The Colorado Department of Education

 

 

Case Study Practice

Jenny’s story demonstrated how to use different types of assessment data to create an IEP that is linked or threaded throughout and designed to help the student attain the PSGs. The following case study can provide practice in using assessment data to write a high quality transition IEP based on transition assessment information.

Activity #5

Practice completing a transition IEP, using the case study information on Tyler provided below (or a student you know). This case study can be used to create a comprehensive and realistic transition plan based on educational assessment data.

Directions:

  1. Read the following case and familiarize yourself with the student.
  2. Print a transition planning form template: Transition Planning Form (DOC)
  3. Use O*NET and/or College in Colorado to research Tyler’s occupations of interest and college admission requirements.
  4. Complete the transition planning form for Tyler based on his case study. Be mindful of writing a “well linked” I-13 compliant IEP.

Case Study:

Tyler is a sophomore. He lives with his parents and one younger sibling, a 13 year-old sister. His parents own a medium-sized commercial construction business where his mother is the bookkeeper and his father is the general contractor. Tyler is a shy but bright and engaging young man with a quick sense of humor and a natural ability to make people feel comfortable around him.

Tyler has received services for Specific Learning Disabilities since he was in third grade. His primary difficulties are in the areas of reading and written expression. Tyler’s 9th grade CSAP scores are 587 in reading (partially proficient- range of scores are 585-641), 430 in writing (unsatisfactory- range of scores are 260-435), and 610 in math (proficient- range of scores are 602-651). Tyler also completed the College in Colorado Learn About Yourself Interest Profiler and Career Cluster Assessment. His highest ranking on the Interest Profiler was realistic: a do-er who enjoys hands-on activities and prefers concrete problems. Using tools comes naturally. His second highest ranking was conventional: organizer who enjoys step-by step work tasks and is detail oriented. His highest Career Cluster score was architecture and construction. Currently, Tyler’s overall reading ability is measured at the 6th grade level. He scored 660L on the SRI (Scholastic Reading Inventory) at the end of 9th grade and scored a 670L on the SRI in October of his 10th grade year. He has particular difficulties with decoding and word recognition. His fluency is several years below grade level. Surprisingly, his overall reading comprehension represents the highest achievement he has in the general area of reading. Also, his oral vocabulary is close to grade level. Tyler enjoys watching the Discovery Channel shows; “Dirty Jobs”, “How It’s Made”, and “How Did They Make That?”

Tyler’s written expression is even lower than his reading. He writes at around the 4th grade level. His handwriting is labored; his spelling is also around the 4th grade level. He has difficulty writing a strong paragraph, much less a whole essay. Working on the computer has alleviated some of his fear of writing as he has learned to depend on spell and grammar checks, but his overall understanding of organizational structure, sentence structure, and semantics is quite limited. Tyler’s best efforts at writing, in his general education English courses, were in the area of poetry where he could use brevity and a strong vocabulary to his benefit.

Mathematics comes more easily to Tyler. He has passed Algebra I with a C and is currently in geometry where he is receiving mostly Bs. He does well with computational skills when he is allowed time to complete the problems. He struggles with word problems and with completing forms asking for mathematical computation. He likes math and considers it a strength.

For several years, Tyler has worked alongside his father in the summers at construction sites. He has done everything from hauling trash to being the “go-fer” for the workers. Last year, he spent time in the trailer “office” that was set up at the site. His mother encouraged him to help her with the books, billing, and other paperwork issues. Tyler dutifully complied but he really wanted to be out at the site. This next summer, his dad will let him help with pouring cement and foundation work (as much as OSHA will allow). Tyler is really excited about this possibility.

Tyler’s biggest dream in life is to become a partner with his parents in their business and eventually take over as the owner of the business. He has even approached his 13 year-old sister with the idea that they would take it over together. He is enthusiastic in sharing his dreams with his teachers and friends. There is no job too small at the site that he will not try, just to get the experience he senses he will need in order to become the business person he wants to be.

Resources:

Check Case Study Answer