a skill that is transferable to other disciplines and life pursuits.
  4. Recording technology has altered the public perception of quality.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical performances, whether live or recorded, may be qualitatively evaluated according to established criteria.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Description of music's role in the human experience and ways music is used and enjoyed in society

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Relate and discuss how various aesthetic qualities communicate images, feelings, or emotions in specific musical works (DOK 1-4)
  2. Discuss potential influence of music on emotions and behavior (DOK 1-3)
  3. Categorize a listening library of music literature and repertoire that represents various styles and cultures from a span of musical eras (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are ways music is used in the rituals of society?
  2. In what situations is enjoyment a secondary purpose?
  3. Can music convey a positive or negative message?
  4. Can music be a positive or negative influence on human behavior?

Relevance & Application:

  1. An informal survey of personal listening preferences defines listening habits.
  2. The impact of movie soundtracks is evident through emotional connections made through the music.
  3. The popularity of music is apparent through the investigation of various websites for most popular or most downloaded pieces of music.
  4. Commercials and other interests use the effects of music on people to sell products or convey messages.
  5. The Internet offers opportunities to investigate instances of behavior affected by music.

Nature Of:

  1. Articulating choices for personal repertoire from informed musical criteria promotes more informed consumers.
  2. Music forms links in people's memories to the situations in which it was originally perceived or associated.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fifth Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Explain and defend personal preferences for specific music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Develop and apply appropriate musical and nonmusical criteria to support personal preferences for specific musical styles and works (DOK 1-4)
  2. Discuss the difference between preference for and quality of musical works (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Does an individual preference for a musical work or performance make it good or bad?
  2. What is the correlation between liking a work and the importance of a work?
  3. Why are many classical works, jazz works and performances, and Broadway songs considered to be exceptional examples of American and Western music even though they do not share the popularity of contemporary "top 40" or other contemporary styles?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Developing a series of questions regarding musical preferences allows individuals to discern why they prefer certain styles of music and test their effectiveness.
  2. Surveying the listening preferences of consumers provide a basis of musical and nonmusical information, and the use of music terminology in a local community.
  3. Comparing musical works that are specific to a given culture provides insight into the evaluation of musical elements and extra-musical aspects used within a culture.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical preferences are developed through individual experiences and are also subject to personality traits.
  2. A broad musical experience and comprehensive music vocabulary strengthen one's ability to objectively consider and articulate ideas about music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Articulate the meaning in music according to elements, aesthetic qualities, and human responses

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify and analyze differences in tempo and dynamics in contrasting music selections (DOK 1-3)
  2. Explain how people in a particular culture use and respond to specific musical works from that culture (DOK 1-3)
  3. Describe the means used to describe images or evoke feelings and emotions in musical works from various cultures (DOK 1-3)
  4. Discuss criteria used to make evaluations of musical works and performances (DOK 1-3)
  5. Discuss elements of performance in observational and evaluative way, using appropriate music terminology (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What role does music play in various cultures?
  2. How does music affect emotions and feelings in general?
  3. How do the elements of music affect the way music is classified into various styles?
  4. In what general ways do people evaluate music works and performances?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The number of radio stations in an area broadcasting a particular style of music can give insight to the demographic information of the area and its musical preferences.
  2. Identifying musical works that are specific to a given culture in comparison to those of another builds a fundamental respect for the differences of others.

Nature Of:

  1. Music is an art that expresses general thoughts and feelings; various musical examples will evoke varying general individual responses.
  2. The success of a musical work or performance can be evaluated according to its effectiveness in its formal properties, content, and context.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Fourth Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Explain personal preferences for specific music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use appropriate music terminology to explain preferences (DOK 1-3)
  2. Describe and demonstrate characteristics of effective personal participation in ensembles (DOK 1-2)
  3. Discriminate between musical and nonmusical factors in individual music preference (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it beneficial to experience a wide variety of musical styles as a listener and a performer?
  2. Why is it important to have a variety and diversity of musical styles available to society?
  3. How are preferences better communicated when appropriate music terminology is used?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Collaboration in determining musical preferences highlights the similarities and differences among people with individual musical tastes.
  2. Ensemble participation develops collaboration and self-direction skills through the demands of discrimination of sound and pitch, following conductor's cues and listening and adjusting to others.

Nature Of:

  1. Experiences with a variety of musical styles develop an expanded range of personal preferences.
  2. Music preferences are sometimes affected by nonmusical but significant factors such as the social meaning of a work at a particular time or for a particular purpose.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehend and respect the musical values of others considering cultural context as an element of musical evaluation and meaning

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Demonstrate respect for diverse local and regional opinions regarding music preferences (DOK 1-2)
  2. Identify prominent Colorado styles and musicians (DOK 1)
  3. Compare differences in sources of meaning and standards of evaluation within the contexts of local and regional musical styles (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What historical factors contributed to the development of a "western" style of American music?
  2. Who are important past and present musicians of Colorado?
  3. Where in Colorado are particular styles of music most prevalent?
  4. Is any one kind of music better than any another?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Examining and listening to music that is unique to Colorado gives historical context to how culture in Colorado evolved and was reinforced by the music predominantly performed, and provides a comparison to other states in the West.
  2. The Internet can be used to investigate the active presence of local or regional live music, identifying musicians' websites, performance venues, and ticket availability, which provides a more direct link to local and regional music trends and influences.

Nature Of:

  1. Music represents diverse experiences, thoughts, and emotions, and is unique to each individual with regard to values and opinions.
  2. Local and regional music groups of all kinds are meaningful sources of culture.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Third Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Identify personal preferences for specific music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use simple terms to describe preferences (DOK 1-2)
  2. Demonstrate how music communicates meaning of text, feelings, personal preferences, etc. (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate respect for the music preferences and opinions of others (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do individuals prefer certain styles of music?
  2. What is the correlation between liking a work and the importance of a work?
  3. What is involved in respecting the opinions of others about music preferences?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The ability to verbalize individual preferences in music can be used to assess the success of music education in developing musically literate students.
  2. Respect for others' opinions and preferences exemplify a fundamental respect for others and provides context on how varying cultures and societies come to view the importance of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Individual experiences and personality traits play an important role in developing personal preferences for music.
  2. Experiences with a variety of musical styles can develop a broader appreciation for music and an expanded range of personal preferences.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Respond to and make informed judgments about music through participation, performance, and the creative process

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Select and use specific criteria in making judgments about the quality of a musical performance (DOK 1-3)
  2. Create developmentally appropriate movements to express pitch, tempo, form, and dynamics (DOK 2-4)
  3. Describe how specific musical elements communicate particular ideas or moods in music (DOK 1-3)
  4. Explain the function of a music synthesizer and some of its capabilities (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why is it beneficial to experience a wide variety of musical styles as a listener and a performer?
  2. Why is it important to have a variety and diversity of musical styles available to society?
  3. How can appropriate music vocabulary help in discussing musical evaluation with others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. The information literacy skills required to access and evaluate various musical performances include research, source discernment, and verification of authenticity.
  2. Assisting others in developing a wider musical vocabulary and library builds deeper conviction and rational for personal preferences.
  3. Comparing two audio or video recordings of performances of the same musical work by the same performer builds skill in articulating general perceptions in musical terms.

Nature Of:

  1. The ability to create sounds through synthesis without traditional instruments widens the possibilities for music creation and production.
  2. No two live performances are ever exactly the same, either in technical or aesthetic aspects.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Articulate music's significance within an individual musical experience

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain how music speaks to every person in unique ways (DOK 1-3)
  2. Develop and articulate an understanding of the aesthetic qualities of music performed or heard (DOK 1-4)
  3. Identify differences and commonalities in music from various cultures (DOK 1-3)
  4. Discuss reasons that different kinds of music are important to people (DOK 1-2)
  5. Explain the purpose of an amplifier, microphone, and speakers and how they work together to reinforce acoustic sounds in music performance (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What do people look for when choosing music for enjoyment?
  2. What cultural music would be considered most appealing?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Determining the sources of live music in the community creates informed consumers and gives insight into the musical preferences of a local culture.
  2. Articulating the importance of music in a family or cultural heritage creates an appreciation for how individuals contribute to local communities and influence the availability of musical experiences within the community.
  3. Understanding the use of technology in performances by local live groups or video recordings of performances provides insight into the influence of technology on the musical culture in local communities.

Nature Of:

  1. Music's place in the lives of individuals is unique because it depends on personal background, preference, and experience.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Second Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate respect for individual, group, and self-contributions in a musical setting

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize and demonstrate appropriate audience behavior in a live performance (DOK 1-2)
  2. Contribute to a group effort by of listening to and discussing music (DOK 1-3)
  3. Contribute to a group effort by of making music and reflecting on the performance (DOK 1-3)
  4. Articulate ideas about holding and respecting musical preferences (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When is it appropriate or not appropriate to talk while music is being heard?
  2. Why is it important to listen respectfully to live performances?
  3. How does an individual contribute to effective music-making?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Understanding situations where music is the focus of attention and contrasting it with situations where music is a secondary element is one example of how music is adjusted to its role in the texture of an overall project.
  2. Reactions of listeners during a presentation of live music as opposed to recorded music vary because of the societal expectations of each situation.
  3. Individuals make choices about musical preferences based on many reasons, such as family preferences, popular media, and a wide or limited exposure to diverse forms of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Music is an art that deals specifically with sound, so it is important to assist in providing an environment that is conducive to focused listening.
  2. Musical choices may be made on the basis of both musical and nonmusical criteria.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Articulate reactions to the elements and aesthetic qualities of musical performance using musical terminology and movement

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use specific music terminology in discussing individual preferences for music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Create developmentally appropriate movements to express pitch, tempo, form, and dynamics in music (DOK 2-4)
  3. Identify how musical elements communicate ideas or moods (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can movement reflect the expressive qualities of music?
  2. How does music affect emotions and feelings in general?
  3. How are passive and active listening different?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Appropriate audience behavior relies on an individual's self-direction ability, the ability to discern the role of an audience (e.g. some performances encourage audience participation, some performances require active listening), and the willingness to submit individual desires to the need for consideration of the experience of others.
  2. Audiences have varying purposes throughout society. (Athletic events encourage audience noise. Political audiences express their agreement or disagreement in various ways. Formal presentations expect restraint and applause.)
  3. A common and specific musical vocabulary is important when discussing the evaluation of music works and performances or in defending individual musical preferences.

Nature Of:

  1. Music may be experienced passively or actively as a listener.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Demonstrate increased awareness of music in daily life or special events

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Recognize and demonstrate interest in creating, performing, and moving to music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Recognize and demonstrate interest in listening to several types of music (DOK 1-2)
  3. Describe music from various cultures in general terms (DOK 1-2)
  4. Explain their own cultural and social interests in music (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How often do people listen to and move to music for enjoyment?
  2. How does a favorite song make a person feel?
  3. Why is it important to experience a variety of music from different cultures?
  4. How do individuals experience music in different ways?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Articulating uses of music in a local community, family, or culture can be done through researching societal trends and influences.
  2. The importance of music goes beyond entertainment and is used to express such things as strong emotions and celebrations, and to document important events in history.

Nature Of:

  1. Music provides societal and cultural connections that are unique to individuals.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: First Grade
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate respect for the contributions of self and others in a musical setting

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Participate appropriately in music activities that involve sharing, taking turns, and listening respectfully to the ideas of others (DOK 1-2)
  2. Reflect on the performance of others (DOK 1-3)
  3. Demonstrate audience behavior appropriate for the context and style of music performed (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When is it appropriate or not appropriate to talk during a musical performance?
  2. Why is it important to listen respectfully to live performances?
  3. How does an individual contribute to effective music-making?
  4. Why are the contributions of others important to music-making in group settings?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Discussing situations when music is the focus of attention and contrasting with those when music is a secondary element help to identify the various ways music is used.
  2. Discussing nonmusical settings (such as athletic events, speeches, dance performances, theatre) where audiences behave similarly or differently than musical settings provides understanding about the varying purposes of audiences in society.

Nature Of:

  1. The role of the audience in a musical performance includes listening to and appreciating music, being respectful of others, and encouraging the performers, when appropriate.
  2. People have individual musical preferences because in many ways, music affects individuals differently.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Comprehension of the basic components of music and musical performances at a beginning level

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create movements to music that reflect focused listening (DOK 2-4)
  2. Describe how ideas or moods are communicated through music (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can certain movements be more appropriate for one type of music than another?
  2. What are some specific elements of music that can change the feelings that are communicated?
  3. How do the basic elements of music communicate thoughts or emotions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Considering how the use of various instruments and/or voices changes the feelings that music conveys provides a fundamental understanding of how music communicates.
  2. Ideas and moods expressed through music are conveyed in other areas of the arts (books, movies, theatre, dance performances, commercials).

Nature Of:

  1. Music, like other art forms, exists to express thoughts and emotions as well as communicate how people perceive the world.
  2. When people listen to music, they can perceive some of the thoughts and feelings of the musician who created it.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Identify music as an integral part of everyday life

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Identify, discuss, and respond to music written for specific purposes (such as holiday, march, lullaby) (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use a personal vocabulary to describe kinds of voices and instruments and their uses in diverse cultures, applying some specific labels and some specific cultural or geographical associations (DOK 1-2)
  3. Use developmentally appropriate movements in responding to music from various genres, periods, and styles (rhythm, melody, form) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does music that is composed for various purposes contribute to a specific experience?
  2. What causes various instruments and voices to sound different from each other?
  3. How does movement to music differ from one culture to another?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Observing and imitating movement to a variety of musical styles including cultural and historical excerpts provide an understanding of the variety of ways people can express themselves through music and movement.
  2. Using pictures and books to recognize various instruments used in different types of music develops an initial ability to identify the various shapes and sizes of instruments.
  3. Using a common music vocabulary to describe instruments, voices, and musical styles helps people understand one another.

Nature Of:

  1. Music has many uses and functions in people's lives.
  2. Different kinds of music are appropriate for different functions and events.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Kindergarten
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate respect for the contributions of others in a musical setting

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe appropriate audience behavior at a live or recorded musical performance (DOK 1-2)
  2. Describe musical preferences in their own words and at an appropriate level (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What happens when an audience does not use strong listening skills at a performance?
  2. Why is it important for listeners to be respectful of one another?
  3. Why is music special to some people?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Explaining or drawing pictures that show personal preferences to music provides an initial way for articulating how music makes people feel or how they value or appreciate varying styles of music.
  2. Discussing what type of music specific storybook characters might like builds an initial ability to give meaning and context to various types of music.

Nature Of:

  1. Musical preferences can be as unique as individuals themselves.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Respond to musical performance at a basic level

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create movements that correspond to specific musical moods and styles (DOK 2-4)
  2. Identify, listen to, and discuss music written for specific purposes (work song, lullaby, etc.) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do people choose certain movements for certain styles of music and not for others?
  2. What are some aspects of music that can change the feelings that are communicated and how do they work to make music?
  3. How do the basic elements of music communicate thoughts or emotions?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Providing a developmentally appropriate opportunity for young learners to respond to music builds a foundational understanding that music promotes a reaction through feeling or preference of sounds.

Nature Of:

  1. Music is an art form and exists to express thoughts and emotions as well as communicate how people perceive the world.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Recognize and discuss music and celebrations in daily life

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Explain the use of music in sources such as cartoons, computer games, community, and home events (DOK 1-2)
  2. Listen and respond to various musical styles (such as marches and lullabies) (DOK 1-2)
  3. Use a personal vocabulary to describe kinds of voices and instruments and their uses in diverse cultures, applying some specific labels and general cultural associations (DOK 1-2)
  4. Use developmentally appropriate movements in responding to music from various genres, styles, and periods (rhythm and melody) (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does music that is composed for various purposes contribute to a specific experience?
  2. What causes various instruments and voices to sound different from each other?
  3. How does movement to music differ from one culture to another?
  4. What makes differences in musical style?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Providing diverse examples and experiences of the use of music in society builds a beginning understanding of the role music plays in individual experiences, family events, and community events.

Nature Of:

  1. Music has many uses and functions in people's lives.
  2. People describe music in their own words, and the descriptions of others may be different, but equally valid.

Content Area: Music
Grade Level Expectations: Preschool
Standard: 4. Aesthetic Valuation of Music

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

1. Demonstrate respect for music contributions

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Describe appropriate listening during a musical selection, live or recorded (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. When is it appropriate or not appropriate to talk while music is being heard?
  2. What does it mean to be respectful of others?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Discussing ways to listen to music (headphones, in an audience, on the computer, or on an audio device) provides a connection to the many purposes and functions music serves in daily life.

Nature Of:

  1. The role of the audience in a musical performance includes being respectful of others.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

2. Express feeling responses to music

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Create movements in response to music (DOK 1-2)
  2. Participate freely in music activities (DOK 1-2)
  3. Talk about expressing feeling in music (DOK 1-3)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are some specific elements of music that can change the feelings that are communicated?
  2. How do people decide what movements to make to music?
  3. Why is experiencing music fun?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Establishing a fundamental understanding of the connection of feelings and music builds foundational skills to apply to emotion and mood created through music.
  2. Discussing how and where music is heard establishes a connection to music in everyday life.

Nature Of:

  1. People express their feelings through music.

Prepared Graduates: (Click on a Prepared Graduate Competency to View Articulated Expectations)

Concepts and skills students master:

3. Recognition of music in daily life

Evidence Outcomes 21st Century Skill and Readiness Competencies

Students Can:

  1. Use examples such as music from cartoons, computer games, community, and home events (DOK 1-2)
  2. Use a personal vocabulary to describe music from diverse cultures (DOK 1-2)

Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does music that is composed for various purposes contribute to a specific experience?
  2. How do people describe the sounds of the instruments of various instrument families?
  3. How do people describe the different kinds of movement they make to music?

Relevance & Application:

  1. Identifying examples of music as live or recorded music builds a fundamental skill of listening for detail.
  2. Using developmentally appropriate movements in responding to music from various genres, styles, and periods establishes a foundational understanding that music is an individual experience and possesses societal value and purpose.

Nature Of:

  1. Describing music in their own words helps people to understand music.